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Access: The Driverless Road Ahead

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  • steven crawford,

    I know, that was a pretty corny thing back there, but I did read in New Scientist not so long ago, that micro-dosing is all the thing in Silicon Valley today.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4414 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic,

    No, new tech in itself doesn’t cause job losses. Rentier statists (such as Peter Thiel) that own and control most of the new tech do.

    RNZ Insight: New tech won’t cause mass job losses in NZ – study

    Automation and artificial intelligence may not cause the mass unemployment that is often predicted, according to new research shared with RNZ Insight.

    The study by the AI Forum says many workers will lose their jobs due to technological change, but it suggests new types of employment and government support, mean most people should be able to adapt. But it does warn some individuals could struggle.

    For the full story, tune in to RNZ Insight on Sunday after 8am.

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5430 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford, in reply to Kumara Republic,

    I’ve been thinking about New York Central Park. The designers wanted to reserve that public space so that everyone could meet on an even playing field. It was an egalitarian theory that worked out pretty well. It’s to mitigate some of the stress humans can experience when living in such a massive constructed environment. City’s are technology.

    The big national parks where designed by the same people, the Olmsteds. Again, the big vistas are reserved so we all get an equal chance of keeping our feet on the ground, metaphorically speaking.

    More and more automation is being introduced to our living environments. Facebook is an automation, as is Twitter. Even the book is an automatated narrative. So we look for things to keep us grounded. Garden supply shops know about that, then that gets automation to maximise profits.

    It’s god dammed strenuous to the soul. I make bits of hand made art in defiance, because robots are limited to engineering – there excluded from my privet garden park. The philosophers could say better stuff…

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4414 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4414 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4414 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic, in reply to steven crawford,

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5430 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic,

    Ann Pettifor, one of the few who correctly predicted the Great Recession, further reinforces what I wrote to begin with.

    RNZ Sunday Morning - Economist Ann Pettifor: 'The public are not stupid'

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5430 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic,

    Attachment

    Fun fact: Kurt Vonnegut wrote about these topics in the novel "Player Piano" in 1952. Yes, the same year Helsinki held the Summer Olympics.

    It's long overdue for a movie adaptation, although player pianos are a bit obsolete these days. They've been replaced with autoplay streaming media, so when someone does get round to making the movie, here's what the promo poster might look like.

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5430 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to Kumara Republic,

    Attachment

    It’s long overdue for a movie adaptation

    Apparently Alan Arkin had a go at a screenplay for it...

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7944 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic,

    New Zealand ranks in the bottom third of the OECD for spending on what are known as active labour market policies - government interventions to help people into meaningful new work. The organisation's report last year said Work and Income focuses largely on people receiving benefits, which only includes a minority of people made redundant. "As a result, social assistance and public employment support are reduced to a minimum and act very much as systems of last resort for displaced workers who end up in the welfare system… Displaced workers are, to a large extent, left by their own to find a new job."

    RNZ IN DEPTH 3 Sep 2018 - Why being made redundant in NZ is so tough

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5430 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic,

    Further wisdom from "recovering neo-liberal" Joseph Stiglitz on automation:

    Joseph Stiglitz on artificial intelligence: 'We’re going towards a more divided society'

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5430 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic,

    Also, I missed this one:

    Artificial intelligence: ‘Homo sapiens will be split into a handful of gods and the rest of us’

    Robotisation has reduced the number of working hours needed to make things; but at the same time as workers have been laid off from production lines, new jobs have been created elsewhere, many of them more creative and less dirty. So far, fears of mass layoffs as the machines take over have proven almost as unfounded as those that have always accompanied other great technological leaps forward.

    There is an important caveat to this reassuring picture, however. The relatively low-skilled factory workers who have been displaced by robots are rarely the same people who land up as app developers or analysts, and technological progress is already being blamed for exacerbating inequality, a trend Bank of America Merrill Lynch believes may continue in future.

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5430 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic,

    Apologies for the thread necro, but I’ve finally found the time to post an epilogue. The issues I wrote about in August 2017 are still very much relevant, despite an electoral reprieve both here and overseas.

    The good news: in the middle of last year, I graduated from web dev boot camp after it finally got NZQA approval, and hence student loan approval. It seemed to better suit my style of learning by doing, and it wasn’t as gruelling as first thought.

    The bad news: the bubble seems to have deflated - AFAIK less than 20% of my cohort found work - and that was even before the COVID outbreak. There was no active job placement at the end as I had high hopes for, instead it was little different from a WINZ pep talk. I attended the Summer of Tech internship programme later in the year, but not even a single response back, given there were about 3 applicants to every available internship. The SoT window has since closed as I am no longer a recent graduate. I’ve had piecemeal gig testing work between then and now, although it’s allowed me to work from home. And I’m getting heartily sick of expensive wasted efforts every time I study something.

    I got in touch with the people behind Specialisterne NZ, and it’s still in “development hell”, despite some progress with the Accessibility Tick scheme. I’m also hoping against hope that the re-elected Ardern government hasn’t forgotten about the Future of Work policy it touted not too long ago – the COVID crisis would be the perfect opportunity to put it in the front seat.

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5430 posts Report Reply

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