Hard News by Russell Brown

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Hard News: Public Address Word of the Year 2017

137 Responses

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  • Martin Brown,

    One more for 'Alternative Facts'

    Auckland • Since Mar 2013 • 136 posts Report Reply

  • Geoff Lealand,

    “look”, seeing that radio interviewees (politicians especially) preface every second statement with this (and it is so bloody annoying!!)

    Screen & Media Studies, U… • Since Oct 2007 • 2531 posts Report Reply

  • Vivid,

    Antifa

    Wairarapa • Since May 2015 • 43 posts Report Reply

  • Vivid,

    Incel

    Wairarapa • Since May 2015 • 43 posts Report Reply

  • Vivid,

    Cuck

    Wairarapa • Since May 2015 • 43 posts Report Reply

  • Matt Godfrey,

    Youthquake

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 16 posts Report Reply

  • JessicaRose,

    Just going to echo some of the ones I've read that I want to give a second for:

    Covfefe
    Let's do this
    Smashed avo
    Fake News

    Auckland • Since Sep 2011 • 56 posts Report Reply

  • JLM,

    Rangatahi. I wanted a te reo word and this is an appropriate one I learned this year.

    Judy Martin's southern sl… • Since Apr 2007 • 239 posts Report Reply

  • Ann Duncan,

    Tinned tomatoes

    New Zealand • Since Nov 2011 • 3 posts Report Reply

  • Juliet Moore,

    Frose!

    Frozen + Rose

    It's delicious, it merges two great things together and its 'so hot right now'!

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2017 • 1 posts Report Reply

  • Katharine Moody, in reply to Euan Mason,

    Wadeable

    Never heard before as a measure of water quality - so in that regard it is unique to NZ - and could only have come from a previous winner, that being 'Planet Key'.

    Wellington • Since Sep 2014 • 797 posts Report Reply

  • william blake, in reply to Juliet Moore,

    Portmanteau.

    Since Mar 2010 • 373 posts Report Reply

  • Kat L,

    The feels when (barf)
    Optics

    Auckland • Since May 2012 • 3 posts Report Reply

  • Trevor Nicholls,

    turnout

    Wellington, NZ • Since Nov 2006 • 305 posts Report Reply

  • Rachel Prosser,

    #iammetiria. : it opened up the debate on poverty

    Jacindamania

    #metoo

    Christchurch • Since Mar 2008 • 228 posts Report Reply

  • Rachel Prosser,

    Absolutely!

    Meaning 'quite'

    Christchurch • Since Mar 2008 • 228 posts Report Reply

  • Kat L,

    Thoughts & prayers

    Auckland • Since May 2012 • 3 posts Report Reply

  • Stephen C,

    Trumpism

    Auckland • Since Dec 2017 • 23 posts Report Reply

  • Stephen C,

    (Trumpism is a kind of disease - like botulism)

    Auckland • Since Dec 2017 • 23 posts Report Reply

  • Katita, in reply to Neil Heslop,

    I love omnishambles and use it often ;-)

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 59 posts Report Reply

  • Kat L,

    Dotard

    Auckland • Since May 2012 • 3 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Pattison,

    I can't see how 'Jacaindamania' didn't have the greatest impact on everyone here in NZ, certainly more so than any words that came in from overseas.

    'jacindamania' for word of the year. I've even added it to my dictionaries.

    Auckland • Since Aug 2014 • 24 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Pattison,

    Also thought I'd point out my entry, 'jacindamania', above was the first grammatically-correct rendering of the term ie: expressed as a common noun rather than a capitalised name or proper noun.

    Auckland • Since Aug 2014 • 24 posts Report Reply

  • TracyMac, in reply to Ian Pattison,

    I'd be interested in your citation re your coining being more grammatically "correct".

    Sure, we don't cap-up normal nouns in English, but since this one is based on a proper noun (belonging to a natural, live, person), it seems stylistically inelegant not to leave the cap in.

    In fact, I find many style guides and grammarians say just that, such as this discussion on uncapped eponyms:

    Some eponymous words are still capitalized like a proper noun, so those not capitalized are most clearly eponyms. The important, defining property is that the word does not refer exclusively to the person or place named by the proper noun, as does Marxism or Christian, but is used to refer to a general category, as do quisling, boycott and fuchsias ...

    In our example, we're definitely referring exclusively to one person.

    Canberra, West Island • Since Nov 2006 • 701 posts Report Reply

  • mark taslov, in reply to Ian Pattison,

    Attachment

    Given the neologism is such a blatant derivative of a globally recognised precedent, I’d let it be.

    Te Ika-a-Māui • Since Mar 2008 • 2281 posts Report Reply

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