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Capture: Headland Sculpture on the Gulf 2015

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  • Soon Lee,

    Thanks for the opportunity.

    By the way, that geometric sculpture? It's "Fragmented Interactions" by Gregor Kregar who is currently in the news.

    Auckland • Since Apr 2013 • 141 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    Thank you. How much did the location affect your response to these works, you reckon?

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19686 posts Report Reply

  • Soon Lee,

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    Location was definitely a factor, and sometimes made a big difference. There was some very thoughtful placement. Part of it was like walking through an Enchanted Forest or should that be Enchanted Bush with the anticipation of seeing the sculptural surprise round the next bend. In the open headland portion, it was a field of sculptures. I especially liked the way the James Bond popped up in photos of other sculptures.

    "Field Apart" with the mirrored columns reflect the surroundings so your experience of it depends hugely on weather and how busy it is. We went on an overcast day, and I expect it will look different on a blue-sky day.

    "Sculpture Walk" was laid out parallel to the walking path which was a nice touch; they were doing what we were doing.

    We first saw "Landform" from the path, but cordoned-off. You could get close enough to touch or walk around the earlier sculptures but not this one. I felt unsatisfied by this one until later on when we got far enough away to look back & take in the whole.

    "Colonial Fence - a modern day tinker", the number 8 wire one had traffic issues for me: you had to wait your turn to walk past it & I didn't feel like I could linger because I'd be holding up the people behind me.

    Auckland • Since Apr 2013 • 141 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    Gregor Kregar, he did good work with sheep a few years back. He had a small flock with woolly jumpers, at the Wellington Art gallery.

    I have no idea what the shapes and light cloud things mean, but he's being paid hundreds of thousands of dollars by city hall, to erect them. So they must be art, and his name is well known.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4316 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    “Field Apart” Angus Muir & Alexandra Heaney was my favourite. It’s 36 columns of mirrors & you get a different view with each step you take, not to mention when people walk around you or it.

    I think this work was installed at Splore last year. It's fabulous.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22754 posts Report Reply

  • mark taslov,

    Nice documenting Soon Lee, I had a wee chuckle at your description of the hold up at the traffic light. ‘Stop the Clock’ is my favorite.

    Te Ika-a-Māui • Since Mar 2008 • 2281 posts Report Reply

  • Hilary Stace,

    Lovely, thanks. I had heard about it so nice to see your photos. The dandelions look amazing on that hillside. How long is the sculpture walk there for?

    Wgtn • Since Jun 2008 • 3202 posts Report Reply

  • Soon Lee,

    On daily until February 15.

    Auckland • Since Apr 2013 • 141 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    “Field Apart” Angus Muir & Alexandra Heaney was my favourite. It’s 36 columns of mirrors & you get a different view with each step you take, not to mention when people walk around you or it.

    I think this work was installed at Splore last year. It’s fabulous.

    They work well on that part of waiheke. I remember the days I would set of on the ferry, to arrive at the tall buildings with class walls. The Air New Zealand building most notably.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4316 posts Report Reply

  • Soon Lee,

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    The Harbourview Sculpture Trail is open daily until the 28th. It's cheaper to get to than the Waiheke one (no ferry ride needed) & has more of a neighbourhood community vibe: includes pieces from local schools, and many of the sculptures are informed by the wetlands location & are also shout-outs to the local Te Atatu neighbourhood.

    "Reduce Reuse Recycle" Te Atatu Intermediate
    Look! It's the Auckland Harbour Bridge, and Sky Tower, using bottle tops.

    "Westree" Carolyn Lawrence
    Te Atatu is in West Auckland, geddit?

    "Playpill" Nicholas Mans
    This one's groovy and whimsical and serious all at the same time. You can push the pill gently to make it sway back & forth, but it's also about mental illness & the influence of pharmaceutical companies.

    More at my Flickr photoset.

    Auckland • Since Apr 2013 • 141 posts Report Reply

  • Soon Lee,

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    "flowerpower" Audrey Boyle
    From the Catalogue: "One hundred years ago, my great, great uncle William went off to WW1. The last sepia toned photo shows him standing among flowers, in which only the flowers have been coloured."

    "In the Bag: is enough enough?" Sally Kidall
    Another favourite. The location is tidal, and the tide was coming in when we visited so you could see the chair legs gradually getting submerged.

    Auckland • Since Apr 2013 • 141 posts Report Reply

  • Soon Lee,

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    Just one more...
    "Sway" Bev Goodwin & Jeff Thomson
    Kinetic, only a slight breeze is needed for the brightly painted wires sway & rotate.

