Hard News by Russell Brown

Read Post

Hard News: Wanna Route?

119 Responses

First ←Older Page 1 2 3 4 5 Newer→ Last

  • BenWilson,

    If I'm drafting you it's because you were faster and overtook me.

    If I'm drafting you it's cause I've got an army and I'm gonna teach you how to act like a man.


    Jackie: Bike Barn 50% off sale right now.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 8675 posts Report Reply

  • Jackie Clark,

    oh cool, thanks Ben

    Mt Eden, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3123 posts Report Reply

  • Stephen Judd,

    Dude at the bike shop the other day told me that now-ish is a good time to buy bikes generally. Bike shops get rid of their old stock to make room for this year's models around now. People don't get the urge to buy a bike over winter, but wait until the weather improves (plus there's the xmas present bikes too. So mid-late winter is bike sale time. I was looking at a bike already on sale and then he said "but I could do you $XXX" (figure 20% lower again).

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 2972 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    Speaking of retail, Tim Welch at Rode seems to be selling a lot of "classic" looking Euro bikes to women at the moment. They seem to enjoy the chance to buy something solid and well-made that looks a bit lovely.

    OTOH, I picked up a full-suspension Merida MTB at Velo's 50% off sale a few weeks ago. Still working out how to ride the thing, of course ...

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 19019 posts Report Reply

  • Martin Roberts,

    it's a bit of a bugger that the return trip to the Waitemata side via the SH20 cycleway involves a fairly taxing climb from sea level to Hillsborough Rd.

    Agreed. I always take Onehunga Mall instead, but may try the climb once more with the new bridge crossing to partway up Seacliffe Rd.

    I had grand dreams of riding that way at least weekly, with my new job beside SH20 and a shortened commute that freed up an hour for discretionary cycling. Turns out, to the detriment of my waistline, that however much I love riding it just doesn't happen unless I have an errand to run. Perhaps a weekly treat from the Icebreaker outlet near the airport is in order?

    And if we're recommending favourite shops, I always try Bruce at Adventure Cycles for items out of the ordinary.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 88 posts Report Reply

  • Raymond A Francis,

    No point giving my fav routes as I imagine there are not a lot of PAS locally and if there were they would no the good ones
    One of the real joys of my old age is taking up biking, first on one of the kids old MTBs and now my own hybrid
    I am not convinced disc brakes are necessary for my type of riding but adjustable suspension is a great toy

    I hadn't ridden since my early teens (not counting horses and the last 20 years of quads of course) and its just so much fun

    Although I have to say with the recent frosts I have been doing some serious walks instead as to keep fit, we are off to France for a village type wedding so don't want to let the side down

    Fingerless gloves are essential I don't think I could leave home with out them now even though I have yet to take a serious spill
    I think it pays to buy from a good local shop that will stand behind their gear and as above, this is a good time to do it

    45' South • Since Nov 2006 • 545 posts Report Reply

  • Jon Briggs,

    Wallis Cycles in Ellerslie is a great family run store with excellent mechanics. Most importantly they don't try to rip you off with unnecessary parts, as has happened to my wife at some branches of the chain stores.

    Since Dec 2008 • 16 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    Turns out, to the detriment of my waistline, that however much I love riding it just doesn't happen unless I have an errand to run. Perhaps a weekly treat from the Icebreaker outlet near the airport is in order?

    I'm quite glad I don't commute. I'll still ride five days a week, but it's nice to be able to mix it up.

    And if we're recommending favourite shops, I always try Bruce at Adventure Cycles for items out of the ordinary.

    Ah. Always wondered what those guys were about. Pt Chev's quite well served for proper cycle shops, isn't it?

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 19019 posts Report Reply

  • Peter Ashby,

    I can recommend MapMyRun.com which you can search for cycle dedicated routes as well as runs. I use it both to suggest runs already posted for the youngest in both Auckland and Dunedin and to put in my own suggestions (knowing both places) from here in Scotland. It is free, you just have to put up with ads that can be ignored (be careful though, adblocker was preventing my access for a while).

    Dundee, Scotland • Since May 2007 • 425 posts Report Reply

  • Geoff Lealand,

    Wilth all the expertise here, someone might have some advice. I ride an Avanti road bike to uni most days (only minor hills on the way) . I enjoy the ride but something about my bike setup doesn't seem right as I often seem to have to push my bum backward on the saddle when I hunch forward at speed. Should the saddle be level, or tipped slightly forward or back? Should my seat be higher or lower?

