Hard News by Russell Brown

Read Post

Hard News: Dunce Dunce Revolution

182 Responses

First ←Older Page 1 2 3 4 5 8 Newer→ Last

  • Paul Campbell,

    It's Friday - my contribution: XKCD animated

    Dunedin • Since Nov 2006 • 2152 posts Report Reply

  • Graeme Edgeler,

    An incredible film, for everyone to enjoy on their Friday:

    I promise you won't regret it, unless you suck :-P

    Wellington, New Zealand • Since Nov 2006 • 3004 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes,

    Ah. Friday, time for some fun.
    Hopefully no persons of interest were harmed in the making of this movie. ;-)

    The wireless north ;-) • Since Dec 2006 • 4861 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    It's Friday - my contribution: XKCD animated

    Lovely!

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7378 posts Report Reply

  • Paul Campbell,

    And given the title we just need a link to Dance Dance Immolation - two members of the audience in nomex suits and flame throwers for when you screw up ....

    Dunedin • Since Nov 2006 • 2152 posts Report Reply

  • Lucy Stewart,

    What I want to know is if Tolley thinks that there's a way to teach science and science concepts *without* addressing literacy and numeracy. If nothing else, if you're not introducing a whole lot of new words and logical ways of thinking, you're not teaching it right.

    (This has weighed on my mind somewhat because on Saturday I have to sit the general GRE, an US requirement for graduate school entrance that tests literacy and numeracy. If your university system is organised in such a way that someone having an undergraduate degree is not enough evidence that they are, in fact, literate and numerate, *you're doing it wrong*.)

    Amherst, MA • Since Nov 2006 • 2093 posts Report Reply

  • Paul Campbell,

    In the US entering University for an undergraduate course you're expected to pass a General Ed requirement - largely this is NZ 7th form math/english/science - so by the time you hit a post grad environment yes you should have passed this stuff - but really the GREs are intended to allow the best schools a way to pick the best students - so anything simple that weeds people out probably is to be expected

    Dunedin • Since Nov 2006 • 2152 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie,

    Thank you very much Graeme, delightful.

    In a rather different vein, this little Russian jewel from the dying years of the cold war has surfaced on Youtube:

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 3510 posts Report Reply

  • Geoff Lealand,

    We are delivering three 16 year old girls, for cos-play, to Armageddon on Saturday morning. I hope there are not high winds as my daughter may well be whisked away, in her great pink outfit.

    Another great Media 7 last night. Bryce is a smart guy, and probably one of the best newspaper editors in NZ. I agree with your comments re Dennis Dutton. I have clashed with him in the past and he turns everything into a personal attack. He is probably the reason why I have never joined the Skeptics.

    Screen & Media Studies, U… • Since Oct 2007 • 2311 posts Report Reply

  • Richard Kyle,

    Having worked for a few years in both the UK and NZ teaching systems I think heading down the UK route re literacy and numeracy hours is horrifying. Most teachers i the UK dream of our (NZ) integrated approach...whether it is the embedded literacy in an art class or what ever the subject.

    Gawd, I'm already bemoaning the tiny amount of art/music/creativity happening in our local school and now I sense it only is going to decrease. Sure the pedagogy in the 70s/80s got some things 'slightly' wrong with the lack of teaching basic math/english rules like multiplication tables but ... really!

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 19 posts Report Reply

  • Lucy Stewart,

    but really the GREs are intended to allow the best schools a way to pick the best students - so anything simple that weeds people out probably is to be expected

    I feel somewhat skeptical that a multi-choice test of your arcane vocabulary knowledge and fifth-form maths is actually going to separate people in a meaningful way, especially when the difference between a high and a mediocre grade can be as little as five questions.

    I agree with your comments re Dennis Dutton. I have clashed with him in the past and he turns everything into a personal attack. He is probably the reason why I have never joined the Skeptics.

    I have heard he's also the kind of person who assigns his own books and essays as a very significant portion of the reading for courses he teaches, which is...somewhat telling.

    Amherst, MA • Since Nov 2006 • 2093 posts Report Reply

  • Geoff Lealand,

    This has weighed on my mind somewhat because on Saturday I have to sit the general GRE

    My sympathies! As I recall the GRE, it was an absolute cow of an exam. I sat it in advance of my post-grad studies in the USA and as I recall, ended up in the top 5% percentile for comprehension and bottom 5% for logic/analysis! It was full of those sort of questions like.."If a train is travelling at .. and another train is travelling at..."; the kind of questions which turn my brain to mud.

    Great about Southland winning last night, eh!

    Screen & Media Studies, U… • Since Oct 2007 • 2311 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    cos-play

    I admit I still think first of a food fight rather than geeky dress-ups when I see this term.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16680 posts Report Reply

  • James Green,

    That was the interview that Henry was born to do!

    Dunedin • Since Nov 2006 • 689 posts Report Reply

  • James Green,

    I feel somewhat skeptical that a multi-choice test of your arcane vocabulary knowledge and fifth-form maths is actually going to separate people in a meaningful way, especially when the difference between a high and a mediocre grade can be as little as five questions.

