Island Life by David Slack

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Island Life: Vendor says sell!

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  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    We made the decision, to live in a modestly improved 1930s farm pump shed. It might be a bit tricky to sell for big numbers. But thats hardly the point of home ownership, at our house.

    Sounds like an interesting house you have there Steven. We have friends in hand built pole houses and 1/2 round barn conversions(with views to die for to boot) and they wouldn't consider any number big enough to sell. We had an idea once to sell but the more your house becomes your home, the more difficult it is to go.When I realized that the hard slog my other 1/2 put into this place was not just a reno,it was from his heart, it then became a bigger part of us. Neither of us plan to go anywhere in any hurry. We know we would make money to sell but what for? To walk away to do it somewhere else? To change town? To do it again?To buy up? I considered that seriously and couldn't find a health benefit so couldn't see the point. Home sweet home.:)

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    Look - I don't take Colin to be suggesting that we respond to uncertain times in an ignorant or simplistic way,

    Nothing wrong with simple if it floats your boat. It does feel like the media just lurve a good nasty though and agree that any contract should be binding so, sensibility could be the order of the day huh?

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    Or maybe I meant sensibly? I don't know. I'm all confused now . Moving right along....on the page,that is ;)

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Yamis,

    Also, I read in the DomPost today that banks won't lend to single people without a big deposit. Is this legal - marital status is a prohibited ground of discrimination, isn't it?

    You mean like how insurance companies make males under 25 pay more for car insurance even if they've never caused an accident?

    Now how those fuckers get away with that is beyond me. My one and only accident behind the wheel was caused by a female who lost control on a corner in the wet and slammed me off the road. Lucky for her because I was probably subsidising her insurance.

    I can understand why it costs more to get health insurance if you were a smoker or had had heart by-pass surgery 3 times in the last couple of days and were about to run the New York marathon to raise money for your upcoming brain surgery. But how can you be discriminated against based on nothing you've ever done (and I don't want to get into discussions about the drinking age, driving age etc).

    It should be a level playing field at the start and then we can start the earthworks AFTER the ref has blown his whistle and sent a few to the sinbin.

    rant out.

    Since Nov 2006 • 903 posts Report Reply

  • Rich Lock,

    We have friends in hand built pole houses and 1/2 round barn conversions(with views to die for to boot) and they wouldn't consider any number big enough to sell. We had an idea once to sell but the more your house becomes your home, the more difficult it is to go.When I realized that the hard slog my other 1/2 put into this place was not just a reno,it was from his heart, it then became a bigger part of us. Neither of us plan to go anywhere in any hurry. We know we would make money to sell but what for? To walk away to do it somewhere else? To change town? To do it again?To buy up? I considered that seriously and couldn't find a health benefit so couldn't see the point. Home sweet home.:)

    For me, that pretty much hits the nail on the head. Every time an advert/newspaper article/home renovation TV programme/colleague refers to the place you live as an 'investment', or 'looking after their biggest assest', or some other phrasing that doesn't include the word HOME, I feel my blood pressure steadily begin to climb towards the red zone.

    We bought our place because we wanted to LIVE IN IT. We locked in for five years because we wanted some certainty about exactly how much was going to disappear from the bank account every fortnight. As it happens, the decision to lock in for five years has been paying off for the last four years. And now that it isn't, I can't really muster the energy to give a stuff - a fixed cash amount went out last month and the month before that, a fixed cash amount will go out next month and the month after that. And we'll still be living in our HOME.

    back in the mother countr… • Since Feb 2007 • 2728 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    I found 5 survivability factors to be quite interesting if anyone wants an insight into finance companies

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Paul Campbell,

    moving back to NZ from the US 4 years ago we kind of did the opposite what most people are talking about here - we took out a higher interest loan with the express purpose of paying it off sooner with no penalties - our mortgage and our checking account are the same thing, when the numbers are negative we owe the bank and pay interest, positive and it's paid off. Sadly the NZ/US exchange rate did the nasty on us soon after we came home so we paid it off more slowly than we planned - but it still allowed us to get out from under that debt as quickly as we could.

    We still have the paid off mortgage tied to our checking account - it doesn't cost anything and there's those kitchen renovations coming up .... we have an instant home loan available on call ....

    Dunedin • Since Nov 2006 • 2606 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    we have an instant home loan available on call ....

    I have an instant builder/cabinet maker available on call :)

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    Sounds like an interesting house you have there Steven.

    If I was a real-estate agent, I would describe it more like this:"With a bit of imagination, this house could be more than a fibrolight clad box". I painted the living/bedroom floor burgundy red, after I bogged all the borer damage. We blew all out renovation budget on a brand spanking new Wood-stove oven and wetback system. However I have just acquired a large quantity of generously sized marble slab, dirt cheap. So things are about to get wacky round here.

    we took out a higher interest loan with the express purpose of paying it off sooner with no penalties

    Thats been out philosophy, and it paid off.

    Sadly the NZ/US exchange rate did the nasty on us...

