Hard News by Russell Brown

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Hard News: Blog About Cat

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  • Scott A,

    Heh, "gelded the tomcat out of him?" Clearly not, as this story shows gelded toms fight just as much as any other cat, just over different things.

    I recognise this story; when I moved house a few years back into a very cat-ridden cul-de-sac it was a tough first year for my big burly dog-like gelded boy; he was moving into an area dominated by a big black tomcat as well as lots of other cats competing for space.

    Quite a few scrapes and expensive vet bills occured, but now he's become the big black dominant cat in the neighbour; which seems to have reduced the number of fights overall down this way. After all, a gelded tom still fights, just over different things...

    The wilds of Kingston, We… • Since May 2009 • 118 posts Report Reply

  • DeepRed,

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 4060 posts Report Reply

  • Carol Stewart,

    Can you also give tips on how non-gardeners can grow things in Wellington's gales

    We grew potatoes in tyres (free from Firestone, they're happy to give you as many as you can stuff into your car) for a sciency project. I've re-used the tyres for growing herbs and it works a treat - seems to keep the plants well protected. I should add that we live in a horticulturally un-propitious place too - atop Brooklyn hill.

    Christchurch • Since Jul 2008 • 633 posts Report Reply

  • Bart Janssen,

    Yay for more cat blogs - except you need pictures.

    Will make a beeline for the lap of whoever in the house is most unlikely to want him

    Isn't this a truism when it comes to cats? :)

    Cats, like most animals, see eye contact as threatening. Humans are the reverse. So cat lovers will look directly at the cat, who decides s/he won't have a bar of it. Cat haters will avoid eye contact, signaling to the cat that they are not hostile and hence have a perfectly good lap.

    Maine coons are bred in NZ

    Our cat is also 95% indoors, but that's because she is a woos. She also has cancer and has monthly blood tests and daily pills. But after 18 years she is a family member and gets as much love and care as any other family member regardless of the cost.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3221 posts Report Reply

  • Jake Pollock,

    I've never understood how they know in a group of people which one is the allergic one, and why they do it?

    Because, for a cat, squinting ones eyes and looking away is a sign of pleasure or contentment. Whereas widening ones eyes is seen as a threat. For humans the meanings of these expressions are the other way around, so when the allergic person squints at the cat, the cat takes it as an invitation, and when the person who wants the cat widens their eyes, the cat displays indifference and goes elsewhere.

    It's knowledge, bro.

    ETA: What Bart said.

    Raumati South • Since Nov 2006 • 489 posts Report Reply

  • Joanna,

    Ah, Pete -- you've rather missed the pointed, haven't you?

    Although actually Russell, you should apologise for giving me a hell of a scare. When I saw the title of this post, my first thought was that it was going to be along the lines of Damian's "No Pussy Blues" and stories about cats dying are the worst thing in the world to read because it's pretty much what I'm most terrified about in my life.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 723 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    Although actually Russell, you should apologise for giving me a hell of a scare.

    Oh, sorry. Colin is definitely very much alive and trying to rest his kitty butt on my desk. But I know what you mean about cats dying. Shudder.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 18512 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    Because, for a cat, squinting ones eyes and looking away is a sign of pleasure or contentment. Whereas widening ones eyes is seen as a threat.

    Not to disappoint the lovely creatures, I widen my eyes at them and then I attack them.

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7320 posts Report Reply

  • Jake Pollock,

    If you want your attack to be more successful, you should squint in order to lull them into a false sense of security.

    Raumati South • Since Nov 2006 • 489 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    I'm a sporting sort of fellow.

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7320 posts Report Reply

  • Emma Hart,

    Because, for a cat, squinting ones eyes and looking away is a sign of pleasure or contentment

    Wait a minute, so when my cat gives me 'that look' he's actually happy?

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4328 posts Report Reply

  • Jake Pollock,

    Yep. Squint back, and turn your head away. He'll approach you, or at least lay his head down.

    Raumati South • Since Nov 2006 • 489 posts Report Reply

  • Isabel Hitchings,

    Either happy or plotting your downfall. Not that there's much difference from a feline viewpoint.

