Hard News by Russell Brown

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Hard News: Bourdain

20 Responses

  • Grant McDougall,

    A very good tribute, Russell.

    One of the best stories I've heard about him was that when he was just starting his career in NYC in the late '70s he'd often go to CBGBs after work, which at that point in time would've been mind-blowing just about every evening.

    He also ended up good mates with Iggy Pop, they're cut from the same cloth, so no surprise they hit it off.

    Dunedin • Since Dec 2006 • 753 posts Report Reply

  • simon g,

    Thanks for that, Russell.

    I’ve always loved the respect he showed to the people he met on his travels

    This, very much. Not "me, me", but "them, them". Many people on television today could learn from him.

    Desperately sad news this morning.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1239 posts Report Reply

  • Francisco Blaha,

    >They come from a culture where they’re predisposed to enjoy food, where food is an intimate and important event. They have good character and a sense of humour and a good work ethic. I think that’s really all that’s required.
    >You talk a lot about Mexicans in the first two books …
    >God’s people.

    That is a very nice thing to say... wish more of its fellow citizens think the same.

    Since Dec 2006 • 15 posts Report Reply

  • Soon Lee,

    Thank you Russell.

    Auckland • Since Apr 2013 • 139 posts Report Reply

  • Carol Stewart,

    What a great interview.
    And how very sad.

    Wellington • Since Jul 2008 • 816 posts Report Reply

  • SHG,

    nice. cheers.

    nup • Since Oct 2010 • 70 posts Report Reply

  • Jim Cathcart,

    Drank with Bourdain in the stand-up bar, working-class district of Nishinari, Osaka where various animal parts and offal are grilled and served on the streets. He mentioned about the authenticity of culture is always found in these places, despite the bemusement of his local Japanese support team about wanting to go there instead of a rigid kaiseki establishment. Remarkable man.

    Since Nov 2006 • 228 posts Report Reply

  • Miche Campbell,

    His death has hit me hard, like David Bowie's and Joe Strummer's did.

    Thank you for this.

    Dunedin • Since Feb 2011 • 79 posts Report Reply

  • Che Tibby,

    Same. I read kitchen confidential when I was working two jobs, one being dish pig. It validated what I was doing and resonated incredibly loudly off the lunatics I was working with.

    the back of an envelope • Since Nov 2006 • 2042 posts Report Reply

  • Zach Bagnall,

    CNN is doing a long live show remembering Bourdain at the moment. Bill Buford was just on, speaking candidly. It's rather sweet.

    Colorado • Since Nov 2006 • 118 posts Report Reply

  • EliotBlennerhassett,

    I have very vivid memories of driving towards Blenheim with A Cooks Tour audiobook read by Bourdain playing. On reaching the part about killing the pig I had to pull over because my blood pressure dropped so much I was in danger of blacking out. Talk about evocative writing!

    Christhcurch • Since Jan 2010 • 14 posts Report Reply

  • nzlemming,

    The world is just a little bit darker today.

    Waikanae • Since Nov 2006 • 2891 posts Report Reply

  • nzlemming,

    Waikanae • Since Nov 2006 • 2891 posts Report Reply

  • Tim Michie,

    Auckward • Since Nov 2006 • 614 posts Report Reply

  • Roger M,

    Thank you Russell, I too was shocked when I woke up and read that. I was also shocked to read some of the nastiness and vindictiveness in some of the on-line commentary.

    Hamilton • Since Jun 2018 • 2 posts Report Reply

  • Jason Kemp,

    A great interview Russell. Thanks for that. It is clear that Bourdain had great lodes of shared experience and empathy with many of the people and situations he wrote about. From what I've seen he captured the wider context in a way that illuminated and respected all of the players.

    I have been watching the "parts Unknown" series and the same empathy and connection is very clear through out.

    Sad he is gone but we can still read / watch much of his work and appreciate him and our fellow travellers just a little bit more.

    I found this New Yorker Preventable Tragedies over the weekend.

    "There is another factor that should not be underestimated. On a national stage, we’ve seen an embrace of prejudice and intolerance, and that affects the mood of all citizens. My psychoanalyst said that he had never before had every one of his patients discuss national politics repeatedly, in session after session. Now there is a continuous strain of anxiety and fear from one side, and brutality from the other. "....
    ...
    "At the moment, many people’s vulnerability is exacerbated by the unkindness manifest in each day’s headlines. We feel both our own anguish and the world’s. There is a dearth of empathy, even of kindness, in the national conversation, and those deficits turn ordinary neurosis into actionable despair."

    Thanks again for the interview and thanks AB for the many shared experiences and the insights.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 355 posts Report Reply

  • Roger M,

    "At the moment, many people’s vulnerability is exacerbated by the unkindness manifest in each day’s headlines. We feel both our own anguish and the world’s. There is a dearth of empathy, even of kindness, in the national conversation, and those deficits turn ordinary neurosis into actionable despair."

    Exactly!

    Hamilton • Since Jun 2018 • 2 posts Report Reply

  • Rob Stowell,

    Great interview, Russell. Thanks!
    Does anyone else get a sense there's something about western culture in this 21st century world that's seriously askew? Courtesy of the youngers,listening to a fair bit of contemporary music - from pop to anti-folk. There seems to be a deep vein of sadness, wistfulness, and irony gentle or savage, running through most of it. Feels in striking contrast to the optimism (and anger) of 60s music, for example.

    Whakaraupo • Since Nov 2006 • 2071 posts Report Reply

  • Joe Wylie, in reply to Rob Stowell,

    Courtesy of the youngers,listening to a fair bit of contemporary music - from pop to anti-folk. There seems to be a deep vein of sadness, wistfulness, and irony gentle or savage, running through most of it. Feels in striking contrast to the optimism (and anger) of 60s music, for example.

    How about some feel-good Javanese metal? Several decades of imbibing Smoke on the Water with their mothers' milk doesn't seem to have done these kids any harm.

    flat earth • Since Jan 2007 • 4566 posts Report Reply

  • Rob Stowell,

    Thanks Joe. That did me good - I think!

    Whakaraupo • Since Nov 2006 • 2071 posts Report Reply

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