    Now that is a real piss off. I'm interesting in manufacturing. Look at what's happening to our dollar

    The local scrappy tells my the metal prices are back on the way up. NOW's probably the time to start buying big bits of copper and bronze, to augment the gardens ambience, rather than crappy fountains and pottery from the importers. Your garden art could double or treble as it gradually turns green, from oxidation.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4316 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    If I was a real-estate agent, I would describe it more like this:"With a bit of imagination, this house could be more than a fibrolight clad box".

    :)lol

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Jeremy Crowley,

    I don't think that I could ever be that person.... The one that forsakes every creature comfort to pay off the mortgage by sometime next year. If I don't have at least a six pack in the fridge and at least one cafe' supplied espresso a week . I start to get all jittery. ( And no-one can convince me that home brew is a suitable alternative to decent store bought).
    I also suppose that by admitting my lack of financial fortitude I should now stop questioning some peoples right to a community services card. Even if I did see the car that they turned up in, and I did overhear their address when paying for their child's swimming lessons.........Am I just becoming a begrudging old sourpuss?

    Otautahi • Since Nov 2008 • 24 posts Report Reply

  • Kyle Matthews,

    And no-one can convince me that home brew is a suitable alternative to decent store bought

    Certainly that's the case for my homebrew. Some of the last batch of cider I did I tossed it was approaching undrinkable. I'll try again in a month when the apple tree throws about 20 buckets of apples at me, if that doesn't work I'll try beer.

    But I have a friend who has a whole shed full of alcohol, including what apparently isn't a half-bad whiskey, given it's only a couple of years old. (I don't like whiskey, but local experts have assessed it _thoroughly_)

    And he can turn just about anything into a reasonable wine.

    Since Nov 2006 • 6243 posts Report Reply

  • Jeremy Crowley,

    And he can turn just about anything into a reasonable wine.

    I suppose I should have been more specific. I am referring to the generic penny pinching beer brewing kits.
    Homemade wine/cider/mead however is a different story.

    Otautahi • Since Nov 2008 • 24 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    Am I just becoming a begrudging old sourpuss?

    Hard to say. How old are you?

    I can report on the beer front that a friend's homebrew far surpasses the standard supermarket fare of Speight's and Steilnlager and Export Gold and so on cloning. I don't have time to tackle that particular project but when our latest child is a bit older I'm going to try to get him (the friend, not the child) to teach me.

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7473 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    I've got a crate of empties. Thats a start I suppose. I'm going to go ginger beer for now. easy enough to throw a bit of ethanol in it later, when they start selling it at the pump.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4316 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    community services card.

    Jeremy, to not know the full story probably puts you in the sourpuss department. No matter what the car or address, these people could be high end users of medications for various reasons and thus entitled to the card. But yes, we tend to like quality beer in the fridge also, and yes I think alot of us around PAS are pretty lucky so don't begrudge anyone really.

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Jeremy Andrew,

    Never heard about buying low? The market is due to rebound any minute now. You know, like in Japan.

    Dead cat bounce?

    Hamiltron - City of the F… • Since Nov 2006 • 900 posts Report Reply

  • Jeremy Crowley,

    to not know the full story probably puts you in the sourpuss department.

    Yeah, I figured as much. It's just that my initial feelings of jealousy led me to feel progressively grumpier on my way home. It was a potential six packs worth of savings however!

    Otautahi • Since Nov 2008 • 24 posts Report Reply

  • Blake Monkley,

    Dead cat bounce?

    Mining stocks look attractive here in Australia. I cannot see a sustained recovery unless there is a corresponding upturn in demand; they still have to negotiate new iron ore prices with China, which could see them go lower.

    Loving the cricket...

    Auckland • Since Jul 2008 • 215 posts Report Reply

  • Lx,

    Meanwhile back in England banks are now requiring a 50% deposit for new builds.

    Ouch.

    Wellington • Since Apr 2007 • 24 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    Another way to skin a cat, for 75K. And I would say, seriously negotiable during these time's of economic pessimism.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4316 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    But wait, this is real value for money. Te Aroha rumored to built out of slit kaori log. This is when logs are split so there planks are mirrored ether side of the hull.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4316 posts Report Reply

  • Lx,

    The Te Aroha could be a good investment. Well, no worse than any finance company punt anyways.

    With seating for 73 and a dance floor it's hard to go past her.

    Wellington • Since Apr 2007 • 24 posts Report Reply

  • stephen walker,

    slightly off topic, but only slightly:
    best ever article i've read about the origins of the "subprime crisis"

    The End by by Michael Lewis (author of 1989 book Liar's Poker )

    and i have read a lot of articles on this topic, before it was even heard of in the MSM. before if even happened, ffs!

    nagano • Since Nov 2006 • 645 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    "subprime crisis"

    That's now starting to look like a three wheeler bike.

    Right, I,m off hunting wild goats with my home made bow and arrow.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4316 posts Report Reply

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