Hard News by Russell Brown

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Hard News: It's In the Kete!

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  • Hebe, in reply to bob daktari,

    I liked the Aunties (Ask An Auntie? or something) until the aunties started to be younger than me.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2601 posts Report Reply

  • Islander, in reply to Hebe,

    Respect the aunties a generation older than yourself and, always, know you know better than them - :)

    Big O, Mahitahi, Te Wahi … • Since Feb 2007 • 5643 posts Report Reply

  • Craig Ranapia, in reply to Islander,

    And yes, there is an argument to be made that some culturally esteemed foods were originally for the poverty-stricken.

    In a lot of cases, it's not even really a matter for argument as just knowing your cultural/culinary history. Haggis might sound fucking revolting, but if you had to raise (or as likely track down and kill) every gram of protein you ate why the hell wouldn't it be simple prudence to figure out a way to preserve, eat or otherwise use everything. Even the "nasty bits". Being one bad season away from starvation is a wonderful spur to creativity.

    North Shore, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 11902 posts Report Reply

  • Jackie Clark, in reply to Hebe,

    I loved that programme. And I can honestly say it was one of the big thrills of my life to hear Ella Henry speak about her life at the Late at the Museum panel last year. Absolute joy. I have huge admiration, and love, for her zest for life, and humour.

    Mt Eden, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3123 posts Report Reply

  • DeepRed, in reply to Craig Ranapia,

    Being one bad season away from starvation is a wonderful spur to creativity.

    I am reminded of a (maybe Northern) Chinese quote that says the Cantonese eat anything on four legs that isn't a table, and anything that flies that isn't an airplane. And apparently it actually predates Prince Philip's feet-in-mouth.

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 4228 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to Islander,

    Respect the aunties a generation older than yourself and, always, know you know better than them - :)

    Heh. On a good day I listen. On a bad day, I run. Hope all is good for you Islander.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2601 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Hebe,

    On a good day I listen. On a bad day, I run

    great proverb

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16605 posts Report Reply

  • Danielle, in reply to Craig Ranapia,

    Haggis might sound fucking revolting

    I tasted it once and thought it was awesome. Offal FTW!

    Charo World. Cuchi-cuchi!… • Since Nov 2006 • 3652 posts Report Reply

  • BenWilson, in reply to Steve Barnes,

    Yuk. You love the strangest things Islander.

    She's our very own Bear Grylls. Except she doesn't sleep in hotels between shows.

    Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 8441 posts Report Reply

  • merc, in reply to BenWilson,

    ...and I bet Islander knows where Argentina is, unlike Bear.

    Since Dec 2006 • 2471 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Danielle,

    what does offal even taste like?

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16605 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to Sacha,

    In our family we watch for the deep sigh, the slap of both hands on the thighs and the intake of breath... then it's time to find an urgent cup of tea to make or else hours and hours are gone until another breath is drawn. If you have the garrulous, ancient and dotty near you, you will know what I mean.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2601 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe, in reply to BenWilson,

    She's our very own Bear Grylls. Except she doesn't sleep in hotels between shows.

    :-))

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2601 posts Report Reply

  • Craig Ranapia, in reply to DeepRed,

    I am reminded of a (maybe Northern) Chinese quote that says the Cantonese eat anything on four legs that isn’t a table, and anything that flies that isn’t an airplane.

    My culinary m.o during our three days in Hong Kong next month will be "If it looks appetizing go for it, and what you don't know will neither kill you nor make you look like an obnoxious gwailo tourist". (Which I am, truth be told - but there's no need to put out on the first date.) :)

    North Shore, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 11902 posts Report Reply

  • nzlemming, in reply to Sacha,

    what does offal even taste like?

    It might taste like liver (nummy, fried with onions and gravy) or kidneys (also nummy. especially with bacon) or tripe (bloody awful - I don't care what anyone says), or any number of internal organs and bits that don't qualify as "cuts of meat"(tm)

    Offal /ˈɒfəl/,[1] also called, especially in the United States, variety meats or organ meats, refers to the internal organs and entrails of a butchered animal. The word does not refer to a particular list of edible organs, which varies by culture and region, but includes most internal organs other than muscle and bone. As an English mass noun, the term "offal" has no plural form. Some cultures shy away from offal as food, while others use it as everyday food, or in delicacies.

    Wikipedia is your friend

    Waikanae • Since Nov 2006 • 2070 posts Report Reply

  • Jackie Clark, in reply to nzlemming,

    I LOVE offal. And I'm very fond of haggis. Rotten corn, not so much.

    Mt Eden, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3123 posts Report Reply

  • Rich of Observationz, in reply to Jackie Clark,

    Brains. The Larder in Miramar does excellent brains, and it's kinda appropriate.

    Back in Wellington • Since Nov 2006 • 4442 posts Report Reply

  • Chris Waugh, in reply to DeepRed,

    I am reminded of a (maybe Northern) Chinese quote that says the Cantonese eat anything on four legs that isn’t a table, and anything that flies that isn’t an airplane.

    Very apocryphal, and there are several variations, but I've tried it on my students, and even those from Guangdong agree. One from Guangdong recently even took it a few steps beyond my comfort zone, and I 'grew up' in Changsha, where there's a similarly broad range of 'edible' and I saw many a critter whose species I could not recognise sitting in a cage outside a restaurant or in a butchery market waiting to be eaten.

    Beijing • Since Jan 2007 • 2052 posts Report Reply

  • Jackie Clark, in reply to Rich of Observationz,

    I have a wonderful story about brains, funnily enough. My mother cooked them for us as children, maybe twice. I think I was about 11, and we went on a school trip to the Health Fair at the Auckland Showgrounds. That day, my lunch happened to be brain sandwiches (I don’t know why I had sandwiches, I only like them made fresh, but I digress…..). One of the things we saw, and it’s the only thing I remember about the day, is a film about hydatids. It was pretty gross. For possibly the first time in my life, my appetite deserted me. That brain sandwich went straight in the bin.

    Mt Eden, Auckland • Since Nov 2006 • 3123 posts Report Reply

  • Danielle,

    Mexican Specialities in Ellerslie is currently doing a grasshopper taco. For someone who has sucked the brains out of a thousand boiled crawfish, I am surprisingly squeamish about it. It's all what you're used to I suppose.

    Charo World. Cuchi-cuchi!… • Since Nov 2006 • 3652 posts Report Reply

  • Stewart,

    Is this thread-jack into food topics a sign that we have waited long enough for the official Food Blog?

    (I'm a big haggis fan & enjoy liver & kidneys but not keen on brains or tripe. Last time I tried tripe I chewed it for a while, swallowed it and a moment later it just popped back into my mouth! I figured my body was trying to tell me something so have given tripe the big swerve ever since.)

    Te Ika A Maui - Waitakere… • Since Oct 2008 • 572 posts Report Reply

  • DeepRed,

    Has anyone here visited the Hokitika Wild Foods Fest? Does it live up to its name?

    The southernmost capital … • Since Nov 2006 • 4228 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha, in reply to Danielle,

    For someone who has sucked the brains out of a thousand boiled crawfish

    Braaaains

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16605 posts Report Reply

  • Sacha,

    Feel free to threadjack onto movies :)

    Ak • Since May 2008 • 16605 posts Report Reply

  • Hebe,

    Offal in the kete; yuk. Fergus Henderson's Nose To Tail Eating is the modern bible on food like that. A stomach-turning read, but interesting, for those of us who cannot forget mad cow disease.

    Christchurch • Since May 2011 • 2601 posts Report Reply

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