Field Theory by Hadyn Green

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Field Theory: The Force will be with you, always.

64 Responses

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  • Stewart, in reply to BenWilson,

    That's quite a sizeable rat, drinking your coffee, Ben.
    Not sure what weight the 'average' rat would be, but 1kg is a rat worthy of some respect.

    Te Ika A Maui - Waitakere… • Since Oct 2008 • 563 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to Stewart,

    ...but a 1kg is a rat worthy of some respect.

    Wait till you meet the Capybaristas...

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 4687 posts Report Reply

  • DexterX,

    "Blog" by Iva Blog

    Wrong place right time:

    The funk is strong with this one


    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1186 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Ian Dalziel,

    Capybaristas

    zing

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16495 posts Report Reply

  • TracyMac, in reply to DexterX,

    Perhaps for me it's exactly the fact it's a HERO myth (young clueless dude with unknown magical powers finds them and himself) that it bounced off me . I tend to find the whole trope tedious in the extreme, unless it's done well. Princess Leia is in there, but really, her big hero moment is when she strangles Jabba. Maybe she was actually an awesome politician and held the whole Rebel Alliance together - who knows?

    Ok, great, it spawned off a whole huge amount of associated media and that's cool if you're into it. But in terms of actual inspiring-to-me scifi films, Bladerunner blew my socks off. It's not plot by the numbers, the "world" doesn't require people running around in monkey suits, and it has plenty to chew on in terms of the wider context of the story.

    Because a story is simple and universal doesn't mean we all relate to or like that particular renderinng of it. There is plenty of trash I enjoyed reading and watching in my teens (Anne McCaffrey springs to mind) and I enjoy it as "comfort reads" from time to time still. But I don't expect anyone else will automatically have the same response and enjoyment of them as I did at the time (I wouldn't particularly recommend McCaffrey to a teenage girl now), and nor would I point to them as exemplars of deathless Art that must be experienced by everyone.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 466 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to TracyMac,

    Princess Leia is in there, but really, her big hero moment is when she strangles Jabba. Maybe she was actually an awesome politician and held the whole Rebel Alliance together - who knows?

    She's always in the thick of it, you can't accuse her of not pulling her action weight. She's the last one to leave the rebel base when Hoth is invaded, still barking evacuation instructions. She's on board the fleeing ship custodian of the stolen plans, defiant in the face of torture by Vader. She's in the rearguard battle on Cloud City, she's riding a speeder on Endor, shooting at Storm Troopers. She totally chokes out Jabba, and that's after staunching out the whole throne room dressed as a bounty hunter carrying a suicide bomb. Not to mention she has some of the best lines. She's a really big part of what made the first franchise hold together. However, yeah, the story is for kids.

    But I totally agree on Blade Runner. It really stands the test of time. I saw it only last week and thought it hadn't aged at all. I think the total absence of spin-offs is cool too, it could so easily have been wrecked. Similarly with 2001: A Space Odyssey (except for the fact that 2001 has been and gone, and I still can't book a Pan Am flight to the moon. I can, however make video call from a flight, now). The idea that space exploration is probably going to mostly be done by robots is proving more true every day. HAL was probably miffed to have to waste all the payload carrying meatsacks.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 8318 posts Report Reply

  • DeepRed, in reply to BenWilson,

    But I totally agree on Blade Runner. It really stands the test of time. I saw it only last week and thought it hadn’t aged at all.

    Another production that's aged well is Max Headroom. Many of the phenomena depicted in the show have since come to pass, so what's still to eventuate? Live snuff, for one.

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 4158 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to BenWilson,

    total absence of spin-offs

    not for long

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16495 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Sacha,

    O, by Toutatis! It better be good.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 8318 posts Report Reply

  • Biobbs, in reply to BenWilson,

    O, by Toutatis! It better be good.

    I'd settle for just 'better than Prometheus'. Not holding my breath, though.

    The River Mouth, Denmark • Since Jan 2011 • 107 posts Report Reply

  • Craig Ranapia, in reply to BenWilson,

    But I totally agree on Blade Runner. It really stands the test of time. I saw it only last week and thought it hadn’t aged at all.

    What happened to Blade Runner was a cinematic version of the old joke about the Velvet Underground and Nico. It tanked in 1982, but everyone who saw it went off and drew comic books, directed music videos and made more movies where the future was cluttered, wet and the neon was the only thing that (kinda) worked.

    North Shore, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 11867 posts Report Reply

  • DeepRed, in reply to Craig Ranapia,

    The 1982 version was also heavily chopped by the studio execs. Hence the first of how many umpteens of director's cuts.

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 4158 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Craig Ranapia,

    Yes, it's seldom a future of unlimited suburban sprawl.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 8318 posts Report Reply

  • Tim Michie, in reply to TracyMac,

    And then there's this.

    Auckward • Since Nov 2006 • 547 posts Report Reply

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