Southerly by David Haywood

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Southerly: Refugee Status

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  • Sofie Bribiesca,

    I should've mentioned: all profits donated to a great cause (rebuilding an earthquake damaged house in Avonside, and earthquake-proofing Peter Adamson's house in Wellington).

    David I have to link my favourite cartoon character to attempt a moment of light hearted relief for you and possibly an idea to raise more funds?

    here and there. • Since Nov 2007 • 6281 posts Report Reply

  • David Haywood,

    giovanni tiso wrote:

    Where have I heard this name before, David?

    Yes, I now feel very guilty for all the jokes I've made about Darfield, and now admit that it is a beautiful place -- almost a Venice of the Southern Hemisphere (there is a certain similarity in the smell; and one can easily imagine the Darfield water-race as a network of picturesque canals).

    Deborah wrote:

    I want that book too. Also the piano in the illustration. You'll let us know when we can order it?

    Will do. And, yes, it is a very fine piano. I think I'll ask Peter to knock me up one as well...

    Feel rather cheery this morning -- just off to chainsaw down a tree that's fallen against our garage. It's hard to feel sad when you're wielding a chainsaw, I've always found.

    Dunsandel • Since Nov 2006 • 992 posts Report Reply

  • Rob Hosking,

    It's hard to feel sad when you're wielding a chainsaw, I've always found,

    This is a Great Insight. You've got the start to a Self Help book, right there.

    Finally spoke to friends of mine in Lyttleton last night. They've calculated they can sleep through aftershocks up to around 4.5, 4.6. Anything more and they're up with their nerves going Clang.

    South Roseneath • Since Nov 2006 • 805 posts Report Reply

  • Isabel Hitchings,

    So glad to hear you sounding undaunted. Enjoy that chainsaw (in sensible moderation of course).

    Christchurch • Since Jul 2007 • 706 posts Report Reply

  • Ian MacKay,

    Pleased to hear that Bob is undaunted. The leadership from his parents must be effective.

    One of the famous Christchurch architects. (Sir Miles Warren?) was just saying on Nine to Noon that many of those older pre -World War I buildings should have been removed years ago, as they were just cheap basic units built on unsound foundations. He did say that it was a pity that they had to fall in such a fashion. What to replace them with?

    Bleheim • Since Nov 2006 • 498 posts Report Reply

  • Lilith __,

    It's hard to feel sad when you're wielding a chainsaw, I've always found.

    Chainsaws are also very effective against zombies. Keep yours to hand.

    They've calculated they can sleep through aftershocks up to around 4.5, 4.6.

    What seismic connoisseurs we are becoming, here in Chch!

    Dunedin • Since Jul 2010 • 3470 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel,

    The advice we've always been given to stand in a doorway or take cover under a table is still the best.

    there is conflicting advice all over - I heard an expert on Radio yesterday saying the doorway was the best place to be, and then on TV another expert saying it was a bad place as you can be thrown about and hit...

    ...what to do?

    I find the worst damage from freely dislodged masonry
    is the apron slapping and regalia scratching...

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 5070 posts Report Reply

  • Lucy Stewart,

    there is conflicting advice all over - I heard an expert on Radio yesterday saying the doorway was the best place to be, and then on TV another expert saying it was a bad place as you can be thrown about and hit...

    ...what to do?

    I expect it depends largely on circumstances. For instance, if your toom features a big sturdy solid wood table, I'd be getting under that, but if it's some cheap kitset Warewhare job, or no table at all? Under the doorway right quick.

    The key things are basically a) have something to protect you from the ceiling falling in and b)get low down to avoid flying objects and glass. How you minimise those risks is largely up to luck and the furnishing choices of whoever designed the room you're in. I imagine a swinging door could give you a good smack, as this article says, but that might be the least of your worries in some buildings.

