Current Status: Holidays

370 Responses

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  • Hilary Stace,

    Great idea Steven. But not sure that it would fit into the car boot with the luggage and wheelchair. And what about the hoist for getting on and off it?

    Wgtn • Since Jun 2008 • 2076 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    mascarpone doesn't travel very well, does it?

    It seemed to do just fine in this case. Yum.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16614 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    Great idea Steven

    I reckon a bit of DIY barrier removal is a great idea.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16614 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    only think about people who use wheelchairs when they are forced to

    And only think about wheelchairs when they hear the word "disabled".

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16614 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    Not about this conversation, I should add, just a general observation.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16614 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    It seemed to do just fine in this case. Yum.

    I was referring to its tendency to become lethal. Are you sure it's not some sort of ersatz cream?

    (I'm asking primarily because I love using the word "ersatz").

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7358 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    One small cheer on the current topic: to the Big Day Out organisers for finally installing a proper viewing platform for people in wheelchairs. As I noted in my BDO wrap-up, it helped a 16 year-old with cerebral palsy have one of the days of her life.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 18837 posts Report Reply

  • Hilary Stace,

    Yes that was good to hear Russell. Especially considering Neil Young's links with CP. I just hope the parking and transport facilities were as good.

    Wgtn • Since Jun 2008 • 2076 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    Another welcome development: the overdue installation of a platform for wheelchair users at the foot of the East stand. Among those enjoying it on the day was Erin, a 16 year-old with cerebral palsy who keeps a blog.

    Yes, good on the organisers - and thanks for linking to Erin's blog.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16614 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    Are you sure it's not some sort of ersatz cream?

    Oh I recall it being totally genuine - as you'd expect from any product Kapiti decided to be involved with. Can't remember the Italian brand name and Kapiti don't seem to have a website.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16614 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    Oh I recall it being totally genuine - as you'd expect from any product Kapiti decided to be involved with.

    Kapiti makes a cheese called Parmesan. Parmesan is to Parmigiano as the sound of my gargling is to Pavarotti's rendition of Libiamo.

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7358 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    But us simple kiwis struggle to say parmesan - imagine what we'd do with parmigiano.

    The tiramisu is italian product and Kapiti are just the agent - wouldn't be surprised if their managers stumbled on it while visiting your homeland.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16614 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    But us simple kiwis struggle to say parmesan - imagine what we'd do with parmigiano.

    I meant taste wise!

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7358 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    I know, and I have no rejoinder. National radio this afternoon had a doco on the history of kiwi cuisine. It involved a fair bit of bastardisation of other cultures, so I understand your wariness. I'm sure your grandmother made a better tiramisu. Mine, not so much.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16614 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    Italian cuisine has involved a lot of bastardisation. Bastardisation is good. Except on occasion for things that do involve processes that have taken centuries to develop and are quite painstaking and exacting - for that reason I find the misuse of the word parmesan especially egregious. Other times I get mildly irritated when words get stolen and then misapplied simply on the grounds of the marketablity of the source language: I mean, what the hell is a "Latte"? And once I got corrected asking for a panino. "It's actually panini, sir." But we've done the same to other cultures, continue to do so, it's all fine and good.

    (Here's one: the Italian word for jogging is "footing").

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7358 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    I'd say there are degrees of bastardisation. I think we're talking pizza with tinned spaghetti and pineapple on it, that kind of thing. And don't get me started on butter chicken.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16614 posts Report Reply

  • Danielle,

    And once I got corrected asking for a panino. "It's actually panini, sir."

    <wince>

    Charo World. Cuchi-cuchi!… • Since Nov 2006 • 3653 posts Report Reply

  • Kyle Matthews,

    And once I got corrected asking for a panino. "It's actually panini, sir."

    Conversely, I get annoyed if I pronounce 'fillet', and say the T, and people correct me. My ex used to do it, and she was American. I was always tempted write down "St. Louis" and ask her to pronounce it, and then tell her it should be pronounced "Sain' Lou-ee", because it's named after the King of France.

    Since Nov 2006 • 6165 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    I was always tempted write down "St. Louis" and ask her to pronounce it, and then tell her it should be pronounced "Sain' Lou-ee", because it's named after the King of France.

    I'm with you on fillet (bet you that was McDonald's doing), but I want to be there next time you say the word "sachet".

    The thing about panini is that my server was actually right. When "panini" enters the New Zealand English dictionary (if it hasn't already), it will be listed as sing. panini, pl. paninis. It's just that, being a colossal pain in the arse, I can't bring myself to say it that way. For the same reason, when we're out Justine will have a latte, but if I'm the one ordering she has to settle for a flat white.

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7358 posts Report Reply

  • Gareth Ward,

    My holiday update - spent the last 17 days of it in Cambs, London and Paris where it was a "warm" day if it got over 1degree. I have read some of the stories in here and wept.

    Auckland, NZ • Since Mar 2007 • 1721 posts Report Reply

  • Kyle Matthews,

    I'm with you on fillet (bet you that was McDonald's doing), but I want to be there next time you say the word "sachet".

    Well indeed. We take words from other languages wholesale, and some we pronounce 'properly' (or close to it), others we completely massacre.

    For people to be snobby about the former on the basis that "it's French!", and then to use the latter without blinking...

    They're now English words, and like much of the English language, they're ripped off from other languages. Also like much of the English language, they're now said in an 'English' way, which may, or may not be consistent with their origins. Deal.

    PS: I would hardly ever say 'sachet', I'm a 'packet' kinda guy really. Simple folk and all that.

    Since Nov 2006 • 6165 posts Report Reply

  • Craig Ranapia,

    The thing about panini is that my server was actually right.

    Possibly, but that's not really the point. I call paninis "pretentious toastie pies" and the next service drone who gets snotty about it, will also learn my preferred sobriquet for food service drones with attiude.

    North Shore, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 11926 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    I call paninis "pretentious toastie pies"

    I was impressed that the Victoria Park New World has many solid bacon, egg and cheese toasted sammies (presumably for their 3am crowd) rather than the panini I fully expected to see. Unconscious snobbery confounded, and tasty to boot.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16614 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie,

    I call paninis "pretentious toastie pies" and the next service drone who gets snotty about it, will also learn my preferred sobriquet for food service drones with attiude.

    Good on you. You might make your point even more effectively if armed with a solid jaffle iron.

    "Toastie pies", ffs - ghod we can be such an effete little nation at times.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 3460 posts Report Reply

  • Craig Ranapia,

    Good on you. You might make your point even more effectively if armed with a solid jaffle iron.

    Holy fnark... not only an offensive weapon, but you can imagine you're chowing down on something cute and furry after. (Call me a freak if you must, but I find koalas almost as creepy as clowns.) These are the moments I think the human race hasn't been a complete waste of time. :)

    North Shore, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 11926 posts Report Reply

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