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Access: The Blue Inhaler

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  • Joe Wylie, in reply to Hilary Stace,

    To be fair that price covered a lot of sessions and phone support for life

    Which makes me wonder about the method's limitations. For example, it might be overly complex for someone with a cognitive disability. Having done the parental mercy dash to school camp with forgotten medication more than once in the past, the idea of a replacement technique sounds great in theory.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4591 posts Report Reply

  • linger, in reply to Joe Wylie,

    BBT unequivocally does not work by the mechanism originally claimed for it. Nevertheless, many people using it report some benefit. This suggests that the main mechanism of operation may be as a placebo.
    Happily,
    (i) asthma is a condition exacerbated by stress, and so it may be expected to respond quite well to placebo; and
    (ii) the expense, and long-term course of interactive training, and increase in patients’ perception of conscious control over their symptoms, and availability of reassuring support, are all design features that together make BBT one of the most effective placebos possible (right up there with fake surgical interventions, which tend to have a very high success rate).

    So I am certainly not suggesting that BBT is of no medical benefit.
    If you find it works for you, then I am happy that it works for you.
    But without a clinically proven mechanism, that still may not be a good enough reason for it to be officially recommended as a treatment option.

    Tokyo • Since Apr 2007 • 1886 posts Report Reply

  • Hilary Stace,

    Does anyone know the difference between all the different asthma groups? There seems to be a foundation and a society and some other organisations. Wonder if any of them mention buteyko?

    Wgtn • Since Jun 2008 • 3196 posts Report Reply

  • Rosemary McDonald, in reply to Hilary Stace,

    Wonder if any of them mention buteyko?

    A very quick google search would suggest that around the world various asthma societies are warming to Buteyko. More interesting is recent research that seems to indicate that "dysfunctional breathing" is common in those with asthma and that retraining can reduce the need for meds.

    If I had more time I'd do a lit review....but if I were asthmatic....I'd certainly give buteyko a try....if only to avoid steroids.

    Waikato, or on the road • Since Apr 2014 • 1344 posts Report Reply

  • Brodie Davis, in reply to Hilary Stace,

    I found this PDF, which would suggest they have at least been talking about it since 2012.

    http://asthmafoundation.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Whatis_Buteyko.pdf
    (the copyright in this is 2010).

    Another thing is that they may need to tune their advise to the lowest common denominator (ie someone who won't do the techniques correctly no matter how often they are shown etc) and for that level/type of person maybe the drugs are the only thing that works consistently. Also it starts getting pretty slipperly slope, if Buteyko (which makes some pretty dubious claims) gets coverage what about other potentially more quack based techniques.

    Since Aug 2008 • 54 posts Report Reply

  • Rosemary McDonald,

    From what I'm reading, and from the website, if the proponents of buteyko are claiming to be able to 'cure' anything it is the bad habit of mouth breathing.

    And if the testimonials are genuine, this re training has been life changing for some.

    Also....it is really difficult trying to find research that is a) not funded by a drug company or b) published in some fringe type mag.

    Waikato, or on the road • Since Apr 2014 • 1344 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie, in reply to Rosemary McDonald,

    ...if the proponents of buteyko are claiming to be able to 'cure' anything it is the bad habit of mouth breathing.

    They'll be getting no support from the Trump/Palin camp then.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4591 posts Report Reply

  • Rosemary McDonald,

    Waikato, or on the road • Since Apr 2014 • 1344 posts Report Reply

  • walrus, in reply to Rosemary McDonald,

    No mention that anyone is considering having words with, let alone disciplining, the teacher, of course...

    Are people these days not able to recognise a medical emergency, or to round up to medical emergency if they're not sure? I could understand the teacher stopping to PHONE the nurse, but email?? If my imaginary child has an asthma attack and dies while I'm waiting for a response to an email to a nurse about it, I'm pretty sure the standard American response is to arrest me for something on the continuum between child neglect and manslaughter.

    Next point not addressed in the Stuff piece: where were the girl's meds? 'cause she clearly knew what was happening and would have reached for them if she had them. My guess is they're locked in a cupboard in the nurse's office because, you know, they're dangerous, and what do kids know about using their own medications anyway? (Not that it's just kids. I'm sure we've all read pieces about the not uncommon adverse consequences of hospitals' tendency to take diabetics' insulin away from them on admission.)

    (Even more tangentially: I have been tutted at for having brought my own [non-asthma] medications with me when being admitted to hospital, and made to promise not to use them. One is supposed to rely on the nurses to administer everything at the correct intervals and dosages and to note same down on the chart. I won't comment on the track record there! I have then, later, been visited by the hospital pharmacist who has a "thank God" response [more professionally phrased] when I produce my own meds because two of them they don't keep in stock and one they can't get in for several days.)

    Auckland • Since Jan 2015 • 13 posts Report Reply

  • Rosemary McDonald, in reply to walrus,

    (Even more tangentially: I have been tutted at for having brought my own [non-asthma] medications with me when being admitted to hospital, and made to promise not to use them. One is supposed to rely on the nurses to administer everything at the correct intervals and dosages and to note same down on the chart. I won’t comment on the track record there! I have then, later, been visited by the hospital pharmacist who has a “thank God” response [more professionally phrased] when I produce my own meds because two of them they don’t keep in stock and one they can’t get in for several days.)

    I'm happy to go off on your tangent walrus.

    Himself was admitted through A&E some twenty years ago with haematemesis...vomiting blood. Not very nice at all. This was after an epidural for day surgery had resulted in the most god awful of headaches once he got home. Hospital said give him panadol...which in tablet form was enough to tip his already drug overloaded system over the edge. We had already begun to take a long hard look at the prescribed meds he was on...and the side effects and contra indications. One drug was a stand out for gastric bleeds, and he had already decided to stop taking it. (It was a prophylactic drug...and he was willing to 'risk' it.) Nurse came round with the drug trolley and Himself refused the Hiprex. Well, nurse not happy at all. "But it's charted!" he sputtered, as if refusal was tantamount to treason, "you have to take it!" "Well actually, no I don't" he said. I being the then diplomatic one asked the nurse to look up the drug in New Ethicals and check out the side effects and contra indications. "Not recommended in cases of GI bleed". "What has Mr Just Vomited His Guts Out been admitted for?" I asked...."Uh".

    You make a very good point about 'patients' being trusted to be responsible for their own medications and I believe there should be greater emphasis on partnerships between the patient and their doctors for those with long term conditions.
    We hear about that 'partnership' concept, but when patients actually try to exercise some autonomy...there are some sticklers who plain don't like it.

    Now...where are those stats about treatment injury and medical mishaps in New Zealand hospitals?

    Waikato, or on the road • Since Apr 2014 • 1344 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19680 posts Report Reply

  • Rosemary McDonald, in reply to Sacha,

    tangential bureaucracy

    I read that, and all I could think of for a while was one of the more off the wall Monty Python sketches.

    Then I got really, really angry.

    Petty fucking bureaucrats.

    Please God, let there be a particularly warm place in hell for them.

    Waikato, or on the road • Since Apr 2014 • 1344 posts Report Reply

  • Hilary Stace,

    This Way Up on Radio NZ just had an interesting piece on asthma and the ventolin inhaher

    Wgtn • Since Jun 2008 • 3196 posts Report Reply

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