Capture by A photoblog

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Capture: Two Tripods, One Night

496 Responses

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  • Lilith __, in reply to Ian Dalziel,

    Koala cam?

    Just for the lols, here's a koala on cam

    Dunedin • Since Jul 2010 • 3886 posts Report Reply

  • David Hood, in reply to Lilith __,

    Where did you get the bolt?

    Hardware shop. Most consumer cameras take a 1/4 of an inch bolt (some larger professional camera are 1/3 of an inch, these cameras often come with adaptors).
    You are not like to find a bold short enough though. My solution was to add a couple of nuts until the bolt was the right length.

    Dunedin • Since May 2007 • 1443 posts Report Reply

  • Lilith __, in reply to David Hood,

    You are not like to find a bold short enough though

    Ah yes, the old don't-puncture-the-camera issue ;-)

    Thinking about it, I could probably use the half of my quick-release tripod attachment that goes onto the bottom of the camera: that already has a bolt the right size!

    Dunedin • Since Jul 2010 • 3886 posts Report Reply

  • JacksonP,

    In terms of the steady-cam dolly, Jos and I have talked about this before, and dreamed of various homemade versions. There’s no end of them on YouTube. Here’s one, made of, you guessed it, tubes.

    While I admire his innovation, I think he could have picked some more dramatic examples than the pots on the stove.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2011 • 2448 posts Report Reply

  • Lilith __, in reply to JacksonP,

    Still dreaming of dollies, at your age? ;-)

    Yeah that's clever with teh tubes. Not a koala in sight.

    Dunedin • Since Jul 2010 • 3886 posts Report Reply

  • JacksonP,

    Attachment

    Wind tree, with the cheat-sheet double exposure. 50mm f/22 1/6sec.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2011 • 2448 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

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    No tripod, one night, Piccadilly Circus. :) I find state of play has much to do with balance, steadiness and framing. This shot ,drunk :)

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes,

    All this talk of dollys and cranes and night shots reminds me of This Guy Tom Lowe.
    Saw some of his early stuff a few years back and still watch it in awe now. Can't find a copy on line of the stuff I have but here is a trailer for his upcoming feature.

    Really worth looking for a hi res copy though.
    Here's one on Vimeo which I can't embed.

    Peria • Since Dec 2006 • 5521 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    Attachment

    Last night. Outside lights out side.

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes,

    While we're on the subject. Here's something I found from a local, goes by the name, The Pitbull Press.
    Can't embed so here's a Link to Vimeo Auckland Timelapse 2011

    Peria • Since Dec 2006 • 5521 posts Report Reply

  • Jonathan Ganley,

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    The first photo in the “Two Tripods …” post of the Auckland skyline was taken a few weeks ago. How times change I thought, as I looked at the mass of tall buildings and the super yachts. The photo above was taken sometime in 1986, from approximately the same position, and with exactly the same camera – my trusty Nikon F3 – and 35mm lens. To add further pathos, I was at Silo Park last weekend photographing Doug Jerebine when I clicked the shutter, the mirror locked up, the shutter and meter refused to work, and it was all over for the F3 and me after 27 happy years. Not worth fixing.

    Since Dec 2006 • 234 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca, in reply to Jonathan Ganley,

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    How times change I thought,

    I have these two images, and I thought similar but in a completely irrelevant way.
    I give you before....

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    Attachment

    ....And, after. The evening was spent :)

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie, in reply to Jonathan Ganley,

    I clicked the shutter, the mirror locked up, the shutter and meter refused to work, and it was all over for the F3 and me after 27 happy years.

    Maybe it sensed the impending end of Ektachrome.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4585 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Jonathan Ganley,

    Not worth fixing.

    bugger. so it was terminal

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19538 posts Report Reply

  • Jonathan Ganley,

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    The shot above must have been amongst the first for me from that fine camera ... Grafton Bridge 1985.

    Maybe it sensed the impending end of Ektachrome

    Could be. Actually, I had a roll of Kodak Tri-X in there at the time. Just started using it again and it's still good.

    so it was terminal

    Unfortunately yes. The Nikon agent can't get the parts, anyway.

    Since Dec 2006 • 234 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Jonathan Ganley,

    Grafton Bridge 1985

    I have some from the following year and the other direction when a certain someone helps me scan them.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19538 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes, in reply to Jonathan Ganley,

    I had a roll of Kodak Tri-X in there at the time.

    Used to be my fave, you could push that bugger so far you could take pictures of black cats in dark rooms that weren't even there.
    :o-]

    Peria • Since Dec 2006 • 5521 posts Report Reply

  • Sofie Bribiesca, in reply to Sacha,

    certain someone helps me scan them.

    Well you just hurry them up Sacha. Would love your contribution. :)

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6796 posts Report Reply

  • JacksonP, in reply to Jonathan Ganley,

    Grafton Bridge 1985.

    What a great shot. That's the year I spent in International House, more or less in the shadow of the bridge. Somewhere I have some negatives from that time of night shots at the museum and Auckland Uni clock tower. Might have to go digging.

    Auckland • Since Mar 2011 • 2448 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Steve Barnes,

    Ilford XP1 chromogenic ftw - ISO 50-1600 on the same roll, all clear as.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19538 posts Report Reply

  • Steve Barnes, in reply to Sacha,

    I found the contrast dropped off over 800, I cursed myself for taking 20 rolls of the stuff to Nepal back in the early 80s. they didn’t do the Himalayas justice, mind you I don’t think any film or camera could. I used TriX more for bands and action shots, mostly Rugby strangely enough (not a big fan now it’s rammed down our throats).
    The remark about the cat, by the way, was actually true. A friend and I tried taking pictures of “ghosts”, shooting randomly in the dark, and pushed the old TriX to the equivalent of around 6400, just let it soak up the developer for god knows how long.
    When we checked out what we had, there was a cat and no way could it have been there, I didn’t have a cat.

    Peria • Since Dec 2006 • 5521 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Steve Barnes,

    more for bands and action shots, mostly Rugby strangely enough

    same. lots of indoor performances and outdoor sports in varying light

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19538 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie, in reply to Steve Barnes,

    I had a roll of Kodak Tri-X in there at the time.

    Used to be my fave, you could push that bugger so far you could take pictures of black cats in dark rooms that weren't even there.
    :o-]

    Seemingly miraculous stuff back in the day all right. It was reputed to be a recently ASA-boosted version of Tri-X 16mm reversal that got the ball rolling on Mother Theresa's rise to sainthood.
    From Christopher Hitchens’s The Missionary Position:

    When Malcolm Muggeridge did his 1969 BBC documentary about Ma Teresa, one day they were taken to what MT called ‘the House of the Dying.’ It was badly lit, and the director was doubtful they could film inside, but they had just received some new film made by Kodak, and the cameraman, Ken Macmillan, a very distinguished cameraman, Hitchens says, known for his work on Kenneth Clark’s Civilization, said let’s try it, and they did. Then when they got back to London and were watching the rushes they were surprised when the shots came up: they could see every detail. And Macmillan said ‘That’s amazing, that’s extraordinary,’ and was about to go on to say ‘three cheers for Kodak’ but he didn’t get a chance to say that. Muggeridge, in Macmillan’s words (page 27), “sitting in the front row, spun round and said: ‘It’s divine light! It’s Mother Teresa. You’ll find that it’s divine light, old boy.’” In a few days journalists started calling him saying they’d heard he’d witnessed a miracle. That’s good, isn’t it? Kodak comes up with a new film that works brilliantly in bad light – and Muggeridge declares it’s divine light.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4585 posts Report Reply

  • Islander, in reply to JacksonP,

    Skyward astral snail!

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

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