Capture by A photoblog

Read Post

Capture: Someone, Somewhere, In Summertime

1250 Responses

First ←Older Page 1 27 28 29 30 31 50 Newer→ Last

  • Chris Waugh, in reply to Nora Leggs,

    And their tails!

    Gareth Morgan is hiding out on Rangitoto?

    Beijing • Since Jan 2007 • 2011 posts Report Reply

  • Nora Leggs, in reply to Jos,

    This is the faceless cat queen Hazel.

    Gone all coy...

    Auckland • Since Dec 2011 • 2192 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown, in reply to Ian Dalziel,

    Nice to see David Shearer, er, out…

    I gather he asked the Rainbow Labour people if he could walk with them. He genuinely seemed to be having a great time, and talked to people in the crowd all along.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 18715 posts Report Reply

  • Nora Leggs, in reply to Chris Waugh,

    Gareth Morgan is hiding out on Rangitoto?

    Anything is possible!

    Auckland • Since Dec 2011 • 2192 posts Report Reply

  • Nora Leggs,

    Attachment Attachment Attachment

    What would summer be without a Sunday afternoon at the Kings Arms with a bunch of bands playing? No reason to move once I’d found a comfy chair in the sun.

    Auckland • Since Dec 2011 • 2192 posts Report Reply

  • Cecelia,

    Attachment

    Faceless cats, headless oysties

    Hibiscus Coast • Since Apr 2008 • 508 posts Report Reply

  • Nora Leggs, in reply to Cecelia,

    headless oysties

    Nice cluster there! I snapped some oyster-catchers yesterday too, they don't show up very well on black rocks though...

    Auckland • Since Dec 2011 • 2192 posts Report Reply

  • Islander, in reply to Jos,

    Neat! An ichneuman!

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Nora Leggs,

    Attachment

    Bit tired cos I was awake early enough to see the first morning light this morning. Very pretty, almost worth waking early for.

    Auckland • Since Dec 2011 • 2192 posts Report Reply

  • ChrisW,

    Attachment Attachment Attachment

    Today is the 75th anniversary of the Kopuawhara disaster, when 21 people working on construction of the last section of the Napier-Gisborne railway were drowned in a flash flood that came in the dark about 3.30 am and swept away the single men's section of the No. 4 works camp, on the southern side of the hills south of Gisborne. (Before and after photos via the link.) Another drowned in another works camp flooded by another stream on the northern side of the hills, in the same rainstorm.

    Sunday - 140 people gathered at the monument in their memory, having walked over 2 km by foot track and the railway line after a long drive on forestry roads, with the requisite access permissions granted for the occasion. The monument was erected in 1942 when building the railway was completed, on an elevated site where it would be prominently in view from trains passing by on the formation here seen in the background.

    The monument inscription - worth studying for the poignancy of that sure memorial, in these uncertain times for the railway they built.

    Among the speakers were sister and brother,12 and 6 years old then, living at the No.3 camp a few kilometres downstream but safe on higher ground, with their memories of the day and its aftermath 75 years ago. 12 + 75 = 87, pretty impressive.

    Gisborne • Since Apr 2009 • 821 posts Report Reply

  • Jos,

    Attachment

    Nice, I really like the panorama photo!
    I fixed it for you :)

    Whakatane • Since Jan 2012 • 854 posts Report Reply

  • ChrisW, in reply to Jos,

    I see what you did there, thanks Jos. I like it both ways - the imperfect raw stitched version as if the obelisk in yearning/ streching for the sky had popped up a segment of the frame to accommodate its apex.

    Gisborne • Since Apr 2009 • 821 posts Report Reply

  • ChrisW,

    Attachment

    The site of No.4 camp in the Kopuawhara valley, from the railway line, looking downstream. Monument at the left across the stream, in 1938 there were tiny houses for married workers on the now scrub/ forest covered surface below it, linked by a road bridge across the stream to the single men's camp on the lower surface at the right, where there were about fifty flimsy huts and the cookhouse/dining room.

    There was and still is a small channel in the surface at the back of the camp against the slope to higher ground. When the flood came over the bank into the camp there was also an uncrossable torrent scouring that channel deeper. There were men awake to wake and warn their workmates, but they were all trapped on an island between two uncrossable torrents in the dark when the bridge was swept away. And within 15 minutes or so the island was submerged in fast water neck deep and more.

    Fewer than half those in the camp that Friday night/Saturday survived, most on the roof of the small corner of the cookhouse that held up against the speed of the water and the battering by flood debris. Some many gone somewhere in summertime ...

    Gisborne • Since Apr 2009 • 821 posts Report Reply

  • ChrisW,

    Attachment Attachment Attachment

    Some of their handiwork remains in the Kopuawhara valley, but more than bridges and tunnels and rails are needed to make a railway.

    Third one is the upper half of the Kopuawhara Viaduct.

    Gisborne • Since Apr 2009 • 821 posts Report Reply

  • Jos, in reply to ChrisW,

    Attachment Attachment

    True! :)


    I photographed the breeze yesterday


    and my own purple potatoes, garlic and french tarragon ready for the bbq

    Whakatane • Since Jan 2012 • 854 posts Report Reply

  • Islander, in reply to Jos,

    Looks absolutely delicious (best potatoes about I reckon – we’ve grown them since my Grand-dad’s time (he exited, stage left, in 1952 when I was 5…the original spuds came from Purakaunui…)

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Jos,

    Wow, that's really nice to know! :)

    Whakatane • Since Jan 2012 • 854 posts Report Reply

  • Islander, in reply to Jos,

    There is a suspicion that they were introduced by American whalers (who were certainly around at that time, and who urm *interacted* with the locals: my greatgrand-dad was almost certainly the result of one such interaction (& his father was, genetically, part-Tahitian)...so: connects!
    Motoitoi is the immediate ancestor - she did a kind of Pocohontas act over 'John Miller' -

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Nora Leggs,

    Attachment

    Swallows, making it still summer....

    Auckland • Since Dec 2011 • 2192 posts Report Reply

  • Islander, in reply to Nora Leggs,

    Almost barbed wire swallows-

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Jos,

    Musical notes, I've always fancied a wrought iron thing with a treble clef and 5 bars for random birds to settle on and make random music. if you were good you could play along.

    Whakatane • Since Jan 2012 • 854 posts Report Reply

  • JacksonP,

    Attachment

    Silo markets last night were fun. Enjoyed sitting listening to old soul music with a Stoke, before they started the movies.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2011 • 2121 posts Report Reply

  • Nora Leggs,

    Attachment Attachment Attachment

    More monarchs

    Auckland • Since Dec 2011 • 2192 posts Report Reply

  • Geoff Lealand, in reply to JacksonP,

    Must add those screenings to my website. Currently sitting in the sun on Cuba Mall, after visiting the newish Light House Cuba on Wigan Street, after the obligatory stop-off at Slowboat Records (in Wellington, to deliver my daughter to university).

    Wonder how I spot PA types in the passing parade....

    Screen & Media Studies, U… • Since Oct 2007 • 2288 posts Report Reply

  • Nora Leggs,

    Attachment

    Best butterfly fly by yet….

    Auckland • Since Dec 2011 • 2192 posts Report Reply

First ←Older Page 1 27 28 29 30 31 50 Newer→ Last

Post your response…

Please sign in using your Public Address credentials…

Login

You may also create an account or retrieve your password.