Southerly by David Haywood

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Southerly: Ian Wishart's 'Absolute Power: The Helen Clark Years' Rewritten as a One-act Play in the Style of Noël Coward's 'Brief Encounter'

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  • Shep Cheyenne,

    What we always knew about Kirk & Spock.

    Since Oct 2007 • 927 posts Report Reply

  • Emma Hart,

    What we always knew about Kirk & Spock.

    I hadn't seen that particular one before. It was both funny and deeply disturbing.

    Dear David,

    I apologise sincerely for what I've done to your thread.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4369 posts Report Reply

  • daleaway,

    During the war years, Coward's themes were duty, loyalty, and the importance of keeping the home fires burning. His heroes got to do manly heroics in the military, and his heroines stood staunchly by their men. Brief Encounter should be viewed in this context: it's a hymn to loyalty and self-denial, to weathering storms and staying on a steady course.

    Coward's previous world-weariness and frivolity were set aside for the duration. MI5 asked him to establish their wartime Paris office, and he was living in Paris working for the British war effort while the rest of the world thought he was idling life away on the Riviera.

    A much underrated and misread chap. It's all there in his letters, just published.

    Since Jul 2007 • 178 posts Report Reply

  • Craig Ranapia,

    Is there another genre people get SO exercised about, politically?

    Well, there's an argument that genre fiction is where you get those uncomfortable question under the radar in way 'mainstream' culture can't is precisely because it's marginalised as 'unrealistic' or 'lowbrow'. While I'd never claim Isaac Asimov as a proto-feminist, back in the 40's Susan Calvin -- a rather formidable and misanthropic 'robopsychologist' who was more interested in her work than scoring a husband -- wasn't exactly your kitset space-bimbo.

    But since we're getting into Kirk Spock slash, let's just hope that J.J. Abrams isn't going there with Star Trek XI. I find the thought of seeing Uhura in regulation mini-skirt and kinky boots again depressing enough. ("Pants. On women. the final frontier.") :)

    North Shore, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 12040 posts Report Reply

  • Emma Hart,

    Well, there's an argument that genre fiction is where you get those uncomfortable question under the radar in way 'mainstream' culture can't is precisely because it's marginalised as 'unrealistic' or 'lowbrow'.

    Heh, where were you when I was trying to convince the English Dept that I could do my thesis on the development of Science-Fiction in Victorian England contrasted with France and the US in the same period? ("Science-Fiction. You mean... fiction abut science?")

    While I'd never claim Isaac Asimov as a proto-feminist, back in the 40's Susan Calvin -- a rather formidable and misanthropic 'robopsychologist' who was more interested in her work than scoring a husband -- wasn't exactly your kitset space-bimbo.

    I loved her so much when I was a teenager. Of course, now I want a kitset space-bimbo.

    I find the thought of seeing Uhura in regulation mini-skirt and kinky boots again depressing enough.

    So conflicted. Mini skirt and go-go boots = nomnomnomnom. Woman in position of authority constantly having to yank skirt over arse = do not want.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4369 posts Report Reply

  • Robyn Gallagher,

    For some reason, in my mind, 'dude' is non-gender specific. No offence intended, I assure you!

    It breaks my heart everytime a man calls me "dude". It seems like he's saying that he thinks of me as a man, and my femaleness is being ignored, which is horrible.

    Raglan • Since Nov 2006 • 1865 posts Report Reply

  • Danielle,

    So conflicted. Mini skirt and go-go boots = nomnomnomnom. Woman in position of authority constantly having to yank skirt over arse = do not want.

    Wordy McWord. Although despite all that fine rhetoric about equality and fraternity and interracial harmony, Star Trek Mk 1 was waaaaay sexist: they gave Uhura the spacecraft equivalent of a receptionist's job. And look at poor old Nurse Chapel! Homegirl was shagging Gene Roddenberry in real life and still only got to be the nurse under Bones, making pathetic mooneyes at Spock at every opportunity! (I do have to undermine my own point by saying that she's also the voice of the ship's computer, which is admittedly pretty cool.)

    Ahem. Yeah, I love TOS. A lot. It's Cheese! In! Spaaaaaace!

    (I am pro-being-called-dude, though. Kinda like it.)

