Hard News by Russell Brown

Read Post

Hard News: Ideology for Evidence

215 Responses

First ←Older Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 9 Newer→ Last

  • Russell Brown,

    Gelato.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 19019 posts Report Reply

  • HORansome,

    Dammit. Now I want gelato and the campus gelataria (which, if it isn't a word, is now) is closed.

    Tāmaki Makaurau • Since Sep 2008 • 424 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    It is a word and it's spelt Gelateria.

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7390 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    I include the meat & wool sectors amongst the retards

    Then you'll guess where the demand for sick day crackdowns comes from.

    Mr Key said this issue had been raised with him, and it affected the meat industry.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16838 posts Report Reply

  • HORansome,

    Gio, I'm saving my 'e's for later.

    Tāmaki Makaurau • Since Sep 2008 • 424 posts Report Reply

  • chris,

    That sick day proposal is shocking, I worked for a company once with that condition and after waiting in a clinic for an hour to see a doctor to sign a certificate verifying I had the flu, I ended up worse for wear than if I had just stayed in bed. There's a healthy black market in China for those doctor's certificates. Requiring certificates does less for maintaining a healthy workforce, then allowing one off sick days.

    中国 • Since Jan 2010 • 900 posts Report Reply

  • Deborah,

    Fantastic news from the article Sacha linked to: Sick leave change 'not major'

    She [Minister of Labour] disagreed with Ms Turei that there was no problem that needed fixing, saying: "The issue has been raised with us"

    So it turns out that all you need to do to get some government action is to raise an issue with them. Anyone want to start a list of issues we could raise?

    Manawatu City • Since Nov 2006 • 1326 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    You do need to be a donor or fellow traveller as well

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16838 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    Gio, I'm saving my 'e's for later.

    See you at Spy bar.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 19019 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    Oh and this by the Herald's employment law columnist may interest Graeme:

    However, the practical reality is that if an employer wants to hire an employee and include a trial period in the employment agreement, and the employee refuses to consent to the inclusion of the trial period, the employer is unlikely proceed with the offer and instead, make an offer to another applicant who is willing to agree to a trial period.

    So an applicant can specify they don't want a trial period in their employment agreement - but they may not get the role.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16838 posts Report Reply

  • chris,

    because we is after all but actors.

    中国 • Since Jan 2010 • 900 posts Report Reply

  • Ben Austin,

    In the UK the first 12 months of employment lacks the protection of unfair dismissal rights, so it is relatively easy to dismiss an employee in that period. This is of course subject to discrimination law (Equality Act just passed before the election, to consolidate such) and pay claims.

    The three month probation rule is simply one of custom and practice, which is usually followed up by the contract or letter of offer. By virtue of the contract is is also quite possible to opt out of disciplinary and grievance procedures in that first 12 months.

    It is reasonably common to dismiss an employee without reason at about month 10 or 11 on the basis of the above. The long and the short of it is that if an employee wants to take action in that first 12 months they must find a pay or discrimination claim or breach of contract.

    London • Since Nov 2006 • 897 posts Report Reply

  • Phil Lyth,

    PASers be ribbin'

    Surely a contender for a top 10 placing in Word of the Year 2010.

    And, noting that the Word of the Year has averaged three-words-long in recent years, we can observe it is like Paul Hlmes, perfectly formed.

    Phil
    who one day will learn not to take Danielle and others seriously all the time

    Wellington • Since Apr 2009 • 443 posts Report Reply

  • Phil Lyth,

    So an applicant can specify they don't want a trial period in their employment agreement - but they may not get the role.

    Oh for a New Zealand where there are more jobs than people available. Then businesses would have to, you know, compete, in a free market, to attract employees.

    It would surely be Roger Kerr's idea of heaven.

    Wellington • Since Apr 2009 • 443 posts Report Reply

  • chris,

    For numerous reasons, trial periods should be the employer's prerogative, the Government should ideally be focusing their attentions on writing fine print to protect potential casualties such as octopusgrrl's dear friend.

    中国 • Since Jan 2010 • 900 posts Report Reply

  • Phil Lyth,

    There's a healthy black market in China for those doctor's certificates.

    Well there's an opportunity for Farrer Slater Ltd (and others) to start up an enterprise selling medical certificates through the interweb.

    No need for a doctor to have seen the person. Nor indeed to be a registered medical practictioner in NZ. Just collect $200 for passing Go, and the employer pays. What a wonderful business model.

    Wellington • Since Apr 2009 • 443 posts Report Reply

  • chris,

    Yeah, not recommended, tabling this seems as good an indication as any that those in the National Party have 'trust issues' with the working classes.

