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Capture: Better Food Photography

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  • Islander, in reply to Lilith __,

    All welcome (long as you esteem old-fashioned fruit salad!)

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Islander, in reply to Hebe,

    Arrrrgah!
    I have been brought up on the Maori/Scots fruit salad.*
    Which is only for Christmas/New Year and Very Especial Occaisions.
    Codamn, we have century-old dishes (serving) for these things!

    Excellent figs grow as far south as Dunedin. Bird-netting is essential-
    *Always includes alcohol (of varying kinds) and real cream.

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to Islander,

    we have century-old dishes (serving) for these things!

    Yeh heh; I have the great-grandma's huge crystal trifle/fruit salad bowl taonga in my cupboard, chips, scratches an' all.-- marks of feasts past.

    On the fig question, I had been tthinking that the very sunniest spot in the garden, sheltered by bigger trees to the south and a pictureskew old shed might be the place. Unfortunately the boundary brick wall where I had planned the citrus plantation and tamarillos and figs is now propped up all the way along with ten-foot timbers and is still leaning towards us. so I think it will go (the neighbour's insurer's decision still to be made). Thus buggering my plan of an outdoor bath surrounded by these fruit trees and a ready supply of waste water to them. A rethink of the plan, again.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2608 posts Report Reply

  • Islander, in reply to Hebe,

    Taoka indeed!
    One of the weird things I regret about a younger sister's death is that the ruby-glass crystal bowl for trifles vanished into her Australian husband's family.
    You cant do or so say anything about this kind of stuff.
    You just mourn for childhood feasts now gone forever.

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Hilary Stace,

    You lucky people with feijoas. I have planted 6 trees over the last few years and this year I have two tiny little fruits on one little tree. I think it is too windblown here. They were in the supermarket today for the first time at $12 a kilo. I just picked up a couple just to smell them. Bliss would be more feijoas than you could eat.

    Wgtn • Since Jun 2008 • 2099 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to Islander,

    You cant do or so say anything about this kind of stuff.

    Same for one of my "sides" --annoyingly the taonga went back to England.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2608 posts Report Reply

  • Islander, in reply to Hebe,

    The family's fig supply is against a limestone cliff: huge old tree (well-netted )and four younger trees - interestingly, my brother's bloody big(stands on it's hinds taller than I am) & frightening (fortunately well-trained) Alsatian will go and nip off a few figs....

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Lilith __, in reply to Islander,

    Thank you Islander, I love fruit salad, especially with cream and liquor!

    Dunedin • Since Jul 2010 • 3468 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown, in reply to Hebe,

    On the fig question, I had been tthinking that the very sunniest spot in the garden, sheltered by bigger trees to the south and a pictureskew old shed might be the place.

    Ours is hard up against the deck on the northeast side of our section, somewhat sheltered by other trees to the north. We've had the best year ever -- the grey summer seems to have suited it and there are fewer possums coming over from the reserve. The riflemen have pecked a few, but there have still been many big figs.

    I dried some and made a wonderful dish for a barbecue -- halve the figs, push some goat cheese into the cavity, wrap in prosciutto and do both sides on the hot plate. Amazing.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 18968 posts Report Reply

  • DeepRed, in reply to Russell Brown,

    I dried some and made a wonderful dish for a barbecue – halve the figs, push some goat cheese into the cavity, wrap in prosciutto and do both sides on the hot plate. Amazing.

    And I recently cooked myself a new twist on a hoary old chestnut: chorizo with kumara mash and red onion, for something very quick to put together.

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 4355 posts Report Reply

  • Jackie Clark, in reply to JacksonP,

    I second that. Russ's figs are particularly juicy and succulent. Little ruby gems, they are.

    Mt Eden, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3123 posts Report Reply

  • JacksonP,

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    Cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana). Physalis meaning bladder.

    I did not know that.

    Since we're doing fruits of distinction. Always loved these. I gather some don't.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2011 • 2144 posts Report Reply

  • Jackie Clark, in reply to JacksonP,

    I love them. Love love love them. Half the fun is unwrapping them.

    Mt Eden, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3123 posts Report Reply

  • TracyMac, in reply to Jackie Clark,

    *puts hand up to join the anti-feijoa club* I think it was compulsory for every old-skool state house with a section in Auck to have one of those trees.... :-(

    Canberra, West Island • Since Nov 2006 • 487 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie, in reply to JacksonP,

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    Since we're doing fruits of distinction. Always loved these. I gather some don't.

    Wonderful things. The jam sells for top dollar, more than blueberry in Australia.

    First fruit from ugni/ugniberry/Chilean guava/NZ cranberry
    (ugni molinae). TASTY little sucker.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 3556 posts Report Reply

  • David Hood,

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    My food pictures are never very good (mainly, I think, because I don't take the time to set up the shot), but here is some Flying Spaghetti Monster bread I made for a potluck the other weekend.

    Dunedin • Since May 2007 • 900 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to Joe Wylie,

    First fruit from ugni/ugniberry/Chilean guava/NZ cranberry
    (ugni molinae). TASTY little sucker.

    Another recent one for me; they taste like they are loaded with vitamin C.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2608 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie, in reply to David Hood,

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    Flying Spaghetti Monster bread

    Respect.

    Tiny white alpine strawbs. Ambrosial. Like the ugnis, thanks to Gudrun Gisela for the plants.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 3556 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

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    I thought today's harvest would be the end of the figs, especially given that I was pretty tough about discarding the over-ripe ones. But I think there'll be at least one more before we're done.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 18968 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to David Hood,

    Flying Spaghetti Monster bread

    Fun.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2608 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to Joe Wylie,

    white alpine strawbs

    Intriguing. Do they taste strawberry-ish?

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2608 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca, in reply to Russell Brown,

    The riflemen have pecked a few,

    Shh, Rifles, men, bush...... ;)
    Jus' lurve the spaghetti monster. I want one.

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6268 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

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    Other half made sweet and sour fish last night. He ate his as I took a photo of mine. It was yuuummmmy!

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6268 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie, in reply to Hebe,

    Do they taste strawberry-ish?

    Apart from the colour they're just like their red alpine counterparts. A bit of low-maintenance happiness among the pansies and aquilegias.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 3556 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes, in reply to David Hood,

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    Flying Spaghetti Monster bread

    Excellent.
    I think the Fejoa thing is dependent on what you did as a kid. I grew up in the UK and never tasted a Fejoa until I arrived here and I found them totally awesome, like nothing I had tasted before. I guess that when you are a kid and taste them for the first time you mat well have this same experience and, the very next time you see them, you eat them until you are sick and never touch them again.
    As for Fruit salad...
    It all comes on one plant in Queensland.
    This one does not bare fruit, or anything else for that matter but in Northern Queensland they do and, remarkably, the fruit tastes just like tinned fruit salad, even down to the hint of tin.

    The wireless north ;-) • Since Dec 2006 • 4895 posts Report Reply

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