Busytown by Jolisa Gracewood

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Busytown: A Classical Education: Chapter 4 Going On 5

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  • Lucy Stewart,

    You only got “I” wrong – it’s I-yay not I-way.

    The version I learned in Wellington in the early nineties was most definitely -way after words starting with vowels, not -yay. Ialectalday ifferenceday, aybemay?

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 2105 posts Report Reply

  • sally jones, in reply to Sacha,

    Unsubtle put-down for him. As you were.

    Thanks Sacha, I think it worked.

    Is 'Sacha' a Russian name meaning great leader? Read that somewhere. Kind of fits Sacha Baron Cohen in that case, especially in male beachwear :)

    Auckland • Since Sep 2010 • 179 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to sally jones,

    Sacha is apparently a Eastern European diminutive for Alexander – so it’s like Jamie for James in English. Chosen for other reasons I’m told.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19697 posts Report Reply

  • Lucy Stewart, in reply to sally jones,

    Is ‘Sacha’ a Russian name meaning great leader?

    As Sacha says, "Sasha" is a nickname for Alexander, much as "Natasha" is short for "Natalia", "Vasha" for "Ivan", and so on. Shortening names + -sha is a Slavic language diminutive pattern. But Alexander does mean "defender of men" (though in Greek, not Russian - alexo, defend, + andros, men) and Alexander the Great was pretty much the prototypical great leader, so...yes?

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 2105 posts Report Reply

  • dyan campbell,

    You only got “I” wrong – it’s I-yay not I-way.

    The version I learned in Wellington in the early nineties was most definitely -way after words starting with vowels, not -yay. Ialectalday ifferenceday, aybemay?

    Eery-vay ossibly-pay. Pig Latin

    In words that begin with vowel sounds or silent consonants, the syllable "way" is simply added to the end of the word. In some variants, the syllable "ay" is added, without the "w" in front. Sometimes the vowel will be moved and followed by the syllable "hay".
    another→ another-way or another-ay
    if→ if-way or if-ay
    About→ bout-ahay"

    It looks like these represent regional/international variations. I assumed it was generational (Pig-Latin being a craze among my 64 year old sister's set, back in the 1950s) but as it is much, much older than I thought, I think you're right and the variations are regional. Assinating-fay!

    auckland • Since Dec 2006 • 595 posts Report Reply

  • recordari, in reply to dyan campbell,

    Sinine-away? [sic]

    AUCKLAND • Since Dec 2009 • 2607 posts Report Reply

  • Stephanie Chilcott,

    My lad does, and "WHAT THE!" is heard rather a lot around our house

    I first came across this watching early series of Rove, before John Howard lost the Kirribilly House to live in. I have been giving him the credit ever since! Great expression for all ages.

    Wairarapa • Since Aug 2010 • 4 posts Report Reply

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