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Capture: Roamin' Holiday

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  • Chris Waugh,

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    I must be doing something right. I've got a 9 month old bookworm on my hands. Pity she's got the book upside down, but she's only just started learning, there's plenty of time to teach her yet.

    Beijing • Since Jan 2007 • 2053 posts Report Reply

  • David Hood, in reply to Cecelia,

    what’s with the Victorian verandahs?

    Well, it was built in the 1870s and 80s.
    Though being a local, I haven't actually been to it for many years, but I gather the restoration is going relatively well.
    Along with Cargill's castle I would also note the equally impractical, and related, Tunnel Beach.

    Dunedin • Since May 2007 • 867 posts Report Reply

  • Islander, in reply to Chris Waugh,

    Indeed.
    I think some of the old pa sites are our equivalents.
    Mind you, they are distinctly lacking in the spiral staircase department..

    That's a lovely photo of your baby daughter & her book!

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Chris Waugh, in reply to Islander,

    I read her a book in English every morning, and I encourage my wife to read to her in Chinese (my wife is not much in the habit of reading, I suspect at least in part because of her parents' lack of education due to... certain unfortunate events in China's modern history) and now after I read to her I give her the book and she flips through the pages feeling (and sometimes even kissing or tasting) the pages, pictures and words. That photo above, I put her in the middle of the bed so I could hang out some washing (not as irresponsible as it may sound, Chinese apartments not being large I was never more than a couple of metres away) and she grabbed the book and started flipping through it. I'm taking this new habit of hers as a Very Good Sign.

    Spiral staircases are overrated in my experience. And from what I've read of (not much, and some time ago) of some of those old pa sites, some of them could be built virtually overnight and abandoned just as quickly as circumstances required, and they had pretty ingenious fortifications (like pallisades raised above the ground so that muskets could be fired from underneath) that gave the brits a hell of a lot of trouble. So they may be the equivalent of castles, but I rate them as being far cooler.

    Beijing • Since Jan 2007 • 2053 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie, in reply to Chris Waugh,

    . . . she flips through the pages feeling (and sometimes even kissing or tasting) the pages, pictures and words.

    My earliest memories of books are of illustrations so beautiful that licking seemed the only way to take in their colours and textures. Kathleen Hale's Orlando the Marmalade Cat was damn near irresistible. Here's one of him actually getting licky.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 3434 posts Report Reply

  • Islander, in reply to Chris Waugh,

    Chris - there are North Island sites for pa - and there are South Island sites - and all of 'em adaptable. Some lasted (the physical terraces and palisades and trenches) for generations: some lasted a battle. OK, the castle equivalent was intended to be permanant - but I still find pa - as fighting edifices - our equivalent.
    Annnd, we invented stuff for trench warfare & protection that were adopted,
    50 years later, in the first world war european slaughter-grounds...
    And I still lurve spiral staircases!

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Islander, in reply to Joe Wylie,

    O! One of my first memories of actually *reading* a book was of then kissing it!

    I'm sorry - it wasnt a classic - it was something called Nicholas Nickleby who was a cat...insofar as I remember...it *was* 60 years ago-

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Chris Waugh, in reply to Islander,

    That's pretty much what I meant by my comment on giving the brits a hell of a lot of trouble.

    And that's the funny thing about the brits. As they went about building their empire, they seemed to have learnt as much from those they colonised as they tried to teach. It sometimes seems to me that in the process of trying to "civilise" the world they wound up civilising themselves.

    Beijing • Since Jan 2007 • 2053 posts Report Reply

  • Chris Waugh, in reply to Joe Wylie,

    I don't have any similar book memories. Probably my earliest really vivid book memory was in Te Awamutu and my mum coming home from the public library with a picture dictionary each of French and German, and it wasn't the pictures, it was these words, these magic, strange, foreign, exotic words for things I knew about in English. I remember the pictures, but I don't think I really noticed them so much as they were just explanations for these words. And the words! Wow! They just opened up whole new worlds for me, sent my mind spinning out to worlds beyond our small archipelago!

