Hard News by Russell Brown

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Hard News: Dirty Politics

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  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to Moz,

    damn. For a moment there I thought that could help with the drought over here :)

    What you need over there is torrents of 'verjus signallers' and other sour grape sprayers...
    ;- )

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7887 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to John Farrell,

    Jacinda Ardern denies pushing for crusaders to change name after christchurch attacks,,,
    .. the twitter trolls are having orgasms over this….

    Mea Culpa – I wrote to the Crusaders management the day after the Mosque shootings here – exhorting them to front foot the issue of their name and to show some leadership and compassion, now that their inappropriate name was past its use-by-date – I’m sure many people wrote, but I note the Crusaders management use many of the words and phrases I used in their press releases .
    I note the usual suspects (the odious) Mike Yardley and petition starters don’t seem to be able to come up with a better argument for retaining the name than ‘It was ever thus’ (well since 1996)
    with useful insights like “There’s no connection, apart from a historical name that really has no association at all.” (so they have finally got rid of the sword waving blood red horse men with flaming Templar crosses on their livery – hardly redolent of medieval slaughter at all,… right?)
    But you can’t take a benefit from the ‘verb’ without taking a hit from the ‘noun’ and history!
    Of course the ever tolerant and inclusive Yardley intones:

    Meanwhile, just as the Crusaders rugby team have been the subject of an over-reactive pile-on by the warriors of woke, determined to takedown their name, the purge campaign knows no bounds.
    As I predicted a fortnight ago, the city’s name is now under attack by the same virtue-signallers. This drippy liberal brigade is now rounding on the most towering Christchurch symbol of all: the Christ Church Cathedral.

    Dunkin’ (Donut) Garner also peddles more of the same

    They’ve ditched the horses, so the symbolism has gone. Now let’s get back to the footy, says Duncan Garner.

    Oh did I mention Mike Hosking excusing Joe Biden last week - wittering on about 'social morays!!' - plonker!
    These people are such shallow thinkers.
    sigh…

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7887 posts Report Reply

  • linger, in reply to Ian Dalziel,

    social morays

    All together now:
    “When an eel swimming by
    Bites a chunk from your thigh
    That’s a moray…”

    Tokyo • Since Apr 2007 • 1887 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to linger,

    perfect

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19683 posts Report Reply

  • andin, in reply to Ian Dalziel,

    Dunkin’ (Donut) Garner

    He is a total twat I think his undies are too tight!

    I don't link this Crusaders team to religious slaughters of the past.

    Well we know you dont dunderhead, but the crusader word came too mean something very different to members of the religion that was the target of those attacks. And still today stirs bad memories for many of them. Changing the name would show that the rugby club at least has some understanding of their history if not them.

    could cost the franchise $100 million.

    Could? just throw a figure out there would ya moron make it sound big so we're all shaking in our bank accounts. Fuck off Duncan.

    Does this mean the Chiefs name goes too, because bad stuff happened south of Taupiri? Do grass skirts go too?

    Hear of the term false equivalence dicksucker duncan, cause thats what you just did! Chiefs was a word unknown to Maori of the time its from Latin, I think and I doubt it would cause offence even now. And 'grass skits' really! Says a man who covers his cock with cloth.

    This terror attack is not about religion. Who cares about religion enough to go to war?

    You might want to rethink that. Racial supremacy identifies with religious intolerance.

    Don't let the gunman win.

    Its about empathy not a pissing contest cretin. Just stay on your radio wavelength so anyone with a brain can avoid you. Putting your piss poor pedantry to print is pathetic

    raglan • Since Mar 2007 • 1881 posts Report Reply

  • Alfie,

    At a time when our still-functioning democracy is providing a beacon of hope for the world, here's a reminder that the people behind Dirty Politics have not gone away. They've merely moved a little deeper into the shadows.

    The Guardian has an exposé on a series of dark-funded, psuedo-grassroot Facebook ads promoting a hard Brexit. While they appeared to come from a variety of independent groups, the Guardian has traced them back to the Tory and Nats' favourite Goebbelmeister, Lynton Crosby.

    But shining lights into dark places can have unexpected consequences and a couple of kiwis have been caught slithering in the periphery of this particular slime-show. Crosby has used Auckland-based Topham Guerin to run digital campaigns since 2016.

    They have previous. Apparently they were involved with National's digital campaign in the last election. I won't link to their website but it's generic enough to be the sort of free web template which pops up when you search for "bland". Domain registry details are masked; the site has zero contact details and no information on the two people behind it.

    Sean Topham is a former Young Nat President, while Ben Guerin was an adviser to Bill English. The latter's career high so far was being exposed as the lowlife behind National's How Kiwi Are You racist campaign which flopped badly back in 2015.

    The anachronism built into National's core policies -- expanded inequality, more oil drilling, more buggered waterways and never-ending tax cuts for those who already pay the least -- are becoming a much harder sell in a world that's burning up fast. And as Putin, Bannon et al have shown recently, Facebook manipulation pays dividends. Big time.

    In lieu of policy, spreading lies and micro-targeting misinformation generates fear. And that influences elections. You can guarantee these characters will emerge from their hole when Judith-the-Hun contests the next election for National.

