Posts by Joe Wylie

  • Hard News: We're in this together, in reply to Tom Semmens,

    Our radio are so much more independent these days, they don’t need the PM to write their copy for them.

    Khrist that shirt's vile.
    About Savage's supposedly draconian control of the media, maybe a little context would help.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 3629 posts Report Reply

  • Busytown: Tell You What: A Nonfiction Giveaway!, in reply to hamishm,

    My favourite non-fiction read this year was “Return of a King” by William Dalrymple.

    It’s a phenomenal book. One thing that surprised me was Dalrymple’s apparently reactionary take on the Scottish independence referendum. He appeared to assume that the class privilege he’d enjoyed applied to all Scots, while ignoring the colonial heavy lifting carried out on Britain’s behalf by generations of his less fortunate countrymen.

    As much of this is depicted in his remarkable works on South Asian history, it’s all the more surprising that his outsider’s objectivity seems to fail when his subject is closer to home.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 3629 posts Report Reply

  • Hard News: Word of the Year 2014: #dirtypolitics, in reply to Ian Dalziel,

    he really did like PA’s sandpit, for whatever reasons, he obviously misses it.
    But what is it about ‘doesn’t play well with others’ that those ‘players’ can’t understand?
    Hell is other people, eh…

    Perhaps he still misses the DimPost, where his stultifyingly stolid antics once clogged the place like a rampant quagga mussel infestation. While it doesn't take a qualified professional to spot that something's amiss in the cognitive department, he's now village idiot in absentia at disability-friendly PAS.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 3629 posts Report Reply

  • Access: Some aspects of New Zealand's…, in reply to Hilary Stace,

    At Kimberley and other places, as Robert Martin reports in his book, Becoming a person, there were also some good people with the best of intentions. Some were in official roles and some were just kind staff. But the systems were set up to oppress them all.

    I’m sure that similar claims were made about institutions such as the old Templeton at the time Kimberley was established. The burden of placing those with behavioural issues into the community falls disproportionately on those with lower incomes, and we continue to jail people with real disabilities while stigmatising them as ‘dumb crims’. No revolution has occurred to fully banish oppression, the need for reform is ongoing.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 3629 posts Report Reply

  • Access: Some aspects of New Zealand's…, in reply to Hilary Stace,

    The Donald Beasley Institute in Dunedin evaluated the whole process from the perspectives of staff, families and residents and the reports are on their website if anyone cares to read them.

    Thanks Hilary, I'm still working my way through the material. While it relates to a later period than what affected me - my dad retired from Kimberley in the late 1970s - the thoroughness is pretty impressive. I must say I'm dismayed to discover that a significant proportion of effectively untrained people were working at Kimberley at the time of its closure.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 3629 posts Report Reply

  • Hard News: Word of the Year 2014: #dirtypolitics, in reply to Ian Dalziel,

    You do realise the NZ Police and security forces (and their masters) have absolutely no sense of humour…

    Yep. The sequence outside the courtroom in Operation 8: Into the Forest, where a member of the police prosecution team insists that the freshly exonerated ‘terrorists’ are still guilty as hell of 'something' as far as he’s concerned, is deeply creepy.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 3629 posts Report Reply

  • Access: Some aspects of New Zealand's…, in reply to Hilary Stace,

    Yes, I was too young back then to be aware of that stuff. Another thing I wonder about was how much formal support was in place for those who'd been 'released' into the wider world. I recall adults discussing stuff like how they'd called on someone on Christmas day and found him eating baked beans, with the suggestion that it was more down to ignorance than deprivation. What I don't know is whether that kind of follow-up was over to the initiative of individuals, or part of an organised outreach.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 3629 posts Report Reply

  • Access: Some aspects of New Zealand's…, in reply to Rosemary McDonald,

    Highway 57 turns very sharply to the right on the final appraoch into Levin. Arapaepae Road becomes Kimberly Road at this bend.

    Arapaepae carries on beyond Kimberley in my recollection, but I understand your direction now, thanks :)

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 3629 posts Report Reply

  • Access: Some aspects of New Zealand's…, in reply to Hilary Stace,

    Thanks Hilary, really appreciate the update. For good or ill that place shaped me.

    About work conditions for the disabled - with the kind of import restrictions in place in the 50s and 60s Levin was then a booming small manufacturing centre, which promised a good fit with the impetus back then to make useful citizens of the disabled. My mother encouraged my brother and me to drop in on two of her favourites, who she'd known as boys from her time nursing at Templeton.

    They lived in a very basic staff house at Ashley wallpapers, and having visitors was probably meant to encourage their attempts at domesticity. While I have no idea how fairly they were treated in their employment they seemed to manage well enough. The only issue for me was their insistence on our listening to both sides of their one and only LP, which featured "Holland's most famous barrel organ".

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 3629 posts Report Reply

  • Access: Some aspects of New Zealand's…, in reply to Rosemary McDonald,

    And a few weeks ago we took the back route from Palmerston North through to Levin. I had to slow down to nearly stationery for the sharp bend at the end….and asked Peter what on earth was lurking behind that hedge….hidden, unkempt, gloomy…."That’s Kimberly….”

    Enough said.

    While I can understand your feelings, I'm not connecting with your geography. The chunk of the old State Farm once occupied by the dreaded Kimberley stretches for close to a kilometer along a dead straight stretch of Kimberley Road, but there are no bends, sharp or otherwise, on or anywhere close to Kimberley proper.

    These places, should they be bulldozed, erased?

    Six years ago what was left of Kimberley appeared to be securely mothballed, with a pair of bored guards who were keen to talk at the main entrance, but strictly no admittance. When I last visited there in December 2012 they were gone. An access road had been bulldozed past the old main entrance leading to some kind of market gardening activity.

    There was a big heap of Roundup containers in the field next to the recently demolished staff house where I spent my first 17 years. Even the pohutukawa my mother planted the year I was born appeared to have been blown over. I didn't want to venture too far in, as the few weatherboard buildings still standing were in bad shape. Like Shelly Bay the place was once an Air Force facility, and the peeling weatherboard atmosphere was very similar.

    I'd imagine that the later structures are in better nick, but the sheer room for expansion that the place offered only seemed to encourage empire building.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 3629 posts Report Reply

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