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  • Julie Cross, in reply to David Hood,

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    Flying Spaghetti Monster bread

    Awesomeness.

    My neighbour's figs and bananas. The rosellas get em first.

    Australia • Since Nov 2011 • 120 posts Report Reply

  • Julie Cross, in reply to JacksonP,

    It being the season here, I wonder if anyone has any Feijoa recipes and photos? ;-)

    well, um, yeah as you know I have a few...

    What do you do with them: stew/bake/saute in butter?

    You might be surprised! I have a confession about an obsession... http://feijoafeijoa.wordpress.com

    Australia • Since Nov 2011 • 120 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie, in reply to Steve Barnes,

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 3353 posts Report Reply

  • Jackie Clark, in reply to Steve Barnes,

    We ate those in my childhood, Steve. We had a few plants in our garden. And we have a couple here, which we have eaten the fruit from. As for fejoa, we didn't have a tree in our backyard where I grew up (our backyard was actually Smale's Quarry, but that's another story) in Takapuna, and I think I may have eaten them as a child but I never liked them. Choko, however, grew wild out the back, and we did eat quite a bit of that. Loved them with cheese sauce. Mmmm.

    Mt Eden, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3122 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

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    Very green beans at Avondale Market.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 18654 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

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    And some green eels …

    I love shopping alongside the Chinese matrons. They're so particular about what they'll buy.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 18654 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes, in reply to Jackie Clark,

    We ate those in my childhood, Steve.

    In Aucks? I have never seen them ripen here, they should be an Orangy Yellow when ripe.

    Choko,

    Yuckity yuk yuk yuk yuk yuk. Right down there with Okra.

    potassium oxalate:

    The Potassium salt of Oxalic Acid found in the leaves of Rhubarb, great for cleaning saucepans, apparently.

    They’re so particular about what they’ll buy.

    But they still buy weeds ;-)
    They also don’t have much in the way of “Quality Control” like we have here to assure us that all is down to the same quality, “looks good tastes like water” so I suppose it’s worth choosing. Those look like Cucumbers but I can’t be sure because all our cucumber are belong to New World Ordering execs and like them, they all look the same..

    The wireless north ;-) • Since Dec 2006 • 4633 posts Report Reply

  • JacksonP, in reply to Julie Cross,

    You might be surprised! I have a confession about an obsession… http://feijoafeijoa.wordpress.com

    Might try some of those this year myself. Thanks for sharing the link.

    It’s how I cope with my coffee addiction. An obsession shared is an obsession halved. Or something.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2011 • 2117 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown, in reply to Steve Barnes,

    They’re so particular about what they’ll buy.

    But they still buy weeds ;-)

    Heh. Otoh, they'll stand there for 10 minutes carefully choosing the best weeds in the bin -- and throwing the others back with something approaching disdain.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 18654 posts Report Reply

  • Chris Waugh, in reply to Russell Brown,

    Heh. Otoh, they’ll stand there for 10 minutes carefully choosing the best weeds in the bin – and throwing the others back with something approaching disdain.

    If they grew up in China, it's from years of practice in markets where you have countless very strong reasons to be very choosy about what you buy.

    Beijing • Since Jan 2007 • 2000 posts Report Reply

  • Alex Efimoff,

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    Three types of home made mustard

    Wellington • Since Dec 2011 • 56 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca, in reply to Alex Efimoff,

    Three types of home made mustard

    Yum, your spoon even looks great. :)

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 5965 posts Report Reply

  • Islander, in reply to Jackie Clark,

    O! We used to have bushes of 'Cape Gooseberries' at Leaver Terrace.
    First up, got them all. (Familial sharing? Not among the kids' bushes - but you trespassed on the adults' lot at your peril...)

    Never encountered plants since.

    Jackson - lovely & evocative -obviously! - photo.

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Islander, in reply to Joe Wylie,

    Ooo! Now I know what I was sold by a kid here in Okarito - he called 'em 'Chilli berries' and they * were* tasty. I had hopes of heat...