    (And loses.)

    Dunedin • Since May 2014 • 1385 posts Report Reply

  • Alfie,

    Today Facebook and Instagram filed a lawsuit in US federal court against one company and three people based in New Zealand. The defendants operated a service that provided fake likes, views and followers to Instagram users. They'd been previously warned & suspended… but persisted.

    Wouldn't it be interesting if their names had cropped up previously?

    Dunedin • Since May 2014 • 1385 posts Report Reply

  • Alfie,

    Nah... it's three different guys who seem to be immersed in various social media enterprises, some of which are allegedly dodgy.

    Having Facebook decide to make an example of you is probably not an enviable position to find yourself in.

    Dunedin • Since May 2014 • 1385 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel,

    The thread that wouldn't die!
    Leak-hating Bridges now likes leaks, crows about them in fact.
    National Fan Girl Stacey Kirk - thinks this is great stuff - "impeccably timed" and "Class A oppositional work" - jeez, give me strength!
    This strikes to the heart of trust in Government, for an ex-lawyer and police prosecutor to be given legally embargoed Treasury information and not immediately advise Treasury and the Government of this undermines everything he claims to stand for. You know like doing the right thing!
    He would have gained far more political points that way rather than drip feeding the data through the day.
    Appalling behaviour and judgement by someone who says he wants a decent country, and doesn't like leaks!
    Compounded by his refusal to own his own words about 'the National Party culture review' he announced last October - he now says it wasn't that despite, video and newspaper evidence to the contrary - Totally Trumpian
    He definitely owes RNZ's Susie Ferguson an apology, but no he's doubling down on the denial - what a dis'honourable' dick.

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7887 posts Report Reply

  • Alfie, in reply to Ian Dalziel,

    The “more than 2000 unauthorised attempts” to access information from Treasury’s servers could easily refer to a single entry which attempted to access or download more than 2,000 documents. It’s sounding increasingly likely that access was via login, whether compromised or through someone on the inside.

    No matter – as long as the access was unauthorised, that’s a crime. A responsible party leader in receipt of stolen information might have reported the hack to either Police or the security services, ideally both. But Bridges didn’t.

    This morning he stated unequivocally that “there was no hack.” He knows this how?

    Bridges used the phrase “witch hunt” which has some unfortunate connotations in these times. A little nod to the loony right, perhaps?

    And he accused Grant Robertson of lying. Presuming Bridges’ standup this morning took place in the parliamentary lobby, does that count as “outside the house” in terms of privilege?

    You have to hand it to Simon Bridges. Ever since he took over as leader, he’s managed to turn every little Nat Party ballsup into a much, much bigger ballsup.

    Long may his doomed reign continue.

    Dunedin • Since May 2014 • 1385 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to Alfie,

    Attachment

    Simon Bridges. Ever since he took over as leader, he’s managed to turn every little Nat Party ballsup into a much, much bigger ballsup.
    Long may his doomed reign continue.

    Simoneus Bridges and his ragtag cohort cross the Rubicon - showing his affinity for wading in the shallow end of politics - Beware the Ides of June!

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7887 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Alfie,

    Lawyer Steven Price on Budget confidentiality.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19683 posts Report Reply

  • Alfie, in reply to Ian Dalziel,

    Then of course there's that other thing that happened recently, with NZ Customs intercepting the manuscript of the Boiled Whale book for no apparent legal reason.

    Motive? Who could possibly have had something to fear from any new revelations in the book? Not Slater... he has nothing of value any more and that includes his reputation. Which only leaves the original Dirty Politics brigade and the darker, even more evil side of the National Party.

    Nobody could deny that these people have connections, but you'd surely have to have some serious pull to convince customs officers to risk their careers performing an illegal search. Questions need to be asked.

    At least one thing is almost certain. When Simon Bridges comes out with an inevitable denial, he'll somehow manage to implicate himself and his party in this scandal too. He's clever like that.

    Dunedin • Since May 2014 • 1385 posts Report Reply

  • Alfie,

    And as an aside, our own mini-Crosby Textor outfit Topham Guerin -- mentioned above -- are being credited with helping the aussie right to win an “unwinnable” election.

    Manipulation trumps democracy too often these days.

    Dunedin • Since May 2014 • 1385 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel, in reply to Sacha,

    on Budget confidentiality.

    Steven Price makes good points.
    Mr Bridges claiming ‘moral authority’ (on air today) is a bit rich – he is part of Parliament and should therefore be part of the quality control chain – the onus was on him to tell Treasury that there was a flaw in the system – That was the right thing to do.
    If National had been in power this same system update glitch would most likely have occurred.
    It’s not like Grant Robertson updated the Treasury site of his own volition.

    Bridges just keeps reinforcing what a shallow thinker he is, a bear of little brain…

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 7887 posts Report Reply

  • simon g,

    It's just a shame (though inevitable) how many commentators did the headless chicken on the whole story. It's the ultimate insider game, and pronouncing who "Wins", without regard to the actual voters, can only reinforce the negative public perception of politics.

