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Access: The Driverless Road Ahead

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  • Russell Brown,

    Thanks KR. This is fascinating – and helpful to me. I do a lot of thinking about my sons, education and work.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22584 posts Report Reply

  • Hilary Stace,

    I really hope that Specialisterne sets up in NZ. I've been a fan of the idea since hearing Thorkil Sonne speak about it many years ago. It wouldn't suit my family, but could provide real employment opportunities for many.

    Wgtn • Since Jun 2008 • 3153 posts Report Reply

  • Lisa Black,

    That was a good read. Thanks.

    Wellington • Since Jul 2010 • 71 posts Report Reply

  • Hans Versluys,

    Thanks for the interesting read. It also brings home the urgent need for UBI to allow everybody to figure out at their own pace what they want out of life, without the massive stress of "sink-or-swim" bearing down on you.

    Auckland • Since Jul 2011 • 32 posts Report Reply

  • Prudence,

    What a fantastic read. Thank you.
    If I had a million dollars or more, I'd build a huge workshop where people could build things and repair things, fitted out with awesome woodworking, metal working, and automotive machinery. Community owned and managed, with paid tutors for those who need them.
    What a wonderful thing that would be for those of us now on the scrap heap.

    New Zealand • Since Jun 2016 • 15 posts Report Reply

  • Hilary Stace, in reply to Prudence,

    Jacinda Ardern says that metalwork was one of her favourite subjects at school. Perhaps she could incorporate your idea into her agenda. It would fit into their policies for education, night classes, employment and mental health.
    But we need a network of such workshops around NZ, not just one.

    Wgtn • Since Jun 2008 • 3153 posts Report Reply

  • Moz, in reply to Prudence,

    I'd build a huge workshop where people could...

    There are "maker spaces" around Aotearoa, as well as other community workshops. If you're a man there's the men's shed movement, there are often similar things that are more inclusive if you search. Search is cheap now we have the internet, what people often need is the keywords to use :) Also, local councils are often good at having a list of things like that, it can be worth looking at their website(s), and as part of that libraries are starting to provide those resources (since apparently polytechs can't do that any more. Polytech used to be great, you'd pay $50 for six months of weekly evening classes in a workshop where you could generally work on your own vaguely-related project under expert supervision).

    https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=makerspace
    https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=mens+shed

    It can also be worth broadening out to things like bicycle co-ops because community groups that incidentally do workshop-related things will often welcome someone who "just" wants to make their workshop better in exchange for using it. I have refitted a bowling club workshop on that basis once, they had a "shed" (I'm being charitable) that I did up and turned into a grounds-shed and workshop using their money and mostly my labour (the bowlers helped at times). I'm pretty sure both sides were happy with the arrangement (I definitely was). For a few months I had a much better workshop, but then ... I was renting, I had to move, suddenly it wasn't over the back fence any more. Bah!

    Sydney, West Island • Since Nov 2006 • 1120 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic, in reply to Moz,

    Polytech used to be great, you'd pay $50 for six months of weekly evening classes in a workshop where you could generally work on your own vaguely-related project under expert supervision).

    The kind of polytech that helped produce the Poly-1? The Wikipedia entry for it is courtesy of yours truly. All it's missing now is an image, fair use permitting. It'd be interesting to revive it as a desktop or "luggable" PC chassis.

    Hilary:

    I really hope that Specialisterne sets up in NZ. I've been a fan of the idea since hearing Thorkil Sonne speak about it many years ago. It wouldn't suit my family, but could provide real employment opportunities for many.

    So far they've held surveys, and they're getting back to us in a matter of weeks.

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5397 posts Report Reply

  • Moz, in reply to Kumara Republic,

    The kind of polytech that helped produce the Poly-1?

    I may have used one of those, as part of a Scout Jamboree somewhere, but beige plastic thing with handles, all smooth-ish plastic and I can't remember any of the details. It seemed less hackable than the C64 I had somehow managed to acquire ($1000 was a lot of money back then).

    At that time the hacker community was ham radio based for the most part (unless you wanted to do TV with the Christians). I got some valuable help from local radio people and ended up with a "tweaked" C64, before the C128 came out with similar mods.

    Sydney, West Island • Since Nov 2006 • 1120 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic, in reply to Moz,

    It seemed less hackable than the C64 I had somehow managed to acquire ($1000 was a lot of money back then).

