Field Theory by Hadyn Green

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Field Theory: A post about art (sort of)

503 Responses

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  • Just thinking,

    Academic Institutions do get it wrong:

    Anyone remember recovered memory syndrome?
    Homosexuality as a mental illness?
    The whole Eugenics movement?
    Chicargo School of Economics?
    Any MBA (mediocre but arrogant)?

    There is a cosy place in hell for those with PhDs who put Doctor on their Koru Club Cards. The purpose of this is to identify MDs for emergencies.

    Putaringamotu • Since Apr 2009 • 1158 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    Quick! Is there a doctor of English on this plane? This man's participles are dangling!

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7473 posts Report Reply

  • merc,

    Gio wrote; We gave them a better world. Their humble craftsmen can now be fully-fledged artists.

    /gasps sees nub/

    Since Dec 2006 • 2471 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie,

    There is a cosy place in hell for those with PhDs who put Doctor on their Koru Club Cards. The purpose of this is to identify MDs for emergencies.

    More rampant anti-intellectualism. It may well be that the relentless drone of a fully-qualified monument to intellectual vanity can dislodge the most stubborn blood clots associated with deep vein thrombosis.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4591 posts Report Reply

  • recordari,

    It is better to die knowing you are a fool than to live thinking you are a genius.

    Confucius probably said.

    AUCKLAND • Since Dec 2009 • 2607 posts Report Reply

  • Keir Leslie,

    There is a cosy place in hell for those with PhDs who put Doctor on their Koru Club Cards. The purpose of this is to identify MDs for emergencies.

    Er, really? because in Germany (& quite a few other countries) it's a convention to call yourself Dr X in pretty much every situation. If ANZ uses Dr. X to spot medical doctors that's a bad idea.

    (& surgeons are always Mr or Miss/Ms/Mrs; so in fact many medical doctors won't call themselves Dr X.)

    Since Jul 2008 • 1452 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    Er, really? because in Germany (...) it's a convention to call yourself Dr X in pretty much every situation.

    Germany has the highest ratio of James Bond villains per head of population than any other country, yes.

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7473 posts Report Reply

  • Just thinking,

    Common amongst Academics I respect is to use their name and PhD afterward if relevant.

    In Europe the phone book has everyones profession in it, as a title. Academia became a refuge for many defunct aristorcrats.

    Putaringamotu • Since Apr 2009 • 1158 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    It's interesting that Mr/Ms/Dr divide among medical people: a highly-skilled & senior opthamalgic surgeon of my aquaintance prefers 'Doctor' ("It reassures older people.") A family member who is a senior GP uses "medical Doctor" for overseas flights - just because ANZ -as Just thinking posted- wants to know those people on their passenger lists.

    And the one other person in my family with a Ph.D *never* uses it when travelling overseas until happily settled in academic circles.
    But I'd settle for Joe Wylie's take - who knows what a fully-loaded Ph.D could do on behalf of of innocent thrombosi?

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    In Europe the phone book has everyones profession in it, as a title

    I beg your pardon?

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7473 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    Ur, Just thinking - which parts of Europe?
    I never noticed it in Scandavian countries, the Netherlands, nor the British Isles? (those, I am sorry to admit, are the only parts of Europe I have travelled to-)

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • 3410,

    It is better to die knowing you are a fool than to live thinking you are a genius.

    Confucius probably said.

    I imagine I'll do both.

    Auckland • Since Jan 2007 • 2618 posts Report Reply

  • Paul Litterick,

    Academia became a refuge for many defunct aristorcrats.

    But they told us that academia was a vast Jewish conspiracy. Anyway, how can one be a defunct aristocrat? It is not as if aristocrats stopped working - they never started.

    This is my 1000th post to PAS.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1000 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    Congratulations Paul Litterick!

    I really dont agree with you in so many areas - but I do appreciate your stance, posts, staunchness in matters that I think truly unreal-according-to-general human understanding- as evidence of a scholar
    who is determined. One way or the other.

    You do well.

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Just thinking,

    Poland uses them and I believe a number of other Central European countries.

    Paul, once Aristocrats had to start to work to live, they rallied to Universities by virtue of their education and became the gate keepers.

    Being Jewish and an Aristocrat are not mutually exclusive.

    Putaringamotu • Since Apr 2009 • 1158 posts Report Reply

  • chris,

    It is nothing personal, Chris, but you do not have the faintest idea what you are talking about, as that Wikipedia piece you posted shows.

    I don't know I just thought;

    1. "Spirit Resonance," or vitality, and seems to translate to the nervous energy transmitted from the artist into the work. The overall energy of a work of art. Xie He said that without Spirit Resonance, there was no need to look further.

    overlaps somewhat with the modern vocabulary for aesthetic appraisal of paintings as art.

    http://www.allembassies.com/china/img/ma_lin_chinese_painting_big.jpg

    Listening to the Pines, ink on silk, 13th Century, Ma Lin.

    Why isn't it art Paul? How how was the the artist's concept of art different from a post renaissance western artist?