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Islander, in reply to David Hood,

    O waua!
    Wonder if I can recreate it in scone - or maybe, damper? - dough?

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Islander, in reply to Steve Barnes,

    I have a Monstera deliciosa that was given by a nephew of my mother's for her second wedding. The shithead she married is thankfully dead, but Mary & the Monstera happily thrive (the latter in my living room.) Never flowered or fruited. Temperature I suspect-

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to Alex Efimoff,

    Three types of home made mustard

    Now there's an idea ( and a choice photo). I made barbecue sauce with green tomatoes two years ago which was received well. For the barbecue-ness I used molasses, garlic and a little chilli, with cumin to get that good stinky-socks depth of flavour.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2568 posts Report Reply

  • Jackie Clark, in reply to Steve Barnes,

    Yes, right here in Auckland, Steve. We used to have magic summers you know. Just the right weather for them.

    Mt Eden, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3122 posts Report Reply

  • Gudrun Gisela, in reply to Joe Wylie,

    What a sight for sore eyes Joe. They are a fine looking specimen.Did you know they float?

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2011 • 890 posts Report Reply

  • Lilith __,

    I have a monstera I was given as just a tiny shoot in a tiny pot some years ago. It rapidly got enormous and was always sending out suckers which often would be several feet long (snaking down the wall or behind the couch) before I noticed. Once one of them climbed into a large bowl that I had just next to the plant, and the sucker went round and round and round the inside.

    One day I decided I had enough of this ambitious plant and wanted to reduce its size, so I tried to trim both branches and roots, but I found both are quite brittle and manged to break most of them. I was left with a small scrap of root terminating in a small stick just above the surface of the potting mix.

    Well I thought that was probably goodnight to the monstera but to my astonishment it soon sprouted and is now getting huge again. I’ve decided it’s actually unkillable!

    Dunedin • Since Jul 2010 • 3413 posts Report Reply

  • David Hood, in reply to Islander,

    Wonder if I can recreate it in scone – or maybe, damper? – dough?

    Any dough firm enough to hold its shape should work fine- that one was a fairly standard hand made dough. I just put it in the oven without a second rise so that it would better hold its shape.
    That said, that particular construction is both easy and hard- the assembly was easy (balls of dough placed together for the body, intermixed with rolls of dough for the tentacles) and was easy for people just to pull apart to eat, the cooking time was hard as the thin tentacles bake much faster than the body (I actually got it a little wrong and it was slightly underdone in the middle). Next time I'll approach it slightly differently.
    For those wanting to give bread sculpting a go, keep in mind that snipping the dough with scissors is an easy way to make scales (I once did a dragon this way) and dough (hopefully soft dough) pushed through a sieve or a garlic press makes hair.

    Dunedin • Since May 2007 • 850 posts Report Reply

  • Islander, in reply to David Hood,

    Thank you David!
    A happy atheist has to have something to offer for the Easter table some of my benighted rellies put up-
    I will send a photo: I expect my FSM will involve cheese, kelp pepper, garlic & chilli-

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Lilith __,

    David the Flying Spaghetti Monster is AMAZING! I wonder if a small steel bowl inverted under the body (making it hollow) would solve the cooking time problem.

    Dunedin • Since Jul 2010 • 3413 posts Report Reply

  • JacksonP,

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    Bread for cheats.

    While no competition for David's monster, we were pretty pleased with this loaf, even though it came out of one of those bread maker thingies. Tasted amazingly good for all that.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2011 • 2117 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel,

    the quality of Myrtaceae

    …3 very lge old (feijoa) trees – fruit never gets eaten

    I put a lot of our crop out on the street
    in a box marked Freeijoas
    they never last long….


    H. P. Loafcraft…

    Flying Spaghetti Monster bread

    a R’yleh Cthulhoaf?
    (it will rise again!)

    looking forward to the
    ‘Pains-of-Shub-Niggurath
    (he said all ‘Poe-faced and Ravenous’…)

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 4622 posts Report Reply

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