    At that time the hacker community was ham radio based for the most part (unless you wanted to do TV with the Christians). I got some valuable help from local radio people and ended up with a "tweaked" C64, before the C128 came out with similar mods.

    Speaking of the C64, it's what got me started on the whole computer thing to begin with. There's often one person you've never met who still had a major impact on your life, and for me that person was Jack Tramiel, the founder of Commodore Business Machines.

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5397 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic,

    One other aspect I didn't mention in my original post: when bailouts are inevitable, there's a visible difference in approach between the Anglo-Saxon model and the Nordic model. Long story short, Anglo-Saxon economies tend to bail out distressed corporations with no guarantee of ROI - think British Leyland, GM, and much of Wall St and the City of London. Whereas Nordic economies have tended to bail out distressed workers instead, as happened with Sweden's shipbuilding sector, and more recently the Saab Cars bankruptcy.

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5397 posts Report Reply

  • Katharine Moody, in reply to Moz,

    I may have used one of those, as part of a Scout Jamboree somewhere, but beige plastic thing with handles, all smooth-ish plastic and I can't remember any of the details.

    I was employed by Polycorp (a subsidiary of Progeni) to sell them. Yep, big beige plastic cover (screen, board, keyboard combined in the one package) - with handles. Way ahead of its time - first in the world, I believe, to have a 'broadcast' (limited network/connectivity) function - such that the teacher could load the classroom of PCs from a 'master'. First in the world too, I think for multiple, programmable graphics screens. What a world beating tech / education industry NZ would have had the Muldoon government of the day prescribed Poly as the classroom standard.

    Wellington • Since Sep 2014 • 797 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford, in reply to Katharine Moody,

    Another world leader was Crown Lynn. They could have been makeing small things out of silicon by now.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 4036 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie, in reply to steven crawford,

    They could have been makeing small things out of silicon by now.

    Like, teeny-weeny versions of these?

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4586 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford, in reply to Joe Wylie,

    Yes, they could have been making Ceramic resonatators. But that wasn't to be.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 4036 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic,

    The Economist finally acknowledges that elephant-curve globalisation has fomented Brexitrump-ist nativist-protectionist populism. As for solutions, it still seems hamstrung by a classical liberal world-view. In any case it seems the best way forward is to rescue distressed workers (offering financial aid to adapt & retool) rather than distressed companies (bailouts with no guarantee of long-term ROI).

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5397 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic,

    In light of Stephen Hawking's passing, here's a response by him from a Reddit AMA session from 2 years ago:

    I'm rather late to the question-asking party, but I'll ask anyway and hope. Have you thought about the possibility of technological unemployment, where we develop automated processes that ultimately cause large unemployment by performing jobs faster and/or cheaper than people can perform them? Some compare this thought to the thoughts of the Luddites, whose revolt was caused in part by perceived technological unemployment over 100 years ago. In particular, do you foresee a world where people work less because so much work is automated? Do you think people will always either find work or manufacture more work to be done? Thank you for your time and your contributions. I’ve found research to be a largely social endeavor, and you've been an inspiration to so many.

    Answer:

    If machines produce everything we need, the outcome will depend on how things are distributed. Everyone can enjoy a life of luxurious leisure if the machine-produced wealth is shared, or most people can end up miserably poor if the machine-owners successfully lobby against wealth redistribution. So far, the trend seems to be toward the second option, with technology driving ever-increasing inequality.

    Hawking later followed it up with a full-length commentary on how inequality and technology relate to the new wave of neo-nationalist demagoguery:

    * Stephen Hawking - This is the most dangerous time for our planet

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5397 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    Attachment

    The working class robots aren’t the problem. It’s the machine that’s steering us in the face, that gives me the shits. Once upon a time, science fiction frightened us with yarns about computers getting smarted than us. Weirdly, computers are now capable of making us stupid instead. LOL

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 4036 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    An autonomous car has killed a human. The human Women wasn’t crossing the road at the proper pedestrian vector.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 4036 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    Stephen Hawking's last paper

    The intriguing idea in Hawking’s paper is that [the multiverse] left its imprint on the background radiation permeating our universe and we could measure it with a detector on a spaceship.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 4036 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 4036 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 4036 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    “Cognitive liberation” is what the behavioural engineer said.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 4036 posts Report Reply

  • John Farrell, in reply to steven crawford,

    Ah, LSD....

    Dunedin • Since Nov 2006 • 470 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford, in reply to John Farrell,

    Just click on the tiny tab


    ¿

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 4036 posts Report Reply

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