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Speaker: Rethinking NZ’s Emergency Aid

68 Responses

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  • Jeremy Eade,

    I thought the principle of David's thinking was sound on an immediate economic level ,that is get food and essential markets flowing as soon as possible, the demise of a market place is the death of a city.

    auckland • Since Mar 2008 • 1112 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    Uh yeah. I'm sure there so many cities in Samoa, Tonga - so, I'm right with you jeremy Eade-

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes,

    get food and essential markets flowing as soon as possible, the demise of a market place is the death of a city.

    Or, indeed, a small Nation.

    Uh yeah. I'm sure there so many cities in Samoa, Tonga - so, I'm right with you jeremy Eade-

    It takes a village, apparently.
    Geez, you guys, can you stop splitting hairs.

    Peria • Since Dec 2006 • 5521 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    OK, a village (or series of villages) in very small countries where an aristocracy - or several aristocracries (I include the churches here as well as the more ancient chiefly ones)- still rule.
    And expect to be supported.
    It's not splitting hairs Steve B.
    Just review the ferry disaster.
    Just take a look at what was supposed to be a tsunami warning system.
    Just tell me why we (ANZ) should prop up any of this kind of crap.

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Jeremy Eade,

    alternative ideas are essential in 2009

    auckland • Since Mar 2008 • 1112 posts Report Reply

  • Jeremy Eade,

    get the kids eating as fast as you can. that's just a code.

    auckland • Since Mar 2008 • 1112 posts Report Reply

  • andin,

    Banks just seem to be looking to screw over the islands.

    Is this just your opinion, or do you have information that's backs this up.

    I would suggest that people who have relatives in New Zealand, possibly working, are probably going to be the ones better off back in the islands, and best able to cope with a disaster.
    And two, there's a heap of people on the islands who don't have family in New Zealand. Are we ignoring them?

    Well how about a scheme to help fly those who want to and are able to help in times of emergency back to do just that.
    For those who dont have family in NZ? From my visits to the islands in just about every village, there were friends or family overseas working somewhere. But for those who dont the services "on the ground" are there to help these people.
    To "Identify the most need, and give the most support."

    Geez, you guys, can you stop splitting hairs.

    I thought in the game of politics hair splitting was the best bit.

    raglan • Since Mar 2007 • 1881 posts Report Reply

  • Peter Ashby,

    One of my concerns about David Shearer's proposal is the non stated assumption that the populations in New Zealand are an evenly distributed sample of the populations in the Islands. I am not at all sure that this is true. So if you are going to do this then you need a system both to determine if you are giving the aid to people whose relatives are indeed in need AND to determine those who do not have access to those remittances and so will need other assistance. This looks extremely messy and inconsistent way of ensuring that all who need aid will receive it.

    Dundee, Scotland • Since May 2007 • 425 posts Report Reply

  • Just thinking,

    The remittance issue also needs to address the 1965 repeal of NZ residency to Samoans.

    If we seek to play a part in the Pacific, this would greatly strengthen our position and enable an increased ability for wider remittance payments to the islands, beyond aid.

    When we look back to our impact upon Samoa by massacre and diease, sorry doesn't cut it, but this would.

    Putaringamotu • Since Apr 2009 • 1158 posts Report Reply

  • Matthew Poole,

    Well how about a scheme to help fly those who want to and are able to help in times of emergency back to do just that.

    Who would coordinate it? Ensure the people flying back are needed? Ensure that, on their arrival, they're not going to be a burden on a society that's already been damaged and is reliant on aid?
    This isn't hair splitting, either, they're real problems. One of the biggest issues for disaster relief is people who show up out of the blue offering assistance, but who have no training or experience and who have no way of feeding or housing themselves and must, instead, draw on the relief effort. That's distinctly unhelpful.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2007 • 4097 posts Report Reply

  • andin,

    Who would coordinate it?

    I nominate Michael Jones.
    Kyle suggested rather than sending money people would rather send themselves. A natural response if your friends/family have been thru not only a disaster, almost any tragedy.
    I would hope that these people are guided by those co ordinating the relief effort as to what is the best way in which they could help.

    raglan • Since Mar 2007 • 1881 posts Report Reply

  • Matthew Poole,

    I would hope that these people are guided by those co ordinating the relief effort as to what is the best way in which they could help.

    In the absence of specialist training or an explicitly-stated need, the best way to help is to donate cash. Failing cash, talk to the recipient aid organisation about what else they need. There is no shortcut around the hard-won experience of the likes of Red Cross, which is that the best donation is cash that can then be used to purchase whatever else is required.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2007 • 4097 posts Report Reply

  • andin,

    I think we are in agreement.
    Wow Tiger has done a football team, heading for a rugby team, then 18 holes.

    raglan • Since Mar 2007 • 1881 posts Report Reply

  • Kyle Matthews,

    Kyle suggested rather than sending money people would rather send themselves.

    Umm, no I didn't.

    Since Nov 2006 • 6243 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    In the absence of specialist training or an explicitly-stated need, the best way to help is to donate cash.

    All the way back around to David Shearers suggestion then,

    The best contribution is cash.

    .

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Islander,

    Yes indeed - cash is what is needed (and which my whanau did donate via the Red Cross) BUT not cash going through churches...that's where we jib-

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • buzzy,

    Church plays an important role in the Samoan and Tongan communities. If you're trying to distribute aid it makes sense to involve church groups. Isn't it worth at least considering?

    You're suggesting that church groups are more effective at distributing aid than aid organisations? I find that hard to believe, with the possible exception of the Sallies.

    If giving cash to the families and churches of affected people can be *proven* to be more effective that funding aid organisations and providing direct government-run aid, then I'd be all for it. Unfortunately Shearer's contention that accountability "should not be difficult" is the hopeful-at-best thinking.

    Wellington • Since Apr 2009 • 20 posts Report Reply

  • andin,

    Umm, no I didn't.

    Apoplogies if I misquoted you.

    raglan • Since Mar 2007 • 1881 posts Report Reply

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