    Bahaha. Unfortunately NZ's relative disdain for intelligence testing is not overly useful, although perhaps that should be the real criteria for logical thinking. Despite the ideal that it studying should not convey an advantage for such tests, it's not the case, which puts us at a disadvantage.

    Dunedin • Since Nov 2006 • 689 posts Report Reply

  • Paul Litterick,

    I have heard he's also the kind of person who assigns his own books and essays as a very significant portion of the reading for courses he teaches, which is...somewhat telling.

    Denis Dutton's views on Aesthetics are somewhat quaint (with all the menace that word implies). At present, he is trying to kill off the subject by claiming that Art can be explained by Evolutionary Psychology, a discipline which has become the last refuge of a scoundrel.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1000 posts Report Reply

  • Phil Lyth,

    In a week when significant changes to the ACC scheme have also been set in motion more on the basis of ideology than evidence

    Actually, in the absence of evidence, as I/S discovered yesterday.

    Wellington • Since Apr 2009 • 443 posts Report Reply

  • Craig Ranapia,

    Dutton is essentially a conspiracy theorist on climate change.

    And Jonathan Eisen is essentially... Aw, you know something Russell, you had him nailed a decade back. Dutton may give me a headache on occasion, but at least he's not running around saying that treating children with cancer is all about self-interested corporate whores lining their own pockets.

    North Shore, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 12003 posts Report Reply

  • Matthew Poole,

    The ACC thing just gets scarier. Not only do we face every likelihood that the workers' account will be opened to competition, we now have this wonderful idea, attributed to John Key: He refused to rule out possible similar treatment of other ACC accounts, such as the motor vehicles one, into which car drivers pay levies when renewing their vehicle registration.

    There are only two ways that unprofitable accounts (ie: everything except the workers' account) could possibly work in the private sector:
    1) Premiums go up exponentially. If motorcyclists think they've got it bad with the proposed changes now, wait until they see what'll hit them when the people carrying their cover have to make a profit! Or,
    2) Which is a much, much, much scarier option, is that the insurers are allowed to sue those who cause injury to their clients. If they can't charge premiums at a level that will sustain cover and also return a profit, they will have to seek cost recovery. There is no alternative. And that, of course, will put us into the wonderful realm of American-style tort fuckery. Hoo-fucking-ray.

    So, I feel that a huge fuck-you-very-much needs to go out to Act voters right about now. Coz if National introduces legislation to make any or all of the other accounts competitive, Act will vote for it in a heartbeat.

    Oh, and as an almost-side note, whatever happened to investing in NZ? We have no native accident insurers, they'll all be Australian and American. That means that the profits will be siphoned off overseas, on top of the destruction of ACC's investment portfolio. That's just "O for Oarsome" beyond words.

    Edit: I hope that National would only be likely to try and make the other accounts competitive on the basis of pressure from Act. I don't think their ideological blinkers are quite that fixed, but I guess it's possible. Having Act in the equation, though, changes everything. And not for the better.

    The pit from whence crawl… • Since Mar 2007 • 3908 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    And Jonathan Eisen is essentially... Aw, you know something Russell, you had him nailed a decade back.

    I did say I wasn't comparing them. But Dutton does annoy me.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 18893 posts Report Reply

  • Tom Beard,

    It seemed strange at first that numeracy was considered important, but science not. Wouldn't those who support mathematics also support science?

    But then of course it struck me: science helps you understand the world; arithmetic helps you become an accountant or currency trader. And we all know which is more important if you're ambitious for Nu Zild.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 1039 posts Report Reply

  • Geoff Lealand,

    Well put. We should never let ill-educated politicians anywhere near education.

    Screen & Media Studies, U… • Since Oct 2007 • 2311 posts Report Reply

  • HORansome,

    I had a little bit of a try at that conversation with Vicki when I was at the conference the Skeptics held in Wellington last month. It does seem odd that the Skeptics (and we're talking here about a movement rather than just specifically the New Zealand variety) are willing to suspend their method of inquiry when it comes to Climate Change, especially since they're all over Bill Maher at the moment for being inconsistent in his skepticism.

    Tāmaki Makaurau • Since Sep 2008 • 408 posts Report Reply

  • Lucy Stewart,

    Bahaha. Unfortunately NZ's relative disdain for intelligence testing is not overly useful, although perhaps that should be the real criteria for logical thinking.

    The ability to identify words like "torrid", "sere", and "limpid" is, quite frankly, far more a test of how much old-school Trek fanfic I've been reading this week than native intelligence.

    Amherst, MA • Since Nov 2006 • 2093 posts Report Reply

  • George Darroch,

    It really does seem to me that there is an active hostility in this Government, among some Ministers at least, to expert opinion. There's a desire to see things as simply black and white, the solutions as a matter of common sense, and those who say that things are more complicated as hand-wringing and politically-correct people who would rather not face up to hard facts.

    I hesitate to say this with boldness at the moment, because it is a strong claim, but the evidence of this demeanor seems to be accumulating. In education, it seems clear.

    The People's Republic of … • Since Nov 2006 • 2135 posts Report Reply

First ←Older Page 1 2 3 4 5 8 Newer→ Last

Post your response…

Please sign in using your Public Address credentials…

Login

You may also create an account or retrieve your password.