    Amherst, MA • Since Nov 2006 • 2093 posts Report Reply

  • Lilith __,

    I heard an expert on Radio yesterday saying the doorway was the best place to be, and then on TV another expert saying it was a bad place as you can be thrown about and hit...

    During Saturday's quake I was gripping my doorframe with both hands. Everything moves at such a time, so you can see why holding on to the firmest (and least likey to topple) thing is a good idea.

    I read here that near the epicentre on Saturday morning the force of the earthquake was 1.25 times the force of gravity.

    Dunedin • Since Jul 2010 • 3470 posts Report Reply

  • Ben Austin,

    Well, the story of Albert the Otter was quite heart warming but my naive mind did not detect the promised erotica.

    This Is No Bad Thing

    London • Since Nov 2006 • 896 posts Report Reply

  • Kyle Matthews,

    there is conflicting advice all over - I heard an expert on Radio yesterday saying the doorway was the best place to be, and then on TV another expert saying it was a bad place as you can be thrown about and hit...

    You could be, but the doorway is to protect you when your house collapsing around you. The least likely thing to stay collapse is the supporting wall that your doorway sits in.

    If your house collapses and the worst that comes out of it is that you're alive in there but thrown around and bashed up, you've done bloody well. It's a worst case scenario response.

    In a lesser earthquake you'd be fine standing in the middle of the room enjoying the ride, as long as there is no chandalier overhead.

    Since Nov 2006 • 6207 posts Report Reply

  • Ian Dalziel,

    Well, the story of Albert the Otter was quite heart warming but my naive mind did not detect the promised erotica.

    ...stay tuned for the eagerly awaited sequel:
    Victoria the Beaver - The Regina Mono-logs

    Christchurch • Since Dec 2006 • 5070 posts Report Reply

  • Gareth,

    This all sounds like an argument for reinforced four poster beds. Opportunity there for someone, perhaps?

    Bucolic in the backblocks… • Since Jan 2008 • 202 posts Report Reply

  • George Darroch,

    I expect it depends largely on circumstances. For instance, if your toom features a big sturdy solid wood table, I'd be getting under that, but if it's some cheap kitset Warewhare job, or no table at all?

    I have a glass table. Should I shelter under that?

    Jokes aside, I'm glad that Christchurch features precious little of those glass panes in the roof that seem to have become common recently. They may be good for lighting, but I'd hate to have a bed anywhere near one.

    The People's Republic of … • Since Nov 2006 • 2136 posts Report Reply

  • paulalambert,

    A civil defence person on tv last night explained about sheltering in doorframes. He said something like ... in modern homes the doorframe is far less likely to be in a load-bearing wall and therefore less safe to shelter in, and that it would just come down with the ceiling. The other danger if you were standing in doorway was the obvious get 'thrown to the floor'.

    Yesterday I asked one of the firemen who came around to sort out my chimney about the triangle thing. He said even dropping out of bed onto the floor beside it would be enough to save you from falling beams, ceilings. But if you were upstairs in an old multi-storey building you should probably kiss your a*** goodbye! lol

    Gotta keep a sense of humour... gotta keep a sense of humour....

    chch • Since Dec 2006 • 107 posts Report Reply

  • Matthew Reid,

    Sorry to hear about the level of destruction/disruption to your house. Over in the south of Chch we're feeling fortunate that we only had the chimney land on the roof, brief loss of power, phone and interent and no problems with running water and sewerage.

    My first thought, curiously, was to hope that we were near the epicentre of the earthquake. If it had been centred any distance away -- Wellington sprang to mind, of course -- then I knew that anything at the epicentre must have been utterly destroyed.

    This was also my second or third thought while the quake was still rolling on Saturday, after "Right, we've got the kids and they're okay" and "I should've put some shoes on in case of broken galss". I was actually happy to hear that Canterbury was affected, that Wellington was not flattened and we weren't getting the relatively minor rumblings of an enormous quake elsewhere.