    Christchurch • Since Jul 2007 • 703 posts Report Reply

  • recordari,

    For years I have been a victim of misguided fluffy affection, with subsequent nasal distress.

    The tables have now turned. Hmm, am I as sporting as Gio? 'Here kitty kitty' [Squints].

    AUCKLAND • Since Dec 2009 • 2607 posts Report Reply

  • 3410,

    Cats, like most animals, see eye contact as threatening. Humans are the reverse.

    Speak for yourself!
    :)

    Auckland • Since Jan 2007 • 2618 posts Report Reply

  • Grace Dalley,

    There are some humans who don't smile much with their mouths but whose eyes crinkle up instead. "Eye-smiles" are supposed to be impossible to fake, unlike toothy grins. After many years around various cats I'm quite inclined to squint my eyes at people I like, which may or may not be correctly interpreted. |-)

    Either happy or plotting your downfall. Not that there's much difference from a feline viewpoint.

    Oh so true. |-) [does the squinty smiley freak you out?]

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2008 • 138 posts Report Reply

  • Lucy Stewart,

    Fiercely independent it would sleep in one of two places; the laundry room cupboard or in my bed at night at my feet. It would jump up and half asleep I'd lift the covers so it could crawl down to my feet... weird.

    Ours will sleep nowhere but at the foot of the bed. She won't come more than halfway up, mind (unless it's to wake me up in the weekend when I fail to provide food at the usual hour) but she won't sleep anywhere else.

    She's quite dog-like, too; she strongly prefers to be around humans and follows us from room to room, always runs to meet us when we come home in the evening, that sort of thing. Doesn't like water at *all*, though - in fact, she watches us in the shower to make sure we're not drowning.

    Amherst, MA • Since Nov 2006 • 2092 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    Tim Welch, Julian Melville, Bart Janssen - many thanks for the Maine Coon feedback (I thought I'd bookmarked most ANZ Maine Coon breeder but didnt have that one, Bart.)

    And Jake Pollock - thanks for adding to my - somewhat limited - knowledge of cats...

    Most of the whanau have cats, but they tend to be either Siamese or -more usually- Burmese, or nice tabbies from the SPCA.

    The last time I was in the USA (about 15 years ago), I met a Maine Coon and thought, one of these days I will share my place with one like you: he was a cat of considerable presence, and I dont mean just size-wise. I loved the fact that he enjoyed water, was not a bird-hunter (according to the person who's place he shared) and was gifted with a kind of warm reticence/reserve.

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Jackie Clark,

    Well maybe that's your solution, Islander - in a place like the Big O where the wildlife is abundant, it would make sense to get a cat like that......

    Mt Eden, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3121 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    in fact, she watches us in the shower to make sure we're not drowning.

    Writing 'bout cool pets.If I suggest a shower to my dog Stella, she goes and sits in the shower and waits to have it turned on. She's soo cool. :)
    Stella

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 5923 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    and was gifted with a kind of warm reticence/reserve

    I love that Colin -- who has a bit of Abyssinian or something in him -- almost never mews. When he does, you know it's serious.

    He has instead learned to ask to be let out by gently poking at stuff on the chest of drawers by the door and looking at me. He does the same thing with my bedside table in the middle of the night, which ain't so good.

    I have also pretty much got him to understand what "Do you want to go out?" means. Well, it seems to work ...

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 18512 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    what "Do you want to go out?" means. Well, it seems to work ...

    Oh, they know fer sure.To attract attention Stella will strum the guitar with her tail, use tail to fan across the bamboo curtain, and jump onto and perch on the bed. all this in the middle of the night. Once you are awake, she nips out to the back door and bangs or barks to go out and repeats to come back in.She also is known to thump one paw. and the full Mutley laugh. She does make me laugh every day. :)

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 5923 posts Report Reply

  • 3410,

    the full Mutley laugh.

    aka the "precious pup" laugh

    (which is what my mum used to call me as a child, due to my asthmatic guffaws).

    Auckland • Since Jan 2007 • 2618 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    shower

    admiring the skillful segue to dogginess in the cat thread, Sofie

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16275 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    ;)

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 5923 posts Report Reply

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