    In the photo of my daughter with her book, it was the words that told me the book was upside down. Seriously, I looked over and saw her with a book and noticed that she was looking at the words (Chinese characters or hànyǔpīnyīn romanisation of the characters) upside down. I didn't notice the pictures were upside down (although that was obviously true) until I posted the photo.

    I do often catch myself glancing over an illustration and focussing entirely on the caption beneath it (like when reading the Tintin comics I posted a photo of above).

    But I don't care how my daughter comes to enjoy her books, or whether she becomes a voracious T-Rex reader like her paternal grandma, a slow food reader like me, or an occasional reader like her mummy, or what kinds of books she comes to like (she's already showing preferences!), so long as she does understand the sheer joy and adventure to be found within their pages.

    Beijing • Since Jan 2007 • 2053 posts Report Reply

  • DeepRed, in reply to Cecelia,

    I remember Larnach's Castle mostly for the opening scenes from that live-action comic book Shaker Run (from 3:30):

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 4233 posts Report Reply

  • Cecelia, in reply to DeepRed,

    Great shots of yon castle.

    Hibiscus Coast • Since Apr 2008 • 522 posts Report Reply

  • JacksonP,

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    Dye job.

    Thanks for keeping the thread warm while I've been Roamin'.

    Excuse me while I indulge in a few holiday captures.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2011 • 2135 posts Report Reply

  • JacksonP,

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    Capture my drift?

    Auckland • Since Mar 2011 • 2135 posts Report Reply

  • JacksonP,

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    Traffic hazard.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2011 • 2135 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to JacksonP,

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    Dye job.

    Gidday gorgeous.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2602 posts Report Reply

  • Chris Waugh, in reply to JacksonP,

    Would that be Mount Maunganui? Been a long time since I was in that part of the world.

    Beijing • Since Jan 2007 • 2053 posts Report Reply

  • Christopher Dempsey,

    Looks like Ohope - down near the end of the peninsula by the golf course.

    Parnell / Tamaki-Auckland… • Since Sep 2008 • 642 posts Report Reply

  • JacksonP,

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    Flip!
    Inspired by Robyn's opening shot.

    Looks like Ohope - down near the end of the peninsula by the golf course.

    Yes, Ohope beach. This was out from a kids play park on Pohutukawa Avenue. The coffee cart outside the park made the best coffee in the area. And the best ginger biscuits to go with them.

    Above shot from the wharf at Ohiwa Harbour.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2011 • 2135 posts Report Reply

  • Christopher Dempsey, in reply to JacksonP,

    My parents live on the other side of the harbour. It's an amazing harbour and I am blessed to have known it.

    Parnell / Tamaki-Auckland… • Since Sep 2008 • 642 posts Report Reply

  • JacksonP, in reply to Christopher Dempsey,

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    The wharf at night.

    It's an amazing harbour and I am blessed to have known it.

    It is a beautiful area. I grew up first in Opotiki and then Whakatane, so it's one we go back to a lot.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2011 • 2135 posts Report Reply

  • Geoff Lealand,

    Great movie theatre in Opotiki too.

    Screen & Media Studies, U… • Since Oct 2007 • 2305 posts Report Reply

  • JacksonP, in reply to Geoff Lealand,

    Great movie theatre in Opotiki too.

    Yes, I'm hoping to see you at a certain upcoming event, so we can talk more about both the theatre in question, and the little idea we discussed. ;-)

    Auckland • Since Mar 2011 • 2135 posts Report Reply

  • Geoff Lealand, in reply to JacksonP,

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    Sounds good to me. In the meantime, an exterior shot from the Silent Film Festival in Opotiki last year.

    Screen & Media Studies, U… • Since Oct 2007 • 2305 posts Report Reply

  • JacksonP, in reply to Hebe,

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    Gidday gorgeous.

    Shell we dance?

    It took me all night to think of that. Pretty poor effort, I know. ;-)

    Auckland • Since Mar 2011 • 2135 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca, in reply to JacksonP,

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    Shell we dance?
    It took me all night to think of that.

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6085 posts Report Reply

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