    Auckland • Since Apr 2013 • 141 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to Soon Lee,

    “Reduce Reuse Recycle”

    Chchch folk who want to make their own need go no further than Creative Junk in Disraeli street - they have the 'gears'...
    :- )

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7889 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

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    This is a reasonable looking bit of wall to stick stuff. I do art, but I can't be arst trying to sell anything. These are some preliminary ideas and inspirations. I learned its called research from doing an art degree.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4316 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

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    I do painting and sculpture – weather permitting. My special trick is heavy industrial. I am a trained fabrication engineer – heavy. Thats a boiler maker. So partly why I went to Alang. There is lots of big bits of steel there.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4316 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

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    Documentary films have been made about Alang, where cameras where carefully aimed at making Green peace look important. The patronised population ( rather an enormous number of people ) responded by saying: fuck off. So foreign visitors are not allowed down where the ship braking happens. I obvious went there anyway. I'm an artist. I saw nothing to be alarmed about. Greenpeace no longer need to be appalled.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4316 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

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    These are not finished art works, these photos. They are sketches made carelessly on an iPhone. I captured a photo of a big steel ball because every time I visited over a two day period, it had moved. That must meant someone has been having fun with cranes and stuff.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4316 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

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    Everything gets recycled. I don't mean there are colour coded bins for sorting plastic from paper, so it looks all neat and tidy sitting on the curb. I meant are ships being recycled. And thats not the same as just send stuff the scrap metal dealers for cash.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4316 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

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    I new four lane road is being built the replace the aged two lane highway to Bhavnagar; fifty kilometres to the north. The new road is concrete and strong. all the rebar is spun locally, like at plants along side the motorway using the steel from the ships on the beach.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4316 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

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    So there's a few happy snaps of the big ship breaking place. I didn't take photos of skinny people being whipped by slave drivers who poor nuclear radiation into the drinking water. Sorry.

    My next sketch set is for my obsession with drinking water arts project.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4316 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    So before I start developing my drinking water project, I want to expand on the actual ship breaking theme. And no there is no excuse for poor spelling and grammar.

    Ship breaking is controversial and highly photogenic. It’s awesome to see huge parts of ship crashing to the ground on 35mm film stock. Alang is the worlds largest Ship knackers yard. It is ideal due to its 15 degree sloping beach, ten meter tides and fair weather.

    What attracts me to these places as an artist is multifaceted. Sculpture – the materials and facilities to work are on location. I can use parts of the subject and the environment as a conceptual closed loop. Marcel Duchamp; for anyone stumbling across this, I don’t just do garden art. There are multables of communication devises available. I mean whats commonly known as found object art, but the way I like to work isn’t to just place one object into an art gallery and call it art. I prefer to use objects with loaded associations as visual language building blocks for a constructed sculpture – narrative.

    So my plan isn’t to just make an artwork that sits in the garden, or in a building. Ive been to India. I’m going to transcend all that mundane stuff, to use the old meaning of the word.

    As you might be starting to see, this art planning process is fanning out. It’s going to go global, but then it’s going to need to also stand on is own feet. That might be where fabrication engineering, conceptual art tradition and international shipping converge. For example, Alang is where shipping containers ships go to die. The ships ghosts might be what I’m trying to communicate thru the use of objects from the ship. A shipping container could be one found object part of the whole sculpture. Shipping containers come loaded with meanings. They are good communication devises for classic conceptual sculpture.

    Enough already! But I think you get where I’m going from. Before I bring it all back to something real and grounded as an art work standing on its own feet.

    There are obviously multiple means to the end. I’m also licensed to use digital/analog film, ceramics and oil paint to make art.

    Then we get to narratives. A lot has been made of places like Alang in photo journalism and documentary film. Mostly the narrative has been pushing an environmental and or social justice agenda. These could have been motivated by assorts of ideologies, but the cynic in me, says it’s more often than not about the money, It can cost shitloads of money to go around crusading with documentary gear. I’m not saying anyone gets into environmental activism for the money. But the toys are definitely appetising. I’ve been about the Rainbow Warriors, both the first and second one. They where to die for. The Rainbow Warriors where the absolute cream on top on any big OE back packing goaty bearded wet dream.

    Rainbow Warrior 11, was recently scrapped on the beach in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4316 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to steven crawford,

    Ship shape...

    These are not finished art works, these photos.

    Love all those stacks of round port hole window glass (I assume).

    there must be a morphic resonance thing going on - I see the Sunday Star Times has a photo essay on a breaker beach in Gadani, Pakistan.

    Some years back I enjoyed the YA fiction book 'Ship Breaker' by Paolo Bacigalupi (whose other post-apocalyptic success was 'The Windup Girl' )

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7889 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    I see the Sunday Star Times has a photo essay on a breaker beach in Gadani, Pakistan.

    The manufacturer of that is Danial Eriksen, and he was interviewed on Rnz nights

    It makes harrowing listening as he said he missed out on seeing any child exploitation or anything, and that he's been floored by the experience. He recently had a well deserved holiday in french polynesia with his partner, and did a bit of surfing.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4316 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel,

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    <aside>
    Sad to note the recent passing of Light Master Bill Culbert
    Set your photon blasters to stun!

    https://laurentdelaye.wordpress.com/publications/ *source
    </aside>

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7889 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford,

    Love all those stacks of round port hole window glass (I assume).

    Yes, that particular lot specialises in glass. There is every shape of safety glass (I’m not going to imaginable). There is a 10km long road that has small business’s like that on ether side.

    One of my special areas of interest is the way the steel plate is utilised. I didn’t see any CNC technology on the ground, and my associates in Bhavnagar say that sort of work is normally preformed out of Ahmadabad.

    Alang probably has more magnetic profile cutting machines on a 10km stretch, than all of New Zealand. Magnetic profile cutting machines are manually operated copy machines for cutting steel shapes from a master. The Alang cutting machine operators are turning those bits of ships plate into finished products before the material gets shipped, so to speak. And they do the cutting with natural Gas.

    William Morris would be delighted.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4316 posts Report Reply

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