    中国 • Since Jan 2010 • 900 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    The "evidence" appears to have further basic flaws, says Frogblog.

    The quantitative research using the Department of Labour’s employer database involved an initial short phone call, with a request to complete a follow-up on-line or postal survey.

    But only 23% of the 3352 employers the DoL attempted to contact actually completed the follow-up survey, and those who did were self-selected.

    The sampling bias introduced by that selection method makes the quantitative research almost worthless – employers with strong views supportive of trial periods are obviously going to be more likely to respond.

    This govt decided against proper monitoring when they introduced the policy (and officials advised it would be hard to make sense of) and now their acolytes are complaining on blogs that those who oppose it aren't producing evidence. Reminiscent of Thatcher eliminating poverty data - problem, what problem?

    However, a regular commenter from the right on The Standard makes a good point.

    Surely one needs to question the Unions strategy over all of this. They knew National would eventually make the 90 day Bill available to all employers. They disagreed with it when it was first implemented and clearly stated they’d have a name and shame record kept. Were they all that naive that they the Unions simply forgot about it all?

    Because with National indeed making the 90 day fire-at-will available to all employers You would think the Unions would actually show evidence of how troubling this will be for employees. And while I support the 90-day law I have no doubt many employers abused the system. Hence, why the fuck don’t the Unions have more evidence about such an abuse.

    Of course banning unions from workplaces unless employers agree will be a good way to prevent any of those 'worse work stories' getting out.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16838 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    So, when you call in sick, the sick person goes to doc. There seems to be the assumption (from National) that the boss will pay up front so as not to cause difficulty with reimbursements. Bollocks. By the time you go get money from the boss, go to the doc, you may as well stay at work sick. That is a probable outcome. I guess if there is no doctor's certificate, (just try fit in an appointment that day and if you can get out of bed) you may be fired without explanation, or have sick day become holiday used. Another probable outcome.
    It's always bollocks with this lot.How much more can they manipulate out of the everyday person . Nasty.
    I know when I was in management, no money was ever available to take out of the till.

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6320 posts Report Reply

  • Tony Parker,

    So it really does discourage people taking risks with their employment and moving into new fields, physical locations.

    I think this will be a consequence that hasn't really been explored. In my profession I can see teachers staying put in their schools for a long time rather than risk applying for a new position and then finding they don't fit. Then there's the possibility some children could have 3 teachers in one year. Both scenarios are long shots but could happen and are not good for education.
    And doing a bit of a cross post here is anyone else becoming sickened by the matey relationship Key (thinks he) has with Richie M and the rest of the AB's. I know they're playing well but I'm starting to hope we don't win the World Cup next year because the Nats will ride it all the way to the polls.

    Napier • Since Nov 2008 • 232 posts Report Reply

  • Logan O'Callahan,

    What sort of medical certificate can you get after the fact?

    Since Apr 2008 • 70 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    Autopsy?

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7390 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    Autopsy?

    May as well be. Have you ever tried to get tests recommended to and by, your doctor, if he suspects your ailment to require tests? They have 6 months to get in touch, via public health system.Does that make it useless legislation?

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6320 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    Just the usual pattern for these clowns of announcing policy without first checking it can work.

    General Practice New Zealand chairwoman Bev O'Keefe said the change could put pressure on medical centres.

    "The issue for general practice is how we accommodate all those people who need to claim medical certificates because they will need to be seen and assessed which means they are going to impact on what is already the heavy workload of general practice.

    "One thing we are not happy to do is to furnish medical certificates without seeing people because that's just hearsay."
    ...


    Dr O'Keefe said another practical issue would be whether people would be able to get the appointment within three days of taking a sick day and may need to take time off work to do it.

    "There are some logistic issues around that. but I guess that's something we have to address because if this is going to become the law then we need to make sure that people can in fact get access to the medical certificates that they require when they need them and that is going to put some pressure on the system."

    That's OK, I'm sure they can fire some health policy or childcare workers to make up the shortfall in funds. Or maybe this is the part of the policy that they'll back down from so people don't notice them keeping the rest?

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16838 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    Oh and the Greens at least ran a quick survey of 40 GPs.

    25 / 40 said not today
    12 / 40 said today
    3 / 40 said we may be able to squeeze you in

    1 day wait to see doctor at 12 places
    2 day wait to see doctor at 2 places
    4 day wait to see doctor at 1 place

    8 / 40 doctors had closed their books to new patients

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16838 posts Report Reply

First ←Older Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 9 Newer→ Last

Post your response…

Please sign in using your Public Address credentials…

Login

You may also create an account or retrieve your password.