    Charo World. Cuchi-cuchi!… • Since Nov 2006 • 3661 posts Report Reply

  • Emma Hart,

    It breaks my heart everytime a man calls me "dude". It seems like he's saying that he thinks of me as a man, and my femaleness is being ignored, which is horrible.

    Whereas I like it. To me it's friendly and inclusive and warm. How do you feel about 'guy', as in 'are you guys coming over on Sunday?'? Because I use that all the time in a non-gender-specific way. Usually because, when I'm talking to a group of friends, it will include both genders.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4369 posts Report Reply

  • Emma Hart,

    Star Trek Mk 1 was waaaaay sexist: they gave Uhura the spacecraft equivalent of a receptionist's job

    They sorta tried. There was an episode where the script originally called for Uhura to be left in charge of the bridge while the away team got, I dunno, kidnapped or something. Paramount went apeshit and demanded it be rewritten.

    Still, Turnabout Intruder? Where the woman swaps bodies with Kirk because she wants to be a captain and women can't be captains becaue they cry and their mascara runs and the wind blows up their skirts? Hugely sexist. Shatner, portraying being possessed by a woman, sort of minces around on the verge of tears a lot. Guilty pleasures.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4369 posts Report Reply

  • Shep Cheyenne,

    Sci-Fi sexism has to be Dr Who & the bevy of hotpants & boots much younger ladies he ran around the cosmos with. I was always disapointed with Dr Who when he had male companions, or was Dr Who the 1st bisexual on TV?

    When I was a solider we always reffered to the guy who made the tea, coffee, or meals, as "brew bitch". This was in all male company & I acknowledge totally misogynistic, but never used to address the few women who were in our unit.

    The women who were with us were 'above average' in role and intelligence (medics etc) and were respected as such.

    Not so sure these days now women are able to go in all areas as to what their treatment maybe.

    As Sci-Fi mirrors todays society Starship Troopers is the only Sci-Fi where women are taking on warrior roles and treated as equals, as in the shower sceen.

    Does Battle Star Gallactica have female marines?

    Since Oct 2007 • 927 posts Report Reply

  • B Jones,

    Not sure about marines as they're used on BSG (as cookie cutter soldiers called to arrest various of the principals when they've annoyed President Roslin), but among the regular characters there are female fighter pilots, transport pilots, technicians, politicians, aides, spiritual leaders, a President and previously, an Admiral.

    When the re-imagined series first aired, there was a great deal of wigging out among fans of the old over the fact that Starbuck and Boomer were now female characters.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 814 posts Report Reply

  • Craig Ranapia,

    [...] among the regular characters there are female fighter pilots, transport pilots, technicians, politicians, aides, spiritual leaders, a President and previously, an Admiral.

    And one of the grimmer jokes in the mini-series was that after Laura Roslin suddenly jumps forty seven places in the line of succession, nobody bats an eye at a woman being president. What they find hard to get their heads around is that they're now taking orders from the Secretary of Education. :)

    Still, it's rather interesting that in BSG gender and ethnicity just aren't issues. Class is, and too a lesser extent religion -- both subject that are a wee bit touchy to address head on in mainstream American television.

    North Shore, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 12040 posts Report Reply

  • Evans,

    So what do we make of the absolute power of the new National Government.

    Change and provocation everywhere, and parliament has barely sat.

    Warning signs galore

    Auckland • Since Mar 2009 • 1 posts Report Reply

  • Jackie Clark,

    Wonderful, David. Volvo's colliding? Reminds me of a Frankie Goes to Hollywood lyric.

    Mt Eden, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3123 posts Report Reply

  • Craig Ranapia,

    So what do we make of the absolute power of the new National Government.

    Change and provocation everywhere, and parliament has barely sat.

    Warning signs galore

    Your bridge has been privatised.

    North Shore, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 12040 posts Report Reply

  • Sam F,

    Your bridge has been privatised.

    I lol'd.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1566 posts Report Reply

  • DeepRed,

    Your bridge has been privatised.

    I lol'd.

    Special Offer! Bridge toll down to $450 one-way! But hurry, this offer won't last!

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 4365 posts Report Reply

  • Sam F,

    Special Offer! Bridge toll down to $450 one-way! But hurry, this offer won't last!

    Rubicon Industries?

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1566 posts Report Reply

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