Posts by Russell Brown

Last ←Newer Page 1 2 3 4 5 Older→ First

  • Access: The Meltdown,

    One of the Susan Boyle news reports used the word "tantrum", which, to put it mildly, annoyed me.

    A MELTDOWN IS NOT A TANTRUM, HOWEVER MUCH IT MIGHT LOOK LIKE ONE

    A tantrum is deliberate. If you have seen your own child (in this case, our younger son) looking out from a meltdown, scared of what's happening, and gradually learning some ways to deal with it, you'll understand that.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 20929 posts Report Reply

  • Speaker: Talking past each other:…, in reply to Rebecca Gray,

    Thing is, people HAVE actually been making some very worthwhile points among the rest of that noise. And some of those points only seem to be at cross-purposes because the commentators are concentrating on different sides to the issue or different terminology for similar issues.

    Thanks Rebecca. We'll have you back :-)

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 20929 posts Report Reply

  • Speaker: Talking past each other:…, in reply to Carol Stewart,

    This also seems like a good approach.

    Nice. I'm (trying) to write something that covers a similar approach to drug policy, per Tuari Potiki's UN speech.

    Papa Nahi, who was on our show this week talking about drug policy, is also quoted in this story on an initiative by a Ngāti Whātua sports club to stop offering sugary drinks at its clubrooms. Simple, community-driven.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 20929 posts Report Reply

  • Access: The Meltdown, in reply to Hilary Stace,

    If there is a next time for your son to visit Wellington I could ask mine to act as tour guide, including the best places to go by public transport.

    Sounds good to me :-)

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 20929 posts Report Reply

  • Speaker: Talking past each other:…,

    I've been mulling over posting this for a day or so but I can't get it out of my head:

    Cognitive Impairment: A Hidden Consequence of the Childhood Obesity Epidemic

    The impact of obesity and metabolic disorders on cognition seems to be well established, but the particular impact on children is really upsetting. It compounds any existing disadvantage early in life. The NYU study above and this smaller one did find a direct and proportional relationship to overweight.

    Admirably, the NYU researchers are acting on their findings:

    At-risk kids receive user-friendly reports of their medical results along with information for the whole family about how to turn things around before the child develops type 2 diabetes. “The MRI studies should also help elucidate some of the pathways affected by insulin resistance and obesity, and lead to new treatments to help mitigate these risks,” Convit says.

    This seems a good approach.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 20929 posts Report Reply

  • Speaker: Talking past each other:…, in reply to giovanni tiso,

    I’m not buying this. If “problem” is the same as a disease but without a definition, it’s just a sloppy way of saying disease. And I insist we should guard against sloppy use of over-charged language.

    For my sins, I do seem to have started this by using the phrase "public health problem developing", in relation to Type 2 diabetes and child obesity. Somewhere along the way it appears to have switched to an argument about whether "problem" is a synonym for disease.

    I do think that when the World Health Organisation is using words like "crisis" and "epidemic", "problem" doesn't seem to be a particularly over-charged word. But I don't think there's anything to be gained from pursuing the argument through any further iterations.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 20929 posts Report Reply

  • Speaker: Talking past each other:…, in reply to giovanni tiso,

    What’s the difference between a health problem and a disease?

    I guess that "health problem" is descriptive where "disease" has a definition. The AMA has definitions of condition, disease and disorder, noting that "Condition is perhaps the least specific, often denoting states of health considered normal or healthy but nevertheless posing implications for the provision of health care (eg, pregnancy)."

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 20929 posts Report Reply

  • Speaker: Talking past each other:…, in reply to giovanni tiso,

    And frankly I would have far less of a problem with the sugar tax if we were also doing all the other things that researchers and public health advocates have been suggesting for years, chief of which is giving poor people more money.

    That would certainly be good.

    But although the most deprived New Zealand households are hugely over-represented in the Ministry of Health's childhood obesity figures, they're still less than half the total. As the ministry says says, it "spans demographics".

    So it think it does make sense to also target the sources of excess calories, although I'm not sure whether a sugar tax is the best way to do that.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 20929 posts Report Reply

  • Speaker: Talking past each other:…, in reply to giovanni tiso,

    It’s still not a condition, which is what saying it’s a health problem means.

    I think professional acceptance of obesity as a health problem is very widespread. The more edgy argument is whether it should be called a disease. The American Medical Association officially deemed it a disease in 2013, although not without controversy. The principal objection was the inadequacy of BMI as a measure, but the delegates who voted also addressed another argument:

    "The suggestion that obesity is not a disease but rather a consequence of a chosen lifestyle exemplified by overeating and/or inactivity is equivalent to suggesting that lung cancer is not a disease because it was brought about by individual choice to smoke cigarettes."

    There are some pro-and-anti arguments collected here. Ironically (or sadly), almost all of the it's-not-a-disease arguments are overt fat-shaming of the just-pull-up-your-socks variety

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 20929 posts Report Reply

  • Speaker: Talking past each other:…, in reply to Rebecca Gray,

    Kia ora tatou,
    Thanks for your comments – I hadn’t decided til now whether to weigh in.

    Kia ora Rebecca. Thanks for joining it – I can imagine it has looked a little daunting at times!

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 20929 posts Report Reply

Last ←Newer Page 1 3 4 5 6 7 2088 Older→ First