Posts by Ross Mason

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  • Hard News: The People's Poet is dead!, in reply to Ian Dalziel,

    How they think Fieldays works is beyond me?

    Feel days. Farmers day: "Gidday, howsit garn?". "Aww mate. Feelin priddy gud."

    Upper Hutt • Since Jun 2007 • 1496 posts Report Reply

  • Southerly: Who was George Hildebrand…,

    Attachment

    Here is the Inquest.

    Post natal depression I think it would be classified. I think she had 4 or 5 under 6years of age by this time. She was 32.

    Upper Hutt • Since Jun 2007 • 1496 posts Report Reply

  • Southerly: Who was George Hildebrand…,

    Attachment

    Papers Past make fascinating reading and one discovers all sorts of family surprises ansd tragedies. These one is about my Great Grandfather’s first wife. Ne Louisa May Batt.

    They did things differently back then. Brutal, and to the point. Here is a column of suicides from the Auckland Star. The jpg are the items from her death. Note the inquest was held the next day.

    Frightening.

    Upper Hutt • Since Jun 2007 • 1496 posts Report Reply

  • Southerly: Who was George Hildebrand…, in reply to David Haywood,

    But your dates of the wedding and Winifred’s birth put paid to my admittedly unworthy hypothesis that Alington may have knocked up his soon-to-be-wife as well.

    Knocked up. A fascinating phrase. The internet never lies so here is an explanation of it's history that might be embellished a bit but, you know, has some semblance of truthiness.

    "A" history of Knocked Up.

    "Knocking" began as a term for serious flirting circa 1800. Originally it was because you were knocking on the maiden's "door" trying to "get in". Understandably, this reference quickly changed to the actual act of "getting in" because beds knock against walls. If you leave your boots on, literally done at that time, you are "knocking boots"- a Southern U.S. term. Around 1813, the term "knocking up her boots" was common. A reference to the "missionary" position. By 1830, "knocked up" began as a reference to what we now know it as today. Sadly, it was a reference to a slave woman who became pregnant. {This can be verified via "Bing" search, and through searches of various history sources for; African-American History, Southern & Western U.S. History, Women's History, etc:}

    Upper Hutt • Since Jun 2007 • 1496 posts Report Reply

  • Southerly: Who was George Hildebrand…, in reply to Dianne Mitchell,

    William “The Lamp” was Mayor of Wichita 1923-1924. He died there. Married Fanny Sheldon and had 2 kids.

    That boy could have ancestors from Wick.....

    His other products were good for cooking along with the lamp. Combined they prevented camp a la black out.

    Upper Hutt • Since Jun 2007 • 1496 posts Report Reply

  • Southerly: Who was George Hildebrand…, in reply to David Haywood,

    Oh, to have children who would just keep their mouths shut and not interrogate the nice lady from the church.

    Carl Sagan/Sasha Sagan

    Upper Hutt • Since Jun 2007 • 1496 posts Report Reply

  • Southerly: Who was George Hildebrand…, in reply to Brent Jackson,

    The additional JP was definitely written by a different hand than the crossed out JP.

    The loops in the "J" and the "P" would be hard to separate them as two different ones. I'll go with my idea still. The big "dots" are a giveaway as well I think. Check the dot in "Geo." in Coleman's signature. Especially the little hook to them.

    Upper Hutt • Since Jun 2007 • 1496 posts Report Reply

  • Southerly: Who was George Hildebrand…, in reply to David Haywood,

    Here I’m not sure I entirely agree with the you…

    This is FUN!

    The Arlngton on the stamp bears the same "flicks and shapes" as other letters in other places. See the way the "ton" in Alington on the stamp is written. The horizontal line that is the "t" cross. This is the same style as "Arlington" in the rest of the note. QED the same person.

    As for "the sum of twenty pounds". An even closer look suggests that this might have been written by Holland!! Check the "n". Subtle differences to the body of the letter. But consistent with Hollands "n" on his name - and the "n" in Pounds. The "s" are completely different too. Especially the ones at the start of words. The "f" is different. The "d" does not have that little left flick at the top either. Nope. IMHO, Different person.

    I'll concede that a third person is there but I offer Holland as the third person who wrote the twenty pounds bit. The strokes look suspiciously the same, the angle of the writing.

    Upper Hutt • Since Jun 2007 • 1496 posts Report Reply

  • Southerly: Who was George Hildebrand…, in reply to David Haywood,

    t was actually a result of the pen needing to be dipped again?

    I think it was a timing issue. Letter written, waited for Hollands signature, then signed and filled in. All 3 may have had to have been in the same place to witness Alington seeing the letter and agreeing to it. He may have been illiterate of course....couldn't write his own name!!

    Upper Hutt • Since Jun 2007 • 1496 posts Report Reply

  • Southerly: Who was George Hildebrand…,

    On reflection……..after the initial excitement…

    What I think is the original letter:

    I _(1)_______Alington of Methven, hereby agree that in consideration of Mrs George Coleman adopting as her own my girl child_________(2)_______, I give up forever all claim to the said child and guarantee that I will do all in my power to prevent the mother of the child knowing where the child is or annoying the child or Mrs Coleman in any way or claiming the child—the said mother having given up all claim to the said child ___(3)________.

    Signed by the said ____(4)_______Alington [____(5)_____]
    In the presence of _(6)________________
    J.P. ____(7)_______

    What I think is different:
    1. George Hildebrand
    2. twenty-three months old
    3. for the sum of (£20) Twenty Pounds
    4. George Hildebrand
    5. George Hildebrand Alington
    6. (me?) John Holland, Clerk in Holy Orders
    7. [George Coleman], JP.

    My revised theory is……
    The original letter is as above.
    1,2,3,4 5 and 7 were written by George Coleman
    6 was by Holland.
    J.P. was crossed out by Coleman once all the signatures had been done to put it closer to his own signature.

    Alington seems to have not signed it at all???

    Chapter 3,4 5 in the saga will follow. No doubt.

    Upper Hutt • Since Jun 2007 • 1496 posts Report Reply

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