    To take just one example, I bet if you asked people on the street, they'd be far more interested in today's announcement on school donations, than in the Bridges/Treasury row. Something real and measurable, that makes a difference. But ... it will get 1% of the media coverage.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1321 posts Report Reply

  • Rob S, in reply to simon g,

    To me it just comes across as a stupid dick move.

    If that's the best he can do well...….why bother.

    Bad faith attacks on drug policy and crime rates seem to be his modus.

    Does he have a coherent political philosophy that doesn't boil down to tried and true lauranorder and taxes bad?

    Since Apr 2010 • 135 posts Report Reply

  • Neil,

    I think the emphasis the government has placed on mental health is significant and welcome.

    Not agreeing to a zero rate of suicide as a goal for suicide prevention does make sense. Those working in acute mental health will know only to well that there will always be a small number of people who will complete suicide despite concerted mental health involvement sometimes over many years. A zero goal would place health professionals under extreme pressure and lead to a number of unintended consequences.

    Including social housing funding along with mental health also makes sense. One of the major bottle necks in acute mental health is finding accomodation for inpatients once they have got well. But accomodation will have to come in various types including supervised settings and also some secure settings. It has to be a wrap around service.

    The new front line service proposed is more problematic and on the face of the scant information we have looks like it may fall into the trap of reinventing the wheel. There already is an extensive community mental health system designed to provide a range of services over the spectrum of mental health. Increased funding for that could easily extend the ability to provide increased services to the mild to moderate part of the spectrum. There’s no need to duplicate administrative structures.

    The biggest problem I have is that the inquiry and the budget proposals side step some of the most critical issues in mental health, issues that do not have easy solutions.

    Repealing and replacing the Mental Health Act sounds straight forward but there has been no broad community discussion about the consequences. There has been no specific evidence put forward to explain why the current act is problematic and no explanation of how a new act would be any improvement. This will be contentious to a degree as it revolves around such issues as risk, safety, coercion and responsibility.

    Health professionals I have spoken to believe that not having a compulsory treatment option will result in more mentally unwell winding up in prison.

    Since Nov 2016 • 351 posts Report Reply

  • Moz, in reply to Neil,

    Repealing and replacing the Mental Health Act sounds straight forward

    While I agree that the act isn't great, I am also concerned that we have a classic "something must be done, this is something" moment in the making. Hopefully this will be something that disappears into committee for a decent amount of consideration before reappearing more fully-fledged.

    Sydney, West Island • Since Nov 2006 • 1193 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford, in reply to Neil,

    Health professionals I have spoken to believe that not having a compulsory treatment option will result in more mentally unwell winding up in prison.

    One way around that is to change what prisons are.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4310 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Neil,

    There’s no need to duplicate administrative structures.

    Unless you want to avoid certain players.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19683 posts Report Reply

  • Neil, in reply to Sacha,

    Unless you want to avoid certain players.

    I haven’t heard that the govt has any issues with existing community mental health services. I’m not sure they know much about them. But if true it would be an extremely expensive remedy to duplicate an entire service and probably unfeasible given that lack of mental health professionals.

    Since Nov 2016 • 351 posts Report Reply

  • Neil, in reply to steven crawford,

    One way around that is to change what prisons are.

    I gather that the govt is looking at extending forensic mental health services in prisons.

    But at one extreme of a possible mental health act reform is the removal any form of compulsion. The argument being that no one should be detained on the grounds of mental illness.

    Under the current act if a young man with no previous mental health history assaults members of the public they can be detained by the Police if they believe the person may be mentally unwell – and not charged with an offence – and transported either to ED or the cells to be assessed by a psychiatrist.

    If that provision under the act were not there the only option for the police would be to charge the person for assault and they would then be dealt with in the justice system.

    Rumour has it that any review of the Act may focus on introducing capacity and treatability but none of it is straight forward.

    Prior to any reform the govt should lunch a major education campaign which could include dramatisations of actual complex scenarios that occur in acute mental health for the public to get a sense of the dilemmas and risks involved. Most people will have seen fly on the wall documentaries on Emergency Departments and other areas of health but there’s been no equivalent for acute mental health.

    Since Nov 2016 • 351 posts Report Reply

  • steven crawford, in reply to Neil,

    Under the current act if a young man with no previous mental health history assaults members of the public they can be detained by the Police if they believe the person may be mentally unwell – and not charged with an offence – and transported either to ED or the cells to be assessed by a psychiatrist.

    What you said is that the police can arrest someone who commits a crime. And they don’t have to follow thru with prosecuting them. That wouldn’t change under the proposals.

    Atlantis • Since Nov 2006 • 4310 posts Report Reply

  • Moz, in reply to steven crawford,

    police can arrest someone who commits a crime. And they don’t have to follow thru with prosecuting them

    But they have to let them go as soon as practicable, or charge them with something and then have the judge agree they should be remanded in custody. Giving up that set of rights in order to simplify the process of indefinitely imprisoning people who are mentally ill does not seem like a good idea. On several grounds.

    Sydney, West Island • Since Nov 2006 • 1193 posts Report Reply

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