Posts by Emma Hart

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  • Speaker: Compulsory voting and election turnout,

    Okay, caught up now. Some things.

    Voting places MUST stay open until dead on 7pm. The signage will be taken in before the doors are locked. I would hope that “I can’t get there on the day” will be mitigated by growing awareness of advance voting.

    I am still opposed to compulsory voting. I don’t want people to have the same attitude to voting as they do to jury service: that it’s an onerous and annoying requirement. The atmosphere in voting places is by and large really lovely, because everyone who’s there wants to be there. I love it that people are queuing by the time the doors open. (I also don't want to wade through dozens of deliberately spoiled ballot papers, thanks.)

    We desperately need better civics education, though. I talked to people who didn’t know what an electorate was. I don’t mean people who thought their electorate was [suburb], or who didn’t know which one they were in, but who didn’t understand the concept of an electorate. That means you have no concept of having an MP, someone whose job is to represent you. And these were the people who actually bothered coming down to vote. I spent a couple of weeks before the election telling people stuff they didn’t know – like an Ezivote card isn’t voter ID. You don’t need it. I don’t know how many people didn’t vote because they didn’t have it, but I do know many came down on the off-chance that maybe they could vote anyone, even though they thought they couldn’t. The Electoral Commission does its best, but we fail massively at educating voters on our basic systems, before they’re old enough to vote.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4385 posts Report Reply

  • Legal Beagle: Election 2014: The Special…, in reply to Kevin McCready,

    What would happen if a roll (there are more than 10 of them at busy Voting Places) goes missing for an hour or two?

    This is insane. It would be incredibly obvious if a roll went missing. One is issued to each Issuing Officer. Without the roll, they can't issue votes. You make it sound like rolls are just lying around all over the place, but if you've scrutineered, you absolutely know that's not the case. And if you did get your hands on a roll without any IO or scrutineer noticing, what would you do with it? I'm seriously asking. What would you do with it?

    I actually know from experience what happens when a ballot pad "goes missing" (it wasn't actually missing). You really don't have a clue what you're talking about.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4385 posts Report Reply

  • Hard News: The sole party of government, in reply to Alfie,

    Do you have a reference for that, Mike?

    Here you go.

    the yes campaign itself had intervened on Twitter on Thursday night to reassure voters that there was nothing awry with the Dundee footage.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4385 posts Report Reply

  • Hard News: The sole party of government, in reply to Not The Messiah,

    Are there many people these days without ID of some sort? ( I don’t know ) I would have thought pretty much everyone would have something – drivers licence seems a good start?

    Thing is, voting ID laws always disenfranchise people, and disproportionately those people are poor and brown. That's why the Republicans love them so much. So surely, there should have to be an actual problem with voter fraud before you'd do that? We have a fantastic culture of making it as easy as possible for people to vote, and I'd hate to lose that.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4385 posts Report Reply

  • Hard News: The sole party of government, in reply to Not The Messiah,

    it strikes me as odd that you do not need to show any ID when voting

    Do you think people who don't have ID shouldn't be able to vote?

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4385 posts Report Reply

  • Hard News: The sole party of government, in reply to David Hood,

    Electorates where National’s vote went up:
    “Hutt South” “Port Hills”

    Huh. And the main reason it went up in Port Hills would be the boundary changes, which were designed to do exactly that.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4385 posts Report Reply

  • Hard News: The sole party of government, in reply to Alfie,

    I’ve voted in more than ten elections now and I’ve never observed the type of behaviour you describe.

    So let's be generous and say, over all that time, about three hours in a voting place? So, about 1/3 of one voting day?

    Maybe I’ve always lived in nice neighbourhoods

    Because abuse never happens in nice neighbourhoods.

    I accept your point that online voting would make that type of influence easier for an abuser.

    I really wish you'd stop there. Because that point is inarguable. Easier. Not suddenly possibly for the first time, but far, far easier. So now the question you have to ask isn't "But what about *hypothetical*?" It's "Do I consider a possible theoretical rise in voter turnout worth chucking those women under the electronic voting bus?" It's a pretty simple question.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4385 posts Report Reply

  • Hard News: The sole party of government, in reply to Alfie,

    That little barcode on your voting form already has your name and address.

    Sure, because we knew exactly when and where you were going to come in, and exactly which ballot paper you were going to use, and pre-printed it that way.It's eerie.

    Your ballot paper has a number, under the black sticker. That number matches the stub, which has your page and line number written on it by your issuing officer - in biro. With that ballot paper, and the stub, and a copy of the electoral roll, you could find out who cast a particular vote. You'd have to find the ballot paper you wanted first, of course, and then separately find the pad with the stub, and then corrupt the Electoral Commission...

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4385 posts Report Reply

  • Hard News: The sole party of government, in reply to Alfie,

    Who’s to say that your dominant male isn’t already collecting the entire family’s EasyVote cards and tripping around a few polling booths with his mates?

    One of whom is convincingly dressed as his wife, right?

    Your tone makes me assume that for you, abuse is something very abstract, something it's okay to play thought-experiment hypotheticals with. You've just described a far more complicated process, and one that would be observed by multiple people, AND require a conspiracy. That's not, by and large, how domestic abuse happens. Mostly, abusers don't abuse while other people are watching.

    On Saturday, I had a guy moved away from standing over his wife while she voted. This isn't abstract. That woman is real, and your system would disenfranchise her and enable her abuser. But *handwave*, right?

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4385 posts Report Reply

  • Hard News: The sole party of government, in reply to Gary Young,

    Is RealMe sophisticated enough to identify the actual person logged on and using the computer?

    Absolutely not. RealMe even, by default, leaves your password typed in to that field so you just have to push "log in".

    Now, go through the process of applying for RealMe, and assume you don't have a driver's licence or a passport.Then come back and tell me how much easier than enrolling to vote that was.

    Abuse is, to me, the number one problem with on-line voting, and I haven't seen any advocates address it. The privacy of the polling booth is essential to a secret ballot, and electoral staff enforce it. The privacy of your own home is where people are the most vulnerable.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4385 posts Report Reply

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