Posts by Russell Brown

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  • Speaker: A Disorderly Brexit, in reply to Ben Austin,

    They did what they could via backchannels to assist us. However, they were constrained as to what they could give to us on a formal basis.

    So ... constrained by the party leadership? Sheeit.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 21134 posts Report Reply

  • Speaker: A Disorderly Brexit, in reply to Ben Austin,

    Thanks for the info, Ben, that's interesting.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 21134 posts Report Reply

  • Speaker: A Disorderly Brexit,

    I Storyfied a pretty compelling stream of tweets from a Northern Irishman called Shocko on the hellish problems the Leave vote poses for his country.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 21134 posts Report Reply

  • Speaker: A Disorderly Brexit, in reply to John Palethorpe,

    It’s taken him less than 24 hours to do it without being conciliatory to them. All those resignation letters, all that media time, and he’s gone nowhere and shuffled them off to the backbench. G’wan the boy Corbs.

    The timing of the coup attempt is clearly unhelpful and it's clearly at least partly about things other than the referendum.

    But does it not seem that Corbyn was a half-hearted-to-useless campaigner on an issue he was clearly not committed to? Shouldn't he have campaigned properly or tried to win the the argument to align Labour with Leave (which would, to be fair, have been a bloody debacle). I'm a bit lost as to what's good about him right now.

    Jonathan Freedland points out the young voters who helped secure him the leadership were far more passionate about Remaining than Corbyn. And argues that Corbyn was worse than half-hearted:

    Yet this weekend provided evidence of something much more serious. The BBC’s Laura Kuenssberg and others have seen the documents which prove that Corbyn and his top team were guilty of much worse than a lack of enthusiasm. They engaged in “deliberate sabotage” of the remain campaign. They pulled out of critical media appearances at the last minute, or else passed up media opportunities to make the case against Brexit; they removed pro-EU lines from speeches; they repeatedly diluted the official Labour position of support for in.

    My own reporting, speaking to those involved with the in campaign, confirms this account, as does Phil Wilson MP, parliamentary chair of Labour In For Britain. At those moments of the campaign when Labour was to be given the floor, the party had either prepared nothing or used its platform to attack the Tories fronting the remain campaign, rubbishing George Osborne’s warnings of the economic consequences of Brexit for example. There were plans for a dramatic intervention by all Labour’s leaders – past and present – to stand together and call for remain, designed to ram home to Labour supporters where their party stood. But that was scuppered by Corbyn’s refusal to be associated, even indirectly, with Tony Blair. One idea would have seen Blair in Belfast, Gordon Brown in Glasgow, Neil Kinnock in Cardiff and Jeremy Corbyn in England – but Team Corbyn said no to that and every other version of the plan.

    What exactly was going on here?

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 21134 posts Report Reply

  • Speaker: A Disorderly Brexit,

    The Guardian's 10 Britons who voted Leave and why article is interesting.

    They're clearly not terrible people, but I think quite a few hopes are going to be dashed.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 21134 posts Report Reply

  • Polity: Four cents on Brexit, Fonterra,…,

    But there’s a big flipside to this, which a very smart trade professional talked me through the other day. A good proportion of Fonterra’s current access to EU markets was granted as a continental concession in the 1973 negotiations for the UK’s EEC membership. And this 1973 agreement is one of the most important things Brexit will pick apart.

    Holy shit.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 21134 posts Report Reply

  • Speaker: A Disorderly Brexit, in reply to Rich of Observationz,

    Does this have to be done before the UK gives notice to quit? And is the EU entitled to demand that, since the UK’s constitution requires a vote of parliament, that such a vote take place?

    It's rather disappointing that no one seems to have thought about all this in advance ...

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 21134 posts Report Reply

  • Speaker: A Disorderly Brexit, in reply to John Palethorpe,

    Ah, there’s more to that though, isn’t there? Respecting the result and being happy with your choice are two different things.

    Yes. One would think that there are many Remain voters unwilling to go along with a fantasy petition too.

    One of the few laughs has been the revelation that the petition was actually started by one of the Leave campaigners hoping for a do-over when it seemed the result wasn't going to go their way.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 21134 posts Report Reply

  • Speaker: A Disorderly Brexit,

    Attachment

    Wow. Buyers' remorse is pretty strong amongst Daily Mail readers at the moment.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 21134 posts Report Reply

  • Speaker: A Disorderly Brexit, in reply to daleaway,

    Reminds one uncomfortably of the slogan on the side of Winston Peter’s campaign bus : Send them a message. Well, the message was sent, and now the Brits have learned to be careful what they wish for.

    Which is why the “Ha ha, death throes of neoliberalism” response annoys me.

    The immediate result will be a changing of the guard in government, with the most horrible and illiberal of the Tories moving into positions of power. It’s very much “be careful what you wish for”.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 21134 posts Report Reply

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