    And where do you get good padded cycle shorts? I tried a pair at Katmandu once, and couldn't get them above my knees!

    I reckon we all should chip in and buy Jackie a bike! I would be a starter with $100.

    Screen & Media Studies, U… • Since Oct 2007 • 2331 posts Report Reply

  • Seka,

    Cyclists are just like motorists in my opinion; some are smart, polite and responsible. Others are stupid, irresponsible and cause accidents.

    I think more cycle lanes are needed but, there will always be idiot's on the road whether they're in cars or on bikes makes not a lot of difference.

    Christchurch • Since Jul 2010 • 8 posts Report Reply

  • anth,

    It isn't our imagination that most punctures happen in bad weather, rubber is much easier to cut when wet. Big thick knobbly MTB tyres mean the cut has to be much deeper, but all that extra drag makes them less fun on the road. A kevlar belt helps a lot too and imposes a smaller impact on ride quality.

    Being horrified at the thought of wearing cycling shorts seems very common, I certainly was once upon a time. Most who have tried them on a long ride find it so much more comfortable that we get over this pretty quickly. I've never been tempted by the replica team uniforms though, paying to wear all that advertising seems odd to me.

    I consider being drafted a complement. I was doing bunch rides quite a lot a couple of years ago and thought that those who never took a turn at the front were implicitly acknowledging that those of us who did were stronger riders. I can see how someone who a never pulls but eventually sprints off could be annoying though, assuming that they hadn't wanted to go faster all along but were waiting until it was safe to pass.

    As for bike shops I've been happy with Mt Eden Cycles. A few years ago I was after a do-anything bike, fast enough to go out with the roadies, tough enough for some easy single-track, with rack and mudguard mounts for commuting. This was the 11th bike shop I went to and the 1st that had anything suitable (a Specialized Tricross). Their service since then has been great.

    As with most thigs bike the late great Sheldon Brown is an excellent source of advice on saddle adjustment. It does sound though like Geoff's is too close to the handle bars or tilted forward a bit.

    Since Nov 2006 • 77 posts Report Reply

  • Jackie Clark,

    Geoff, so kind, but not necessary, really. Did I ever tell you what a silver fox you are?

    Mt Eden, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3123 posts Report Reply

  • George Darroch,

    It isn't our imagination that most punctures happen in bad weather,

    On that subject, my advice would be to spend an extra $100 and buy some really good puncture-proof tyres. I haven't had a puncture now in 9 months of daily riding, and it makes a lot of difference. Walking out the door about to go to work and finding a flat tyre is never a fun experience!

    The People's Republic of … • Since Nov 2006 • 2136 posts Report Reply

  • anth,

    buy some really good puncture-proof tyres

    Yeah, that was what I meant by the belt. I've not tried those belts that can be added between the tyre and inner tube. You and I agree about the puncture proof tyres, but some people don't like the way those stiffer tyres handle.

    Since Nov 2006 • 77 posts Report Reply

  • George Darroch,

    You and I agree about the puncture proof tyres, but some people don't like the way those stiffer tyres handle.

    I should also say that they last longer, which means they work out similar in price over the longer term, and you're being even greener than you would otherwise be. Some shops take old tyres and tubes in for recycling, but I don't know around Auckland.

    I haven't noticed too much stiffness - I inflate my tyres reasonably, but not too much. You can also buy puncture-proof tubes, and they perform pretty well without stiffness. I've used belts before and they've been a little disappointing, and can be fiddly to install.

    The People's Republic of … • Since Nov 2006 • 2136 posts Report Reply

  • George Darroch,

    On another subject, I have to say that I've been heartened by the rise of 'hybrid' bikes, the ones that have larger tyres but are still orientated to road/commuter use. With the proliferation of the personal car in the 1960s-1980s the bicycle industry started making bicycles to suit a form of leisure rather than transport - racing orientated road bikes, and seriously off-road based mountain bikes. As cycling has moved back into the mainstream, the industry has followed.

    I think that cycling shops are still a large part of the problem. They're mostly run by enthusiasts, and the enthusiasts sell what they want and consider is useful in a bicycle, rather than what normal people want - simplicity, comfort, utility. Upright seating and baskets, rather than custom forks and ultralight frames.

    If we could see an increase in "Dutch" or upright bikes I think we'd see a further increase in bicycle use. It's coming, but slowly. Hub gearing is also making a serious comeback. All these things combined may be enough to see cycling take back a decent mode share of transport.