    In the aftermath I have been very grateful that, relatively speaking, things have not been disastrous in Chch. Of course, I feel for poeple who have lost their homes or their work.

    Personally speaking I'm still disturbed by the aftershocks, but I'm glad that a few broken glasses, a dent in the roof and half a day without power have been the worst of our problems. That this isn't Santiago, Port-au-Prince, Kashmir, Shichuan, Sumatra, or Bam, or some other place were people are cast out of their homes and normal lives by natual or human made disasters. Having met some of those unfortunate people, I have a renewed sympathy for them.

    South Africa • Since Nov 2006 • 79 posts Report Reply

  • Emma Hart,

    The other danger if you were standing in doorway was the obvious get 'thrown to the floor'.

    So, surely, sit in the doorway?

    Christchurch • Since Nov 2006 • 4369 posts Report Reply

  • Kyle Matthews,

    I think the actual instructions are brace yourself in the doorway. Sitting would be good. I think a lot of people might be holding onto someone else (partner, kids), so back to one side of the door and feet pushing against the other side would be smart.

    Since Nov 2006 • 6207 posts Report Reply

  • Carol Stewart,

    The other danger if you were standing in doorway was the obvious get 'thrown to the floor'.

    I'm also curious about whether you would get clobbered by the door swinging wildly around - was this a problem for anyone?

    Christchurch • Since Jul 2008 • 662 posts Report Reply

  • George Darroch,

    In 4 years living in Wellington, I always thought of earthquakes as entertainment. The house shaking, the low noise. A low risk novelty, like high winds or excessive rain.

    I've yet to have them turn into an object of fear, but I'm beginning to suspect that transformation is approaching.

    The People's Republic of … • Since Nov 2006 • 2136 posts Report Reply

  • paulalambert,

    The only things swinging around in this 90 yr old wooden house were the lighting and the chimes. The cupboard doors just rattled. And the chimes haven't sounded in any but the biggest of the aftershocks since.

    chch • Since Dec 2006 • 107 posts Report Reply

  • Tom Semmens,

    We huddled in the doorway in total darkness as pictures fell from our walls and crockery smashed in the kitchen.

    The zero deaths were not just a result of fortuitous timing. All those drills at school from an early age, all that earthquake education - it meant in an emergency people knew what to do.

    I've read of a couple of people who saved their own lives by leaping from their beds and heading to doorways moments before masonry walls collapsed onto their beds.

    No deaths may be lucky, but we've also made our own luck.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 1811 posts Report Reply

  • Lucy Telfar Barnard,

    in modern homes the doorframe is far less likely to be in a load-bearing wall [emphasis mine]

    Hmmm. What does the advice giver mean by "modern"? If he means post-1980, that's not a particularly large segment of the housing stock. But thanks for that extra detail on why they were advising against doorways. Our house is 1905, and all our doorways are in load-bearing walls, so I think I'll stick with the doorway if I'm at home.

    Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 375 posts Report Reply

  • Lilith __,

    I think the actual instructions are brace yourself in the doorway. Sitting would be good. I think a lot of people might be holding onto someone else (partner, kids), so back to one side of the door and feet pushing against the other side would be smart.

    Yeah - on Saturday morning I don't know that bracing in a doorway was really an option. The ground was rippling and I could feel different bits of the house swaying and jerking in different directions simultaneously. The reason you sit, crouch, or hang on, is that balancing isn't an option anymore.

    He said even dropping out of bed onto the floor beside it would be enough to save you from falling beams, ceilings.

    If I'd dropped out of bed one way I would have got hit by a heavy mirror, and the other way I would have got hit by a falling bookcase. The great thing about doorways is that they are away from falling objects as well as windows.

    Dunedin • Since Jul 2010 • 3470 posts Report Reply

  • Russell Brown,

    News breaking via Twitter that David and Jen have just received the coveted green sticker for their house. Excellent news.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 18991 posts Report Reply

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