Up Front by Emma Hart

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Up Front: What's the Big Idea?

109 Responses

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  • DeepRed, in reply to Bart Janssen,

    Same problem with Labour, the list position favours the "experienced MPs" aka old ones.

    In fairness, most of the Clark-era caucus has stepped down from Parliament. Still, there should be a balance between fresh talent and long experience in any case.

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5239 posts Report Reply

  • Rob Stowell,

    big ideas continuing to gain traction despite an almost universally hostile press.
    It's not the moment for careful triangulation. Voters want - need - a clear alternative.

    Whakaraupo • Since Nov 2006 • 1984 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Rob Stowell,

    Well, Labour's vote is growing anyway. That article is more about the Tories basically pissing away some votes, by alienating the elderly. The big surprise in the article was that the average house price in the UK is only $215,000 pounds. Way more affordable than NZ.

    It’s not the moment for careful triangulation.

    Can I ask a silly question? What does "triangulation" mean in the context of politics? I understand it to be usually used to find things, like heights or transmitter locations.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10359 posts Report Reply

  • Carol Stewart, in reply to BenWilson,

    In social science, it simply means 'using multiple data sources or methods'. Here's a nice discussion.

    Wellington • Since Jul 2008 • 784 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Carol Stewart,

    OK, it doesn't really sound like something you'd dispense with. At the very least you could use it to gain more confidence that your big idea was really gaining traction. Or it could work the other way, showing that it actually is not. Either way, it's making a picture based on information about what we observe, rather than what we want to observe.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10359 posts Report Reply

  • Rob Stowell, in reply to BenWilson,

    Can I ask a silly question? What does “triangulation” mean in the context of politics?

    I'm probably mis-using the term. But this is kind've what I meant https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangulation_(politics)

    Whakaraupo • Since Nov 2006 • 1984 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Rob Stowell,

    OK, I thought so. I don't think you're misusing it, it's just a confusing term when used this way, which is hardly surprising considering that it was coined by a spin doctor. Essentially you're using it to mean "moving to the middle"? AKA Centrism, and maybe Third Wayism?

    So many different ways to reinvent the two dimensional analysis that has dominated Anglo political discourse since always. TBH, I don't think either agreeing with or opposing this strategy makes that much sense. Neither is a big idea. They're old ideas, and the frame the entire discourse as taking place along the single dimension between the two main parties.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 10359 posts Report Reply

  • Rich Lock, in reply to BenWilson,

    the average house price in the UK is only £215,000 pounds. Way more affordable than NZ.

    Not really. The UK's median wage is around £27,000, give or take. The typical upper range of what a mortgage lender will provide, for a couple, both of whom are earning the median wage, is between £135K and £189K, which still means a hefty deposit (probably from the bank of mum and dad).

    And the usual caveats apply. The average house price in London is between £500K (1-2 bed flat), and £630K (terraced house). In Brighton, it's £390K; in Cambridge, it's £500K; in Milton Keynes, it's £273K; in Bristol, it's £287K (with the exception of Bristol, these are all cities generally in the SE of England). If you go somewhere like Hull (north), then sure, it's £119K. But there's a reason for that (no-one wants to live there, and the median wage is considerably lower than the overall UK median wage, at 19.5K).

    back in the mother countr… • Since Feb 2007 • 2659 posts Report Reply

  • DeepRed, in reply to Rich Lock,

    If you go somewhere like Hull (north), then sure, it's £119K. But there's a reason for that (no-one wants to live there, and the median wage is considerably lower than the overall UK median wage, at 19.5K).

    For the same reasons Detroit and St Louis are affordable: industry has left town and the unemployment & crime rates are high.

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 5239 posts Report Reply

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