Island Life by David Slack

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Island Life: Burning Down the House.

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  • Sacha,

    Amerkin, then?

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16272 posts Report Reply

  • Christopher Dempsey,

    Christopher, we honestly gave it careful thought

    I apologise if I suggested that you hadn't. You would be in the very very small minority of people that actually do give things thought.

    I suppose we should start to add a few extra metres in light of global climatic change; all that CO2 and plants go wild.

    Parnell / Tamaki-Auckland… • Since Sep 2008 • 639 posts Report Reply

  • recordari,

    I feel left out. My worst to date is a spatula on an element. Amazing how plastic ash can find it's way into closed cupboards in rooms at the other end of the house though.

    Oh, there was that bonfire incident, but I was just taking photos, so was more concerned about getting a good shot than the sea of flames rolling down the hill. Hot tip: don't use accelerant when bonfire on slope.

    AUCKLAND • Since Dec 2009 • 2607 posts Report Reply

  • Rich Lock,

    For the uninitiated, old-style primus camping stoves require a pre-heating step before frantic pumping of a small handle (hopefully) gets them going under their own steam. This pre-heating requires the use of a small amount of meths or similar, which is poured into a circular trough at the top of the stove. When it is ignited, it pre-heats the working parts.

    Anyway, this one time, at scout camp...someone decided the primus stove wasn't getting hot enough and that the initial pouring of the meths had been too parsimonious. Naturally, the obvious solution was to pour on a bit more.

    Remarkably, all that the resulting purple-blue fireball did was singe a few eyebrows, all involved living to tell the tale.

    back in the mother countr… • Since Feb 2007 • 2326 posts Report Reply

  • Emma Hart,

    Amerkin, then?

    I do not wish to foster any unkind stereotypes. But yes.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4327 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    Oh I recall previous mentions..

    Isn't it great when unpleasant working relationships become distant memories (please reassure me)?

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16272 posts Report Reply

  • recordari,

    Anyway, this one time, at scout camp...someone decided the primus stove wasn't getting hot enough and that the initial pouring of the meths had been too parsimonious. Naturally, the obvious solution was to pour on a bit more.

    And henceforth I heard the rest in the voice of Alyson Hannigan, which was no doubt your intention.

    Amerkin Pie?

    AUCKLAND • Since Dec 2009 • 2607 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    Those outtakes are great. So cute

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16272 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    Ok, so now I 'm checking on the spelling and it does appear to be "Alder", but, there are no Mexican ones. There is Italian, Alnus Cordata (12m) or , Glutinosa native to Europe, Asia or North Africa,(18-20m), Incana,also native of Europe and North America(15m) but no Mexicano. Still my information suggests they are best planted in open areas away from buildings, and in moist soil. I guess all n' all David, bad idea from the get go huh? :)

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 5920 posts Report Reply

  • Susan Snowdon,

    Alnus jurilensis, is what we sell Mexican alders as. Well known for growing in 'difficult', i.e. damp places, and going crazy.
    Also, setting the paddock on fire and having to call the fire brigade is pretty embarrassing. Kikyu grass has a secret weapon - big air pockets underneath.

    Since Mar 2008 • 94 posts Report Reply

  • Susan Snowdon,

    Or Alnus acuminata, evergreen alder.

    Since Mar 2008 • 94 posts Report Reply

  • dyan campbell,

    There is Italian, Alnus Cordata (12m) or , Glutinosa native to Europe, Asia or North Africa,(18-20m), Incana,also native of Europe and North America(15m) but no Mexicano.

    Mexico is in North America though, Sofie.

    auckland • Since Dec 2006 • 595 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    Or Alnus acuminata, evergreen alder.

    Thanks. I don't think I'll be growing any. :)
    @ Dyan
    I was thinking that after it was too latte to edit. Plus my research had shown my mistakes also.

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 5920 posts Report Reply

  • recordari,

    Now you've gone all botanical on us. Where have all the fire-starters gone?

    Too soon for Prodigy?

    AUCKLAND • Since Dec 2009 • 2607 posts Report Reply

  • webweaver,

    oh I think it's never too soon for the Prodigy...

    I too feel left out cos I've never set anything on fire either. Happy for it to stay that way, natch.

    On the other hand I have spun my American car into the path of an oncoming truck the first day I drove it (wrong side of road, wrong side of car, automatic with power steering and brakes, none of which I'd experienced before) - does that count?

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 329 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    does that count?

    1 over here for no. Accidents are a dime a dozen. Aren't they??:)

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 5920 posts Report Reply

  • webweaver,

    ah but I didn't actually get collided with by said truck. It stopped about an inch away from the back of my car. Hey! It musta been a MIRACLE!

    (That slow-mo thing you get when you're in the middle of impending doom is quite cool though)

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 329 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    (That slow-mo thing you get when you're in the middle of impending doom is quite cool though)

    Yeah, I had one after skidding on black ice and going into a cork screw through a ditch and having the roof cave in as it was happening. My impendus doom came with a "How on earth am I going to pay for this now?" but the slow-mo was a trip all in itself.

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 5920 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    I've never set anything on fire either

    Well, except a crowd of over 10,000

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16272 posts Report Reply

  • webweaver,

    I've never set anything on fire either

    Well, except a crowd of over 10,000

    OK that really did make me laugh out loud. Heh.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 329 posts Report Reply

  • Dave Patrick,

    Almost set fire to the kitchen once, but ended up just singeing the mat on top of the microwave and wrecking the seals on the microwave doors - who knew that the old-fashioned yoghurt pots with the paper labels, when filled with mashed vegetable for the youngsters, would actually catch fire if you microwaved them too high for too long?

    Rangiora, Te Wai Pounamu • Since Nov 2006 • 232 posts Report Reply

  • Peter Ashby,

    When we moved into this brick pebbledashed 3 bed semi here in Dundee there was this mountain gum in the front garden, in the corner. The problem was it had been planted mighty close to the front wall (3 blocks high) and was leaning on it, there was already a scar across it. The prevailing westerlies were rocking it causing the roots on the west side to pull out of the ground and the other side then to rub on the wall.

    So I got a couple of beefy stakes (no, not steaks) and some of that rubber interlinked plant strapping and hauled the gum back from the fence to allow those roots to get some purchase. The years passed, the roots got their purchase and I removed the stakes, one at a time. The tree flourished and grew. I pruned it so most of the mass was pulling it back over our garden. It grew again and this northern winter I was going to prune it again. Except that it snowed and froze and snowed and froze and I was not going to try and ground a ladder in that lot.

    So enter the equinoctical gales, only this year they were from the NE, opposite to normal. I got up the next morning, Saturday and looked out the window: why can't I see all the gum tree? move closer and the gum tree was solidly IN the front garden, and the neighbours having part demolished the low boundary wall and taking out half the rhododendron and the cable connection (net, phone, tv all gone).

    As we chopped it up and extracted the stump it became clear that it had no, absolutely no, roots against the front, Eastern wall. It had a big root running North and a smaller but still substantial set South under the boundary wall. So blown by the NE it just rotated around those two roots and fell.

    By rescuing it in the first place and thus allowed it to grow I had pretty much ordained that this was going to happen sooner or later. It's replacement (possibly a nice blue conifer) will by much further back from both walls.

    Dundee, Scotland • Since May 2007 • 425 posts Report Reply

  • andrew llewellyn,

    Wow, awesome. i think that trumps any of my DIY disasters, and they are legion.

    Since Nov 2006 • 2073 posts Report Reply

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