Hard News by Russell Brown

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Hard News: Be careful what you wish for

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  • andin,

    two steps forward, one step back blip

    this dance step is getting awfully repetitive And really doesnt go anywhere, except round and round the dance floor. And if your the male leading, its that way. But for the other parties, its two steps backward

    I just had a look at Fox, boy are some of them crowing and preening. Not a sight I can take too much of, and long on the "we are going to make ourselves great again"??
    Its like they are chanting their affirmation out loud, it is mindbendingly inane.
    Looking at all of this I just think "your time is up" But we have to watch the death throes now OMFG

    raglan • Since Mar 2007 • 1890 posts Report Reply

  • Tony Meyer,

    Attachment

    Here's a longer term version of the popular vote for anyone interested. (Source archives.gov, other than 2016, and I had to copy over data, so it's possible I made transcription errors).

    Ahuroa • Since Jul 2012 • 11 posts Report Reply

  • Tony Meyer, in reply to Russell Brown,

    It makes what happened look much more like a return to the mean as Obama leaves the stage than a Trump surge.

    I’m not so sure of this. If you go back to 1972 as a starting point (somewhat arbitrary because it suits my narrative, sure), then you can see a pretty straight line up for the Dem’s – 1976 is abnormally high (post-Nixon), 1996 is a bit low (2nd Clinton), and Obama’s first election is abnormally high. But 2016 is quite low. Following those 44 years, you’d expect the “return to the mean” to be a lot closer to the 2012 number.

    (It doesn’t show a Trump surge, either. But it shows a Clinton slump, or voter suppression slump, etc).

    Ahuroa • Since Jul 2012 • 11 posts Report Reply

  • Tom Johnson,

    Being a bit of a fan boy of democracy its also a massive point that America is now being lead by the politics of the minority. The electoral college is fundamentally a system which fails basic democratic ideology and like a prerequisite in maths it fails as an instrument of majority role guaranteed.

    hamilton • Since Mar 2016 • 99 posts Report Reply

  • Amanda Wreckonwith, in reply to Hebe,

    Nothing to be done about it but garden: the fig tree is figging.

    Me too. Potting up māhoe and kānuka all morning followed by an afternoon tidying up the flower borders and earthing up the spuds. Just gotta tend that garden!

    What a sunny summer sky! What a day! What a day!
    For an Auto da Fé?

    Since Sep 2012 • 171 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    How Half of America Lost Its F**cking Mind

    By the executive editor of Cracked, who grew up in what is now Trump country.

    It paints a picture that dovetails perfectly with what the Gallup survey found – and earns my sympathy to a far greater degree than any of the sodding racist old-left bullshit I've been batting away on Facebook today. These people are actually suffering social problems and cultural anxiety, it's just a shame they went for Trump to fix it.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22848 posts Report Reply

  • Tom Johnson, in reply to Russell Brown,

    yep, anxiety is huge, and everywhere

    hamilton • Since Mar 2016 • 99 posts Report Reply

  • Tom Johnson,

    Anxious Syria. Trump policy is a Russian US squeeze, sheeeet.

    hamilton • Since Mar 2016 • 99 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    Implications in hard real words.

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 19740 posts Report Reply

  • Rich Lock, in reply to Russell Brown,

    By the executive editor of Cracked

    I read Cracked semi-regularly. As an aside, I find it really flipping bizarre that some of the best stories and analysis I've read in the last couple of years are coming from a self-proclaimed 'dick jokes' comedy website.

    back in the mother countr… • Since Feb 2007 • 2728 posts Report Reply

  • Rich Lock,

    Attachment

    Crude election turnout pie chart

    back in the mother countr… • Since Feb 2007 • 2728 posts Report Reply

  • Hilary Stace,

    Implications for disabled people, particularly the repeal of Obama Care.
    http://www.vox.com/first-person/2016/11/9/13576712/trump-disability-policy-affordable-care-act

    By the way, I have been puzzled about the enthusiasm of Trump supporters for repealing Obamacare, which is enabling millions more poorer Americans to access health care, as well as disability support. Today I learned why in an exchange with a Trump supporter. People are apparently being encouraged under Obamacare into third trimester abortions. So now you know.

