Posts by TracyMac

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  • Legal Beagle: Dotcom spying: Crown…, in reply to Kyle Matthews,

    I don't know about the linked blog as a whole, but it quotes the an article by Meurant about his change of heart about some areas of his life, including police culture and actions. http://www.police-corruption.com/nz-warned-regarding-anti-terror-legislation/

    In short, people can reflect, and change their views.

    Canberra, West Island • Since Nov 2006 • 504 posts Report Reply

  • Legal Beagle: Kim Dotcom vs. The Teapot Tapes, in reply to martinb,

    While he's a fun piece of ginger up the backside of certain politicians right now, I wouldn't want him actually running the country. Winnie and Hide in unholy synergy....

    Canberra, West Island • Since Nov 2006 • 504 posts Report Reply

  • Hard News: Media3: Where harm might fall, in reply to Lilith __,

    I think Anil Dash expressed the best perspective on the uses of site moderation: If your website's full of assholes, it's your fault

    Canberra, West Island • Since Nov 2006 • 504 posts Report Reply

  • Hard News: Living with the psychopath,

    Yes, can we please not blanketly discuss these offenders and the treatment programmes in exclusively black and white terms?

    I was a victim of sexual abuse as a child. I have had a young family member recently complete a programme as an offender. Let me tell you, finding out about his offending rang a lot of bells for me.

    However, for him, receiving that treatment was the best thing for him. His offense was not anywhere near Murray's league; he is young enough and the signs are very encouraging that it will work.

    I strongly believe that lumping my young family member into the same regime Murray should be subjected to - preventative detention, if it were available - or the arsehole who abused me (prison, I wish) would be incredibly counter-productive. Where possible, rehabilitation/treatment should be the primary objective.

    Perhaps even more so in abuse cases, because of that trail of damage they leave behind. Universal witch hunts would not be conducive to the aim of catching them young and treatable.

    Canberra, West Island • Since Nov 2006 • 504 posts Report Reply

  • Up Front: The Up-Front Guides: The…,

    Not exactly, it isn't. Celebrants and ministers can take the marriage vows and declarations that comprise a legal ceremony.Sure, it still needs to be registered, but a registrar is not required to hear the declaration (witness the oath, so to speak) if an approved celebrant has.

    In Germany, and possibly other European countries, a celebrant's role is purely ceremonial. And has no legal relevance.

    Canberra, West Island • Since Nov 2006 • 504 posts Report Reply

  • Up Front: The Up-Front Guides: The…, in reply to Angus Robertson,

    Other than what Chris has been explaining, my other point is mainly about the angst that certain religious types have about the "sanctity of marriage". If it were reinforced that marriage is now a civil ceremony despite its roots (and those roots are in fact part of what I find distasteful about it), then perhaps all that bleating would stop.

    Churches are still entitled to be as bigoted as they please in our laws (although perhaps not going to US extremes, as shown this week), so you can have your ceremony as "sanctified" as you like. But not legal until acknowledged in the approved civil manner.

    Canberra, West Island • Since Nov 2006 • 504 posts Report Reply

  • Up Front: The Up-Front Guides: The…,

    To solve some quandaries about religion vis a vis marriage, there is a simple solution: go the German model, and make legal marriage the sole purview of the civil authorities. Sure, do what you want to in your church, if you must, but it's not legal until you make your declaration to the registrar and sign the piece of paper.

    As for Steve's fulminations earlier, I'm also personally against the idea of marriage as a legal concept privileging certain relationship configurations. Particularly in countries like the US where you're even taxed differently. Not to mention its historical purpose (ensuring legitimacy and inheritance for the propertied classes).

    However, we're stuck with it, so the fact that we (queers) remain second-class citizens in this respect makes it worthy to fight for.

    Canberra, West Island • Since Nov 2006 • 504 posts Report Reply

  • Legal Beagle: On the possibilities of a…, in reply to Keir Leslie,

    Ahah, thanks for clarifying the double jeopardy being the same (and Graeme). Interesting it still hangs on.

    Canberra, West Island • Since Nov 2006 • 504 posts Report Reply

  • Legal Beagle: On the possibilities of a…, in reply to David Ritchie,

    This is the kind of situation, and even more so in the Ewan Macdonald case, where the Scottish verdict of "not proven" is appealing, when the preponderance of motive and evidence goes one way,but not beyond "reasonable doubt".

    I understand that verdict is given in very much a minority of cases, and has the effect of getting around potential double-jeopardy problems. You'd want it to be relatively rare to avoid back doors being continually left for the convenience of police/prosecutors.

    Canberra, West Island • Since Nov 2006 • 504 posts Report Reply

  • Busytown: “Glory! Glory! There’s the salt!”,

    Beautiful tribute.

    And yes, the oddities and diversity and mixture of characters in her writing always felt welcoming. Even with the uneasiness of the plots.

    The Changeover is still my favourite - bought the original edition last year (yay Abebooks). I also like Maddigan's Fantasia, book and show (and many others, of course).

    On another note, libraries were lifesavers to me growing up, and she has been so thoroughly associated with them. I'll be thinking of her when I do my next book run.

    Canberra, West Island • Since Nov 2006 • 504 posts Report Reply

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