Field Theory by Hadyn Green

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Field Theory: Things that go bump in the night

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  • Sam F,

    I can handle a little uncanny valley. It's splatter/torture stuff that I hate; I have seen none of the Saw or Hostel films, and don't plan to, ever. Imagination is already overactive and I'm not feeding it that kind of stuff - just don't need it.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1609 posts Report Reply

  • Hadyn Green,

    I can totally handle splatter and gore (I am just not interested in Saw et al). In fact there is some gore in Quarantine that I sat through quite happily. Well not "happily"

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 2090 posts Report Reply

  • Emma Hart,

    Hadyn, what happened to our division of labour policy? Not only are you now keeping my hours, but you're scared by what scares me too?

    Alien = scary
    Aliens = gory not scary

    My kids have almost open access to my bookshelves. I've told my son to let me know when he doesn't want to sleep for a week and I'll give him The Shining .

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4650 posts Report Reply

  • Hadyn Green,

    The Shining is, hands down, the scariest film I have ever seen (I never read the book despite being a big King fan as a teenager). The scene where Shelley Duvall walks up the stairs and sees a person in a bear suit is fucking terrifying.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 2090 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    The Shining = most definitely not scary. Stephen King in fact colourfully lambasted Kubrick for his total cluelessness in this regard on more than one public occasion.

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7473 posts Report Reply

  • Simon Bennett,

    I've seen The Shining several times over the years, and still find it terrifying. The twin girls: "Come and play with us Danny, forever and ever and ever"...

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 167 posts Report Reply

  • Joanna,

    The scene where Shelley Duvall walks up the stairs and sees a person in a bear suit is fucking terrifying.

    You are incorrect. Anything with anyone in bear costumes is awesome. It is a Truth Universally Acknowledged!

    My kids have almost open access to my bookshelves.

    Give them Lunar Park or The House of Leaves if you ever miss them sleeping in your bed...

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 746 posts Report Reply

  • Rob Hosking,

    werewolves ever were the ones in Harry Potter (followed by the Nazis in American Werewolf in London)

    I only recall being totally freaked out by a fillum once as a kid - a TV movie called 'Satan's Triangle'.

    It showed on NZ tv in about 1977. Kim Novak had an evil smile and turned into the Devil at the end. It was freaky.

    American Werewolf in London didn't scare me because it had what seemed at the time to be a really hot sex scene in it. (Come on, I was 16...). That's all I remember about it. I haven't seen it since.

    South Roseneath • Since Nov 2006 • 830 posts Report Reply

  • Hadyn Green,

    The scariest "book" I read was a Stephen King short story (his best work was in short stories) about a kid who meets the devil in the forest somewhere in (surprise!) Maine.

    The Shining = most definitely not scary

    Giovanni you tough old bastard. What is the scariest film then?

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 2090 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    Giovanni you tough old bastard. What is the scariest film then?

    Can I also say that I'm the whimpiest man on earth? But evidently I don't cover the whole spectrum because while I enjoyed The Shining, part of the reason why I enjoyed it is that it didn't scare me, and being scared makes me fill ill. But you can see everything happen such a mile off, and I'm sorry but the twins, the bear suit... they really are barely perturbing, let alone scary.

    As for the scariest film, I don't know, I can say that as a lad I was quite honestly terrified by the early Dario Argento flicks, which I more or less saw as a dare. Profondo Rosso... cripes.

    I'm with you on the Nazis in American Werewolf in London. While the rest of my family laughed it off as a kitsch romp, I was under the table.

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7473 posts Report Reply

  • Sam F,

    I've heard good things about Suspiria . And by good I mean bricks were shat.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1609 posts Report Reply

  • Rogan Polkinghorne,

    I heard 'Rec' was supposed to be the 'scariest movie ever made'...but then when I watched it, it took me straight to Letdown City. Yaaaawn...

    Scariest story I've ever read was a Stephen King short story about a guy talking to his therapist about how the Boogie Man had stolen his family...and then his therapist turns out to be the Boogie Man. BOOM! Never even saw it coming...

    A-town • Since Nov 2006 • 105 posts Report Reply

  • Jackie Clark,

    I can remember going to see Texas Chainsaw Massacre in the early 80's. About the same time was when Friday the Thirteenth et al came out as well, I think. I discovered I do not like horror movies. Surprise.

    Mt Eden, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3136 posts Report Reply

  • Emma Hart,

    I've heard good things about Suspiria. And by good I mean bricks were shat.

    Oo, thanks Sam, I'd forgotten about Suspiria, that was well creepy.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4650 posts Report Reply

  • Hadyn Green,

    Suspiria: The Only Thing More Terrifying Than The Last 12 Minutes Of This Film Are The First 92.

    Sounds interesting, but if it's actually scary I'm probably not going to see it. Any zombies in it?