    Mawkland • Since Jan 2010 • 1302 posts Report Reply

  • Martin Lindberg,

    In Europe the phone book has everyones profession in it, as a title

    Ah yes, that European phone book. I remember it well. It came in 87 leatherbound volumes for each household.

    Stockholm • Since Jul 2009 • 802 posts Report Reply

  • Rich Lock,

    Did the Herald's sideswipe have anything to say about those households that didn't want it?

    back in the mother countr… • Since Feb 2007 • 2728 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson,

    This is my 1000th post to PAS.

    So that's what the party is about?

    I think I cracked 2000 posts before ever meeting a PASer ITF. I would not recommend this.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10629 posts Report Reply

  • Sam F,

    Possibly related: the mysterious multiplication of Duchamp readymades.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1609 posts Report Reply

  • recordari,

    Following on from discussions above (yes, I'm going back there) it started to dawn on me that this has many parallels to the world of language where colonisation and western style democratisation has overrun many orally based or indigenous languages, including, obviously, Maori.

    In this article the author summarises this problem thus;

    Phillipson documents the process of linguistic imperialism, in which the teaching of literate forms of colonial and national languages does enormous damage to most of the ancestral and primarily oral languages of the world, as well as to their cultures (Phillipson, 1992). Mühlhäusler traces the destruction of language ecologies – not just languages but the conditions that make these languages viable – by what he calls ‘killer languages’ (Mühlhäusler, 1996).

    Isn't saying the west invented art similar to saying it invented language, and that what existed before was a lessor, primitive form of communication (read art), that needed the rigour of institutionalised academia to enlighten the primitive culture as to it's true meaning, form or value?

    How is this not the worst kind of cultural imperialism?

    The standpoint of Art History seems wholly insufficient to properly consider the nuances of these issues, even with regards to Art. Surely the broader aspects relate to Anthropology, Philosophy, Linguistics, Sociology yadda yadda yadda.

    We gave them a better world. Their humble craftsmen can now be fully-fledged artists.

    As merc said, this seems to be the nub of it.
    Your culture, art, language, heritage has no meaning or value unless, or until, we say it does. I have nothing to learn from you, so shut up and listen.

    Doesn't make me a proud Pakeha, to be honest. Especially as one who taught English for many years. In my defence I wasn't part of an invading colonial force. Well, not overtly.

    AUCKLAND • Since Dec 2009 • 2607 posts Report Reply

  • chris,

    The standpoint of Art History seems wholly insufficient to properly consider the nuances of these issues, even with regards to Art. Surely the broader aspects relate to Anthropology, Philosophy, Linguistics, Sociology yadda yadda yadda.

    I agree Recordari, This from Stanford's Art history dept.

    Art History is a historical discipline that seeks to reintegrate the work of art into the original context of its making and reception, foregrounding its significant status as both historical document and act of social communication. At the same time, Art History seeks to understand the ways in which the work of art transcends the historical moment of its production, taking on a range of different meanings in later historical periods, including our own. As part of their visual training, students of Art History become proficient in cultural analysis and historical interpretation. Art History thus envisions itself as uniquely well positioned to train students from a variety of disciplines in the light of the dramatic visual turn that has gripped the humanities and the sciences over the course of the last decade, with more and more disciplines becoming vitally interested in visual forms and modes of communication.

    Not so much an end in itself.

    Mawkland • Since Jan 2010 • 1302 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    It would be a mistake in the other direction to see indigenous cultures as victims. I prefer a more hegemonic way of looking at cultural interactions over time. But that does require both parties to recognise the similarities and the points of difference.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19667 posts Report Reply

  • recordari,

    I understand what you're saying. However, it seems important to acknowledge when indigenous cultures were in fact victims, and move forward from there. Interestingly when I typed Imperialist Apologist into google, this quote from Mark twain came up.

    Having now laid all the historical facts before the Person Sitting in Darkness, we should bring him to again, and explain them to him. We should say to him: They look doubtful, but in reality they are not. There have been lies; yes, but they were told in a good cause. We have been treacherous; but that was only in order that real good might come out of apparent evil. True, we have crushed a deceived and confiding people; we have turned against the weak and the friendless who trusted us. We have stamped out a just and intelligent and well-ordered republic; we have stabbed an ally in the back and slapped the face of a guest; we have bought a Shadow from an enemy that hadn't it to sell; we have robbed a trusting friend of his land and his liberty; we have invited our clean young men to shoulder a discredited musket and do bandit's work … but each detail was for the best. We know this. The Head of every State and Sovereignty in Christendom, including our Congress and our fifty State Legislatures, are members not only of the church, but also of the Blessings-of-Civilization Trust. This world-girdling accumulation of trained morals, high principles, and justice, cannot do an unright thing, an unfair thing, an ungenerous thing, an unclean thing. It knows what it is about. Give yourself no uneasiness; it is all right.

    Read more:

    Hmm, I'm not so sure.

    AUCKLAND • Since Dec 2009 • 2607 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    it seems important to acknowledge when indigenous cultures were in fact victims

    Agreed. And the lasting damage it does to their victimisers.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19667 posts Report Reply

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