    Wgtn • Since Jun 2008 • 3226 posts Report Reply

  • izogi, in reply to David Hood,

    (technically elections are optional, if it was state law that the state legislator appointed them, then that is what that state could do)

    Well that would be a fascinating adjustment to the election process.

    Wellington • Since Jan 2007 • 1141 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown, in reply to Rich Lock,

    I read Cracked semi-regularly. As an aside, I find it really flipping bizarre that some of the best stories and analysis I’ve read in the last couple of years are coming from a self-proclaimed ‘dick jokes’ comedy website.

    Indeed. This isn't the first time.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22848 posts Report Reply

  • Rich Lock,

    back in the mother countr… • Since Feb 2007 • 2728 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie, in reply to Hilary Stace,

    People are apparently being encouraged under Obamacare into third trimester abortions. So now you know.

    As we've long known, it was international PR firm Hill & Knowlton who concocted the Kuwaiti incubators story. As I'd been doing a little job for them re. the then upcoming Auckland Commonwealth Games when the story broke it kind of stuck in my mind.

    It's hardly the stuff of conspiracy theory to presume that those with deep pockets adversely affected by Obamacare would avail themselves of the services of similarly 'creative' talents on offer by the PR biz.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4593 posts Report Reply

  • Farmer Green,

    Lower North Island • Since Nov 2012 • 778 posts Report Reply

  • andin,

    These people are actually suffering social problems

    That has been obvious for at least 4 decades now, but politicians and social problems dont mix well. Funny that, when it should be them who put their hand up when its happening and try to do something.
    The same goes for most of what is euphemistically called the developed world.

    There's an old saying money makes a good servant but a bad master. Or something like that.
    And these gutless shits(pollies) have been hiding behind the mighty dollar for too long.

    raglan • Since Mar 2007 • 1890 posts Report Reply

  • Farmer Green, in reply to ,

    I wouldn’t recommend reading too far into that.

    Don't pull your punches.
    "A country designed to resist tyranny has now embraced it. A constitution designed to prevent democracy taking over everything has now succumbed to it. A country once defined by self-government has openly, clearly, enthusiastically delivered its fate into the hands of one man to do as he sees fit. "

    It looks like pure horseshit to me.

    Lower North Island • Since Nov 2012 • 778 posts Report Reply

  • Alan Perrott, in reply to Russell Brown,

    that Cracked piece was quite the wake up - in a same but different line, there's also Jonathan Pie...

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 438 posts Report Reply

  • nzlemming,

    Trump just announced he won't repeal Obamacare, but will only amend it. There goes Senate Republican support...

    Waikanae • Since Nov 2006 • 2935 posts Report Reply

  • David Hood, in reply to nzlemming,

    Trump just announced he won’t repeal Obamacare, but will only amend it.

    It is a bit more complicated than that- at the moment Trump doesn't have a plan, and what plan happens is done by congress with Presidential signify.
    http://www.politico.com/story/2016/11/gop-obamacare-rift-231272

    Dunedin • Since May 2007 • 1445 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown, in reply to David Hood,

    It is a bit more complicated than that- at the moment Trump doesn’t have a plan, and what plan happens is done by congress with Presidential signify.

    To be fair, he did promise to immediately repeal it. Which would be bizarrely stupid, but there you go.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 22848 posts Report Reply

  • simon g,

    I can think we can safely assume that Republicans in Congress always knew he was bullshitting about many of his promises: there won't be a wall or a special prosecutor for Hillary. The swing voters have been pocketed, the win delivered, and he won't be running in 2020, so it doesn't matter.

    The Republicans' goal now has little to do with Trojan Trump: it's as many gains as possible for Pence and the general conservative agenda. Ideally for them, they would lock in the changes (e.g Supreme Court) and then when popular anger is directed at Trump, get Pence or other smoother candidate for next time.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1330 posts Report Reply

  • David Hood,

    I could, in theory, see Trump picking a fight with Congress, claiming that the Washington Elite are stopping him from implementing his awesome plans. Because his time is Republicans (if somewhat fringe) I don't know if that will actually happen.

    But, tactically, it would give Trump someone to blame for things not being awesome, and we know some of the congressional Republicans are already on his enemies list.

    Dunedin • Since May 2007 • 1445 posts Report Reply

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