Posts by linger

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  • Hard News: Public Address Word of the…,

    Clusterfucked seems to be the natural successor to 2011's munted; the only problem then is, where do we go if 2017 is worse?

    Tokyo • Since Apr 2007 • 1489 posts Report Reply

  • Hard News: Public Address Word of the…,

    tbh not sure I have any words for this absolute fluster-cuck of a year.

    Kaikoura's been clusterfucked (and will be again by central government, if the Chch experience is anything to go by).

    Though the Brexit campaign, the rise of Trump, the fall of the "expert", and the spread of “fake news” appear to be covered by blusterfuck

    Tokyo • Since Apr 2007 • 1489 posts Report Reply

  • Hard News: Greens drug policy 2: the…,

    There’s a huge difference between “a drug you expect people to take” = a drug that people will choose to take regardless of what you think, and “a drug you expect people to take” = a drug that you are recommending a patient should take. “You” (ultimately the government) have a very different level of responsibility in those two cases, so why should the standard of evidence for safety have to be the same?

    Tokyo • Since Apr 2007 • 1489 posts Report Reply

  • Hard News: The fake news problem, in reply to Farmer Green,

    To some extent they are, but the mistake is to see either as a long-term transferrable trait.

    Tokyo • Since Apr 2007 • 1489 posts Report Reply

  • Hard News: The fake news problem, in reply to Farmer Green,

    Not sure how you get to that conclusion from anything said above.
    The propensity for humans to find overly simple solutions to complex problems is hard-wired (driven by economy of effort for likely benefit, which is a recognised environmental selective pressure). Superstition is one possible outcome. And instability and trauma will make people more likely to seek quick solutions, and to believe superstitions.
    The thing is, in many cases, the simple solution works in practice … until it meets a problem for which it is catastrophically wrong.

    Tokyo • Since Apr 2007 • 1489 posts Report Reply

  • Hard News: The fake news problem,

    Yep, “rationality” is definitely far less an inherited trait than culturally transmitted, and both at individual and societal level it’s subject to widespread and marked fluctuations in response to events, hence not genetically transmitted. On the contrary, there is some evidence that long-term traumatic stress, reducing rationality, can be [heritably] (epi)genetically as well as culturally transmitted. Individual and cultural “rationality” is thus in part a product of long-term stability; it can easily be disrupted by temporary instability, and hence cannot itself represent any inherently stable genetic state.
    It is, for example, difficult to imagine that the USA would have sunk to its present level of collective irrationality without the 9/11 attack or some event of similar identity-shattering magnitude.
    It is even harder to believe that rationality would be the most prevalent human trait in the face of planetary-scale turmoil.

    Tokyo • Since Apr 2007 • 1489 posts Report Reply

  • Access: Help needed! Deciphering the…, in reply to Rosemary McDonald,

    The [MoH] [...] ‘system’ [...] has little if any flexibility

    Which in practice makes it a schistem, i.e. brittle and flaky, and not too far removed from something full of sh**.

    Tokyo • Since Apr 2007 • 1489 posts Report Reply

  • Access: Help needed! Deciphering the…, in reply to Angela Hart,

    Re: core staff costs -- my best guess is that the intended calculation is, roughly, (number of assessed support hours) x (number of people required simultaneously), possibly also with some fudge factor for (specialised-skill-dependent payscale required). Which, at least dimensionally, makes some sort of sense.

    Tokyo • Since Apr 2007 • 1489 posts Report Reply

  • Hard News: The fake news problem, in reply to mark taslov,

    The bigger point here is that, if any "meritocratic" limits are to be set on who can qualify to vote in a democracy, then it is essential that those limits be designed so as not to unfairly disadvantage or exclude any group whose lives will be affected by the outcome. In a national election, that's essentially any full-time resident. Such an unbiassed set of limits is near-impossible to achieve, even if those designing and administering those limits have that as their primary goal. (Which was clearly not the case in the Louisiana example above!)

    Tokyo • Since Apr 2007 • 1489 posts Report Reply

  • Speaker: No, there isn’t a popular…, in reply to Rich Lock,

    Dear Sir,
    I must protest in the strongest possible terms the fake statistics used in the above comment: the estimate of "one trillion" is demonstrably out by at least 3 orders of magnitude.

    (Tongue firmly buried in the next person's cheek, lest there be any confusion...)

    Tokyo • Since Apr 2007 • 1489 posts Report Reply

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