Field Theory by Hadyn Green

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Field Theory: Part of the Game

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  • Euan Mason, in reply to BenWilson,

    "It was common when I played waterpolo for penalties to be given for even raising one's eyebrows about a referee's call."

    I would have raised my eyebrows under water.

    Canterbury • Since Jul 2008 • 259 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Euan Mason,

    I would have raised my eyebrows under water.

    You can pretty much yell anything you like underwater and get away with it. It's very therapeutic, actually. Talking audibly underwater is quite an art. You have to do it with your mouth shut.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10641 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Gareth Davidson,

    And it was bloody funny, and bloody good fun.

    Indeed, without profanity and homophobia, you actually have to say something witty. It's quite inspiring to hear people sledging each other with actual wit.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10641 posts Report Reply

  • Geoff Lealand,

    Even more so with underwater hockey? I used to take my daughter to tournaments and it was always very noisy. But not much of a spectator sport.

    Screen & Media Studies, U… • Since Oct 2007 • 2539 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to BenWilson,

    It’s quite inspiring to hear people sledging each other with actual wit.

    And once upon a time that might have even described Parliament....

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7892 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Geoff Lealand,

    I used to take my daughter to tournaments and it was always very noisy. But not much of a spectator sport.

    Noisy? Really? What sort of noise? The signal thingo?

    I played it once. It's certainly engaging when you're in there, but nothing to look at. Very strange sport, most of it involved scrabbling around in a moiling pack, because you can't pass the ball very far and it's extremely difficult to protect a puck when players can come at it from all directions, and the mask limits your field of view and you can't hear anything. The whole aspect of gauging when to breathe was interesting, and the fatigue was quite different to any other sport because it was driven by oxygen deprivation rather than muscular overload. I'd swum quite long distances underwater before (with fins on I recall doing 4 laps of the Teps underwater once, so 100 meters) but it's a whole different thing when you're dashing. It's quite easy to run someone down from the surface, unless they just go for absolute broke, after which they will be shattered, might need 30 seconds to recover from a 20 second oxygen deprived sprint.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10641 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson,

    Here is a good first person perspective on the game. The noise you hear is pretty much all I heard during the whole game. I can imagine if you have players on the side they’d have to yell really loud for you to hear them, though. The guy who got the goal at the end was lurking on the surface for most of the clip, which is how he was able to outsprint everyone to the other end.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10641 posts Report Reply

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