    The People's Republic of … • Since Nov 2006 • 2136 posts Report Reply

  • Lisa Black,

    @Jackie - don't be afraid of buying a bike off Trade Me. Have a look through for a few days, you'll quickly begin to tell which bikes have barely been ridden (the description will say so!) and which have probably been thrashed.

    As long as a bike hasn't been badly crashed any work required is likely to be fairly minor & thus cheap. Bicycles are fairly straightforward beasties, mostly just metal shapes held together by bolts.

    You could have a look at http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-nz/bikefinder/ to help you figure out what style of bike might suit. I'm thinking a hybrid or city/commuter or comfort bike, perhaps.

    @George - yes, more comfortable/non-sport/sit-up-and-beg bikes please! I'm planning to build myself one out of a vintage curved frame and with an internal hub gear. I love the Gazelles and Pashleys et al but oh the prices!

    @Jack - have you had a look at http://hubstripping.wordpress.com/internal-gear-hub-review/ ?

    Wellington • Since Jul 2010 • 64 posts Report Reply

  • Stephen Judd,

    Curse you Lisa, and curse you again. I'd just managed to forget about lovely, shiny, sexy, convenient, modern, commuter-friendly 8 speed internal hubs and you have to go and remind me.

    There is a particular bike in a particular rack in a particular bike shop that I just stared at every time I went past this last month, until I stopped going past it. Because new bikes and new hubs are not on the list right now. House is on the list. Cannot buy new shiny things. House house house.

    But I want one. If I didn't already have a bike set up for the run to work and back, I'd be getting an internal hub commuter tomorrow. (Bloke at the shop would do me $800 off list price of $1100, he told me...)

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 2972 posts Report Reply

  • Lisa Black,

    Well. Unfair tactics if you ask me, Stephen. There is temptation - and then there is seduction.

    This is the problem with falling in love with bicycles. One becomes such a sucker for every hot little number flirting cheekily from a bike shop window.

    I think I'll enjoy building myself one instead though. I know I'll need help with a couple of things but I can mostly do it myself for cheap, and I'll have the great pleasure of sourcing parts bit by bit and ending up with something perfect.*

    *Suspect this may not happen. Suspect I will keep having *fabulous* ideas for mods.

    Wellington • Since Jul 2010 • 64 posts Report Reply

  • Carol Green,

    Te Atatatu Peninsular

    Russell, as a resident I feel an obligation to correct you. It's Te Atatu Peninsula.
    Or Te Atatu North, though some of the posher residents would have you up for that.
    But never Te Atatatu Peninsular.
    Just sayin.

    Waitakere • Since Jul 2008 • 40 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    Duh. Thanks Carol. I just have a blind spot for that word.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 19019 posts Report Reply

  • Jolisa,

    I reckon we all should chip in and buy Jackie a bike! I would be a starter with $100.

    Seriously, Jackie: got a Paypal account or something?

    Auckland, NZ • Since Nov 2006 • 1427 posts Report Reply

  • ChrisW,

    Te Atatatu Peninsular

    Russell, as a resident I feel an obligation to correct you. It's Te Atatu Peninsula.
    Or Te Atatu North, though some of the posher residents would have you up for that.

    Peninsular and Orient
    Steered Hoipolloi to an
    Extra R

    Meeting by occident
    we find reorientation
    out west

    Te Atatatu

    Extra thanks for this –

    The sound of the future
    as weighty vehicles stutter
    across the cattle-stop judder bars
    of shopping mall carparks
    ,
    fossil fuel to burn
    to power the window displays,
    user pays,
    the world is saved.

    Gisborne • Since Apr 2009 • 850 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson,

    Dutch style bikes are good in flat towns. Not sure how good they'd be in Auckland though. A lighter bike is always welcome, as is a large gear range. I agree that if they're tricked out with baskets etc, they're more immediately useful, but there's a reason these things are sold as extras. Not everyone wants them, and they often want to mix/match styles, quality etc. Some people never ride at night, so have no need for lights. Others don't want accessories that can be easily stolen, because their bikes are chained up in public for long periods.

    The hybrid style (I have one) is a nice compromise for Auckland terrain. It's nice and light, comfortable to ride at a leisurely pace, but not uncomfortable to power along on.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 8675 posts Report Reply

First ←Older Page 1 2 3 4 5 Newer→ Last

Post your response…

Please sign in using your Public Address credentials…

Login

You may also create an account or retrieve your password.