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Speaker: The Strange Tax on Your Internet

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  • Steve Barnes,

    When national launched the UFB project to great fanfare and telling us all that it will deliver us a "Better Future" I had my doubts.
    For a start, I had just gone from a wireless setup courtesy of Woosh, to a proper ADSL line and was more than happy running two or three computers with minimal fuss and frustration and wondered who would need 50 quidzillion gigapoos of data per nano-second,. Couldn't think of anyone, apart from those downloading movies or songs by the truckload of course. The Universities had "Julia" or whatever and the military, presumably, had some quantum jump on the whole caboodle.
    So who would benefit?
    Banks transferring funds? We have all seen movies where the master crim sits at a laptop watching the Swiss account filling up with dollars the way windows indexes files, slowly with a pointless little blue line indicating how much slower your system is under windows 7, for you convenience, but we know all that is bollocks. It takes no longer to transfer a billion dollars than to pay your toll fee for using the State Highway toll tunnel, in fact it is most likely quicker.
    How about Fisher and Paykell sending design specs. to their manufacturing plant in Outer Mongolia or wherever. Yeah Nah, as if a few seconds would make the difference in getting a product to market.
    I did , however, come up with a likely beneficiary, the GCSB.
    It is much easier to intercept a multiplexed data stream over fibre than to have to tap in to all those strands of copper.
    So, who gains if the whole country switches over to Fibre? It ain't Jo Blow that's fer sure but Jo Blow will pay and play the game with the same logic as a National voter, they told us it would be "Better"

    Peria • Since Dec 2006 • 5521 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes,

    But Wait... There's More...

    As ProPublica, The New York Times, and The Guardian reported last week, documents provided by Edward Snowden suggest that the NSA has heavily influenced the standard, which has been used around the world. In its statement Tuesday, the NIST acknowledged that the NSA participates in creating cryptography standards "because of its recognized expertise" and because the NIST is required by law to consult with the spy agency. "We are not deliberately, knowingly, working to undermine or weaken encryption," NIST chief Patrick Gallagher said at a public conference Tuesday.

    Various versions of Microsoft Windows, including those used in tablets and smartphones, contain implementations of the standard, though the NSA-influenced portion isn't enabled by default. Developers creating applications for the platform must choose to enable it.

    So. I guess its wise to buy Huawei.
    ;-)

    Peria • Since Dec 2006 • 5521 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Steve Barnes,

    downloading

    Think about uploading. Better still, think about real-time hi-def video-conferencing that's as good as being across the table from someone you're dealing with.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19688 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic,

    Whoop-de-do. Wouldn't a bankrupt Chorus be cheaper to buy back by a Labour-led Govt?

    PM has questions about Chorus' future

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5420 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes, in reply to Sacha,

    Think about uploading. Better still, think about real-time hi-def video-conferencing that’s as good as being across the table from someone you’re dealing with.

    Don't think so. We all know Deals are done behind closed doors, why would you do it over a video link with all five eyes watching your every thrust and parry.
    I would agree that it would be nice to have deals done in the open but we would have to wait for a Labour Govt. for that to happen.

    Peria • Since Dec 2006 • 5521 posts Report Reply

  • Matthew Poole, in reply to Steve Barnes,

    I did , however, come up with a likely beneficiary, the GCSB.
    It is much easier to intercept a multiplexed data stream over fibre than to have to tap in to all those strands of copper.

    You do know that the trunks have been fibre for a decade or more, right? All those data streams have been multiplexed onto fibre at the exchange level since the late-90s/early-00s. Copper back-haul went the way of the dodo when ADSL started breaking the Mbps limit, because it's just too expensive to try and deliver even vaguely acceptable levels of service with copper back-haul.

    Your entire conspiracy delusion falls apart at that point.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2007 • 4097 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes, in reply to Matthew Poole,

    Your entire conspiracy delusion falls apart at that point.

    Unless...
    ComputerWorld April 2003
    Tapping fiber optic cable without being detected,

    ....and making
    sense of the information you collect, certainly isn't trivial, but
    has been done for the past seven or eight years
    Gartner Group

    It makes sense then that local interception would be capable of being hidden more easily than international traffic,
    UK’s GCHQ Reportedly Intercepting Data By Tapping Fiber Optic Cables By Adnan Farooqui on 06/23/2013:

    the Government Communications Headquarters or GCHQ, is allegedly intercepting large quantities of web and telephone call data by tapping fiber optic cables directly which carry internet and telephony traffic. The program is called Tempora and is based on two components called Mastering The Internet and Global Telecoms Exploitation.:

    One day conspiracy theories might well be known as history.
    Depends who wins, eh?.

    Peria • Since Dec 2006 • 5521 posts Report Reply

  • Matthew Poole, in reply to Steve Barnes,

    None of that changes the reality that UFB is a useless place to do fibre tapping because it's still a strand per connection, and back-haul from exchanges and cabinets has been multiplexed over fibre for longer than the FTTH discussion has been happening seriously in this country.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2007 • 4097 posts Report Reply

  • Matthew Poole,

    The plot thickens, with confirmation that Joyce "persuaded would-be participants in a campaign fighting for lower internet prices not to take part."
    Various big-name organisations withdrew support after speaking with Joyce, which "[he] takes that to mean the campaign tends to fall apart whenever the other view has a chance to be represented."

    hmm, no, I don't think that's likely.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2007 • 4097 posts Report Reply

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