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 2090 posts Report Reply

  • giovanni tiso,

    No zombies in Suspiria, no. Some pretty vicious killings. Boy.

    Wellington • Since Jun 2007 • 7473 posts Report Reply

  • Emma Hart,

    No zombies in Suspiria, no. Some pretty vicious killings. Boy.

    A review of this movie appears in Peter Nicholls' Fantastic Cinema under the heading 'Are Italians Sadists?'

    I'm just sayin'.

    It's vicious, but it's also... eerie. Unsettling. Uncanny valley, except the valley is an art deco ballet school.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4650 posts Report Reply

  • Kumara Republic,

    Funny thing is, horror films have always bored me. If any films do make me jump, they'd probably be political dystopia films such as Sleeping Dogs or V for Vendetta.

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5414 posts Report Reply

  • Evan Yates,

    There are a few common factors to horror and suspense movies that I have thought about over the years. Some affect me more than others.

    Warning - Here be spoilers

    1. Made you Jump! - example : the hand-from-the-grave in Carrie , any of the Friday the Thirteenth series. Good for an adrenaline shot but almost always followed by a laugh.

    2. Corruption of the Loved - example : The Omen . This one really gets me. I know my son can be a handful, but even if he was actually the spawn of Satan, could I bring myself to do what Damien's father tries to do? (See, I can't even type it out un-euphemistically)

    3. Corruption of the Body - example : The Fly . The original scared the bejeesus out of me as a kid. The remake (with Jeff Goldblum) was more revolting than scary. But as a metaphor for the inevitable breakdown of the body due to the aging process, it becomes more scary as you get older.

    4. Who Can you Trust? - example : The Thing . With no outside help available how do you tell who is the monster when they all look like normal people? Don't fall asleep or you'll find out the answer... most unpleasantly.

    5. The Unseen Threat - example : Alien , of course. Unfortunately the monster can never remain concealed and this spoils 99% of monster movies as the revealed creature is usually a bit of a laugh.

    I'm sure Geoff Lealand in his expert capacity can expand on this brief list.

    Hamiltron, Te Ika-a-Māui • Since Nov 2006 • 197 posts Report Reply

  • TroyHoward,

    Watership Down = Hands Down most traumatising film ever experienced by kids of our generation. That beating exposed heart in the drain pipe. Holy Sheeat. WTF were my parents thinking.

    The Omen - Still have memories of sneaking down the stairs and peaking through the rails to see the journalist beheaded by the panes of glass.

    Ahh I love reminiscing about reminiscing.

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 78 posts Report Reply

  • Hadyn Green,

    There are a few common factors to horror and suspense movies that I have thought about over the years

    Here are the three ingredients to most horror films (no spoilers):

    1. Sin - someone does something ethically questionable (sex, drugs, stealing, murder)

    2. Punishment - the evil whatever (undead dude with a machete for example) kills a bunch of the people who did the sinning

    3. Redemption - one of the sinners kills the evil and, through some measure of penance, is redeemed.

    Unsurprisingly these line up perfectly to a three act structure.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 2090 posts Report Reply

  • Evan Yates,

    @haydn, I agree compeletely.

    Sin, Punishment, Redemption/Salvation - is a whole horror sub-genre all by itself.

    Hamiltron, Te Ika-a-Māui • Since Nov 2006 • 197 posts Report Reply

  • Sam F,

    Sin, Punishment, Redemption/Salvation - is a whole horror sub-genre all by itself.

    Nothing Mel Gibson couldn't have told us...

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1609 posts Report Reply

  • David Hamilton,

    So the Communist threat of the Bodysnatchers became the consumer-culture zombies of Dawn of the Dead which became the anger-fuelled hordes in 28 Days Later which became (for some reason) CGI vampires trying to kill Will Smith.

    It should be noted that I Am Legend in various forms predates the crappy Will Smith version by quite a bit. I've only seen The Last Man On Earth with Vincent Price but it was much, much better.

    Saw The Shining the other night, it had some genuinely creepy parts, mainly because of Kubrick's wonderfully unsettling sense of timing.

    Hamiltron • Since Nov 2006 • 111 posts Report Reply

  • ScottY,

    Watership Down = Hands Down most traumatising film ever experienced by kids of our generation. That beating exposed heart in the drain pipe. Holy Sheeat. WTF were my parents thinking.

    Oh yeah. I remember watching that as a kid and realising suddenly that the world was a very cruel place. I still feel sad whenever I hear the cheesy theme song (I recall it was a minor hit at the time), remembering those poor fluffy rabbits and how they all snuffed it.

    The Shining is one of the better horror films. I also remember being freaked out by The Exorcist, although it has been parodied so many times it's probably no longer scary.

    West • Since Feb 2009 • 794 posts Report Reply

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